Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 535542
Title Control of Lyme borreliosis and other Ixodes ricinus-borne diseases
Author(s) Sprong, Hein; Azagi, Tal; Hoornstra, Dieuwertje; Nijhof, Ard M.; Knorr, Sarah; Baarsma, M.E.; Hovius, Joppe W.
Source Parasites & Vectors 11 (2018)1. - ISSN 1756-3305
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13071-018-2744-5
Department(s) Laboratory of Entomology
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Keyword(s) Anaplasmosis - Ixodes ricinus - Lyme borreliosis - Prevention - Tick-borne encephalitis - Transmission cycles - Vaccines
Abstract Lyme borreliosis (LB) and other Ixodes ricinus-borne diseases (TBDs) are diseases that emerge from interactions of humans and domestic animals with infected ticks in nature. Nature, environmental and health policies at (inter)national and local levels affect the risk, disease burden and costs of TBDs. Knowledge on ticks, their pathogens and the diseases they cause have been increasing, and resulted in the discovery of a diversity of control options, which often are not highly effective on their own. Control strategies involving concerted actions from human and animal health sectors as well as from nature managers have not been formulated, let alone implemented. Control of TBDs asks for a "health in all policies" approach, both at the (inter)national level, but also at local levels. For example, wildlife protection and creating urban green spaces are important for animal and human well-being, but may increase the risk of TBDs. In contrast, culling or fencing out deer decreases the risk for TBDs under specific conditions, but may have adverse effects on biodiversity or may be societally unacceptable. Therefore, in the end, nature and health workers together must carry out tailor-made control options for the control of TBDs for humans and animals, with minimal effects on the environment. In that regard, multidisciplinary approaches in environmental, but also medical settings are needed. To facilitate this, communication and collaboration between experts from different fields, which may include patient representatives, should be promoted.
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