Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 536137
Title Vegetables and social relations in Norway and the Netherlands : A comparative analysis of Urban allotment gardeners
Author(s) Veen, Esther J.; Eiter, Sebastian
Source Nature and Culture 13 (2018)1. - ISSN 1558-6073 - p. 135 - 160.
DOI https://doi.org/10.3167/nc.2018.130107
Department(s) Rural Sociology
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Keyword(s) Almere - Diets - Inclusiveness - Interest-based gardens - Motivations - Oslo
Abstract This article aims to explore differences in motivation for and actual use of allotment gardens. Results from questionnaire surveys and semistructured interviews in two Norwegian and one Dutch garden show that growing vegetables and consuming the harvest is a fundamental part of gardening. The same is true for the social element-meeting and talking to other gardeners, and feeling as part of a community. Although gardeners with different socioeconomic backgrounds experience gardening to some extent similarly, access to an allotment seems more important for gardeners with disadvantaged personal backgrounds: both their diets and their social networks rely more on, and benefit more from, their allotments. This underlines the importance of providing easy access to gardening opportunities for all urban residents, and disadvantaged groups in particular. Public officers and policy makers should consider this when deciding upon new gardening sites or public investments in urban food gardens.
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