Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 536617
Title Weather correlates of Campylobacter prevalence in broilers at slaughter under tropical conditions in Sri Lanka
Author(s) Kalupahana, R.S.; Mughini-Gras, L.; Kottawatta, S.A.; Somarathne, S.; Gamage, C.; Wagenaar, J.A.
Source Epidemiology and Infection 146 (2018)8. - ISSN 0950-2688 - p. 972 - 979.
DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0950268818000894
Department(s) CVI Bacteriology and Epidemiology
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Keyword(s) Campylobacter - poultry - seasonality - tropical weather
Abstract Campylobacter is the primary agent of human bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. In contrast to temperate zones, weather effects on Campylobacter prevalence in broilers under tropical conditions are under-researched. We examined the association between weather and Campylobacter prevalence in slaughtered broilers in Sri Lanka, a tropical country with weather variations led by monsoons. Each month (October 2009–July 2011), 20–30 broiler batches referring to two semi-automated slaughterhouses from five Sri Lankan provinces were tested for Campylobacter contamination and analysed in relation to temperature, humidity and rainfall. Overall prevalence was 63.8% (95% CI 59.6–67.9%, n = 542), peaking in September–November. Each 1 °C increase in monthly mean temperature up to 26 °C increased Campylobacter-positive batches by 16.4% (95% CI 0.4–35.1%). For each 10 mm increase in monthly total rainfall up to 300 mm, Campylobacter-positive batches increased significantly by 0.8% (0.1–1.5%) at 1-month lag. For each 1% increase in relative humidity up to 80% at 1- and 2-month lags, Campylobacter-positive batches increased of respectively 4.2% (1.9–6.7%) and 4.0% (1.5–6.5), and decreased by 3.6% (2.6–4.6%) and 4.0% (2.6–5.4%) for unit increases above 80%. These results suggest that even in tropical countries without marked seasons, there are weather effects possibly reflecting Campylobacter potential to colonise its preferred host and/or survive in the environment.
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