Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 538912
Title Parasitic wasp-associated symbiont affects plant-mediated species interactions between herbivores
Author(s) Cusumano, Antonino; Zhu, Feng; Volkoff, Anne Nathalie; Verbaarschot, Patrick; Bloem, Janneke; Vogel, Heiko; Dicke, Marcel; Poelman, Erik H.
Source Ecology Letters 21 (2018)7. - ISSN 1461-023X - p. 957 - 967.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.12952
Department(s) Laboratory of Entomology
EPS
PE&RC
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Keyword(s) Herbivore colonisation - parasitoid - plant–insect interactions - polydnaviruses - tritrophic interactions
Abstract

Microbial mutualistic symbiosis is increasingly recognised as a hidden driving force in the ecology of plant–insect interactions. Although plant-associated and herbivore-associated symbionts clearly affect interactions between plants and herbivores, the effects of symbionts associated with higher trophic levels has been largely overlooked. At the third-trophic level, parasitic wasps are a common group of insects that can inject symbiotic viruses (polydnaviruses) and venom into their herbivorous hosts to support parasitoid offspring development. Here, we show that such third-trophic level symbionts act in combination with venom to affect plant-mediated interactions by reducing colonisation of subsequent herbivore species. This ecological effect correlated with changes induced by polydnaviruses and venom in caterpillar salivary glands and in plant defence responses to herbivory. Because thousands of parasitoid species are associated with mutualistic symbiotic viruses in an intimate, specific relationship, our findings may represent a novel and widespread ecological phenomenon in plant–insect interactions.

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