Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 538867
Title Understanding root, tuber, and banana seed systems and coordination breakdown : a multi-stakeholder framework
Author(s) Bentley, Jeffery W.; Andrade-Piedra, Jorge; Demo, Paul; Dzomeku, Beloved; Jacobsen, Kim; Kikulwe, Enoch; Kromann, Peter; Kumar, P.L.; McEwan, Margaret; Mudege, Netsayi; Ogero, Kwame; Okechukwu, Richardson; Orrego, Ricardo; Ospina, Bernardo; Sperling, Louise; Walsh, Stephen; Thiele, Graham
Source Journal of Crop Improvement 32 (2018)5. - ISSN 1542-7528 - p. 599 - 621.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1080/15427528.2018.1476998
Department(s) CDI advisory
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Keyword(s) Bananas and plantains - root crops - seed security - seed systems - tuber crops - vegetatively propagated crops (VPC)
Abstract

Vegetatively propagated crop (VPC) seed tends to remain true to varietal type but is bulky, often carries disease, and is slow to produce. So VPC seed needs to be handled differently than that of other crops, e.g., it tends to be sourced locally, often must be fresh, and it is less often sold on the market. Hence, a framework was adapted to describe and support interventions in such seed systems. The framework was used with 13 case studies to understand VPC seed systems for roots, tubers, and bananas, including differing roles and sometimes conflicting goals of stakeholders, and to identify potential coordination breakdowns when actors fail to develop a shared understanding and vision. In this article, we review those case studies. The framework is a critical tool to (a) document VPC seed systems and build evidence; (b) diagnose and treat coordination breakdown and (c) guide decision-makers and donors on the design of more sustainable seed system interventions for VPCs. The framework can be used to analyze past interventions and will be useful for planning future VPC seed programs.

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