Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 538192
Title Elements of fishing community resilience to climate change in the coastal zone of Bangladesh
Author(s) Sharifuzzaman, S.M.; Hossain, M.S.; Chowdhury, Sayedur Rahman; Sarker, Subrata; Chowdhury, M.S.N.; Chowdhury, M.Z.R.
Source Journal of Coastal Conservation 22 (2018)6. - ISSN 1400-0350 - p. 1167 - 1176.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s11852-018-0626-9
Department(s) Aquaculture and Fisheries
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Keyword(s) Analytic hierarchy process (AHP) - Fishing community - Hatiya Island - Livelihood assets - Resilience
Abstract

Resilience has been conceptualized in various ways by anthropologists, ecologists, systems scientists and engineers; the boundaries of resilience are subjective and context dependent. Consequently, choosing the standards and metrics for assessing resilience remains key challenges for policy makers. In this study, using multicriteria evaluation of 40 basic criteria of human, physical, financial, natural and social assets, we have identified several elements, such as experienced fishermen, natural abundance of hilsa (Tenualosa ilisha), ability to assert decision on fish selling, nets and boats ownership, social harmony and capacity of buying food as essential livelihood assets for the fishermen at Hatiya Island, Bangladesh. These assets may enhance the relative resilience of the fishing community of the island to climate change by as much as 20–40%. The results of this study will improve our understanding of the elements that lead to resilience at the community level.

Comments
There are no comments yet. You can post the first one!
Post a comment
 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.