Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 539379
Title Relative importance of competition and plant–soil feedback, their synergy, context dependency and implications for coexistence
Author(s) Lekberg, Ylva; Bever, James D.; Bunn, Rebecca A.; Callaway, Ragan M.; Hart, Miranda M.; Kivlin, Stephanie N.; Klironomos, John; Larkin, Beau G.; Maron, John L.; Reinhart, Kurt O.; Remke, Michael; Putten, Wim H. van der
Source Ecology Letters 21 (2018)8. - ISSN 1461-023X - p. 1268 - 1281.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.13093
Department(s) Laboratory of Nematology
PE&RC
EPS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Keyword(s) Additive interaction - coexistence - competition - facilitation - meta-analysis - mutualist - pathogen - plant–soil feedback - resource gradient - soil biota
Abstract

Plants interact simultaneously with each other and with soil biota, yet the relative importance of competition vs. plant–soil feedback (PSF) on plant performance is poorly understood. Using a meta-analysis of 38 published studies and 150 plant species, we show that effects of interspecific competition (either growing plants with a competitor or singly, or comparing inter- vs. intraspecific competition) and PSF (comparing home vs. away soil, live vs. sterile soil, or control vs. fungicide-treated soil) depended on treatments but were predominantly negative, broadly comparable in magnitude, and additive or synergistic. Stronger competitors experienced more negative PSF than weaker competitors when controlling for density (inter- to intraspecific competition), suggesting that PSF could prevent competitive dominance and promote coexistence. When competition was measured against plants growing singly, the strength of competition overwhelmed PSF, indicating that the relative importance of PSF may depend not only on neighbour identity but also density. We evaluate how competition and PSFs might interact across resource gradients; PSF will likely strengthen competitive interactions in high resource environments and enhance facilitative interactions in low-resource environments. Finally, we provide a framework for filling key knowledge gaps and advancing our understanding of how these biotic interactions influence community structure.

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