Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 539489
Title Fifty Percent Human – how art brings us in touch with our microbial cohabitants
Author(s) Bäumel, Sonja; Tytgat, Hanne L.P.; Nemec, Birgit; Schmidt, Ruth; Chia, Loo W.; Smidt, Hauke
Source Microbial Biotechnology 11 (2018)4. - ISSN 1751-7907 - p. 571 - 574.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1111/1751-7915.13285
Department(s) Microbiological Laboratory
Chair Soil Biology and Biological Soil Quality
VLAG
WIMEK
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Abstract

The Human Microbiome, as well as the exploration of the microorganisms inhabiting the human body, are not only integral to the field of microbiology but represent an intrinsic part of all human beings. Consequently, along with scientists, artists have been inspired by the microbiome: transforming it in to tangible artefacts in order to critically question, reflect on and break down the barrier between humans and their microcohabitants. By artistic means, artists help us to understand how microbial research topics are inevitably affected by societal influences, including (health) politics, economics and the arts. Fifty Percent Human is a multidisciplinary artistic research project that aims to reshape our understanding of the human body and its environment as well as to explore possibilities for conscious coexistence in order to bridge the gap between science and society.

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