Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 539471
Title On jet instability modes of a subsonic Hartmann whistle
Author(s) Varadharajan, Ramanathan; Kamin, Manu; Ganesh, Subramanian; Mathew, Joseph
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s12046-018-0921-z
Department(s) Physical Chemistry and Soft Matter
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Keyword(s) Hartmann whistle - jet-instability mode - large-eddy simulation - subsonic flow
Abstract

Numerical experiments to understand the resonant acoustic response of a subsonic jet impinging on the mouth of a tube, known as the Hartmann whistle configuration, were performed as large-eddy simulations. The tube length was chosen so that its fundamental duct mode, for one end closed and one end open, would match the dominant mode in the exciting jet. When the tube mouth was placed in the path of a regular stream of vortex rings, formed by the instability of the jet’s bounding shear layer, a strong resonant, tonal response (whistling) was obtained. At three diameters from the jet, OASPL was 150–160 dB. A tube with a thicker lip generated a louder response. When the tube was held closer to the nozzle exit, the impinging unsteady shear layer could not provoke any significant resonance. The simulations reveal that the tonal response of a Hartmann whistle operating in subsonic mode is significant.

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