Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 539238
Title Effects of ecological and anthropogenic factors on waterbird abundance at a Ramsar Site in the Yangtze River Floodplain
Author(s) Zhang, Yong; Fox, Anthony D.; Cao, Lei; Jia, Qiang; Lu, Changhu; Prins, Herbert H.T.; Boer, Willem F. de
Source Ambio (2018). - ISSN 0044-7447 - 11 p.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s13280-018-1076-1
Department(s) Resource Ecology
PE&RC
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Keyword(s) Conservation - Feeding guilds - Waterbirds - Wetland management - Yangtze Wetlands
Abstract

Continuing declines in abundance of many waterbird species on wetland ecosystems require explanations to support effective management interventions. We used 6 year survey data from Shengjin Lake National Nature Reserve in the Yangtze River Floodplain, China, to study the effects of ecological and anthropogenic variables as determinants of waterbird species abundance. Our results showed that effects were guild-dependent, although distance to nearest human settlements had the largest adverse effects on bird abundance across all guilds. These results suggested that although the abundance of waterbird species could be affected by habitat conditions and buffalo grazing activities, Yangtze River Wetlands would most likely benefit most from reduced pressure from the proximity to the surrounding human population. We suggest that screening and/or restricting public access at some key sites may be the most cost-efficient way to restrict or reduce human activity in these wetlands, to improve the conservation status and wintering conditions for these waterbirds.

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