Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 537605
Title Complex dynamics in the uptake of new farming practices : a case study for organic waste application
Author(s) Groeneveld, Anouschka; Bakker, Martha; Peerlings, Jack; Heijman, Wim
Source Journal of Environmental Planning and Management (2018). - ISSN 0964-0568 - 25 p.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1080/09640568.2018.1445619
Department(s) Agricultural Economics and Rural Policy Group
WASS
Land Use Planning
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Keyword(s) economies of scale - innovation - learning - regime shift - social norm
Abstract

Adverse environmental effects of intensive agriculture, together with scarcity in phosphates and water, urge farmers to find more sustainable practices. An example of such a sustainable practice is on-farm processing of organic waste. This paper explores three mechanisms that can lead to a widespread uptake of this technique: (1) economies of scale, (2) information sharing, and (3) adjustment of social norms. Although each of these mechanisms has been studied before, this paper provides new insights by considering the interactions that might exist between the different mechanisms when they are applied to real-life situations. Based on a pilot study, we developed a multi-criteria mathematical programming model at individual farm level. We used this model to simulate the uptake of on-farm processing of organic waste, as a result of the three mechanisms and their interactions. Our results show that each mechanism results in an increased uptake, but is not likely to cause a widespread uptake. Interaction between the mechanisms, will lead to a much higher uptake. This result suggests that simultaneous consideration of multiple mechanisms is essential to understand the behaviour of social–ecological systems.

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