Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 539207
Title Forest devolution in Vietnam: From rhetoric to performance
Author(s) Dang, Thi Kim Phung; Visseren-Hamakers, I.J.; Arts, B.J.M.
Source Land Use Policy 77 (2018). - ISSN 0264-8377 - p. 760 - 774.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.landusepol.2018.06.008
Department(s) WASS
Forest and Nature Conservation Policy
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Abstract This paper discusses the performance of forest devolution, the major reform in forestry in developing countries over the last two decades. Although this change in forest governance has been studied by many scholars, the impacts of forest devolution and the various ways to measure them are still under discussion. This paper contributes to this discussion by evaluating the performance of a specific forest devolution policy, namely, forest land allocation (FLA) in Vietnam. The study is based on the policy arrangement approach to operationalize the
concept of ‘governance performance,’ and particularly focuses on the local people’s involvement in the policy. Overall, our findings from three regions of Vietnam reveal a medium governance performance for FLA. The main
explanation for this performance is the tradeoffs between the two key policy goals: forest rehabilitation and to increase local income. These tradeoffs are shaped by various factors, namely, the strategic use of forest rights by
target groups, social learning by state and nonstate actors, and unanticipated effects on the ground.
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