Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 538422
Title Environmental Signals Influencing Myeloid Cell Metabolism and Function in Diabetes
Author(s) Ratter, Jacqueline M.; Tack, Cees J.; Netea, Mihai G.; Stienstra, Rinke
Source Trends in Endocrinology & Metabolism 29 (2018)7. - ISSN 1043-2760 - p. 468 - 480.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tem.2018.04.008
Department(s) Chair Nutrition Metabolism and Genomics
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Keyword(s) diabetes - immunometabolism - inflammation - macrophages
Abstract

The environment induces metabolic reprogramming of immune cells via specific signaling pathways. Recent studies have revealed that changes in cell metabolism affect key immune cell functions including cytokine production and migration. In diabetes, these functions are either insufficiently or excessively activated, translating into diabetes-associated complications, including increased susceptibility to infection and accelerated cardiovascular disease. Diabetes alters the abundance of environmental signals, including glucose, insulin, and lipids. Subsequently, changes in environmental signals drive metabolic reprogramming, impair immune cell function, and ultimately contribute to diabetes-associated complications. We review here recent studies on changes in innate immune cell metabolism, especially in myeloid cells, that are driven by environmental signals relevant to diabetes, and discuss therapeutic perspectives of targeting metabolism of immune cells in diabetes.

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