Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 538402
Title Drought and soil fertility modify fertilization effects on aphid performance in wheat
Author(s) Tamburini, Giovanni; Gils, Stijn van; Kos, Martine; Putten, Wim van der; Marini, Lorenzo
Source Basic and Applied Ecology 30 (2018). - ISSN 1439-1791 - p. 23 - 31.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.baae.2018.05.010
Department(s) Nature Conservation and Plant Ecology
Laboratory of Nematology
PE&RC
EPS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Keyword(s) Agricultural intensification - Cereals - Climate change - Grain aphid - Nitrogen - Soil organic matter - Water availability
Abstract

Agricultural intensification and climate change are expected to affect pest performance through excessive inputs of chemical fertilizers and increased probability of extreme drought events. Potential interactive effects of fertilization and water availability on aboveground pest performance may depend on soil fertility because of its effect on nutrient availability. In a greenhouse experiment, we examined the effects of inorganic fertilization on the performance of the grain aphid (Sitobion avenae, F.), an important pest of wheat, under different conditions of soil fertility and water availability. We found soil fertility and water availability to influence the positive effects of inorganic fertilizers on aphid growth, i.e. fertilization promoted faster aphid development time and higher fecundity and biomass under low fertility and under well-watered conditions. Moreover, although increased soil fertility favored aphid growth under well-watered conditions, it simultaneously sustained plant development. The current practices promoting soil fertility do not have direct negative consequence on crop protection under conventional cropping systems.

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