Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 539632
Title Intergovernmental relations for public health adaptation to climate change in the federalist states of Canada and Germany
Author(s) Austin, Stephanie E.; Ford, James D.; Berrang-Ford, Lea; Biesbroek, Robbert; Tosun, Jale; Ross, Nancy A.
Source Global environmental change : human and policy dimensions 52 (2018). - ISSN 0959-3780 - p. 226 - 237.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2018.07.010
Department(s) Public Administration and Policy
WASS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Keyword(s) Canada - Climate change adaptation - Federalism - Germany - Intergovernmental relations - Public health
Abstract

Climate change is a significant threat to public health, and governments at all scales will need to adapt to protect the health of their populations. The impacts of climate change are highly localized and thus federal systems theoretically have the inherent advantage of allowing for regional diversity and policy experimentation in adaptation. However, there are also higher levels of conflict and stalemates in federal systems than in unitary systems, complicating intergovernmental relations and coordination necessary for public health adaptation. We examine how intergovernmental dynamics are patterned across national, regional and local levels of government for public health adaptation to climate change, drawing upon semi-structured interviews (n = 28) in comparative embedded case studies of Canada and Germany. We find that coordination between levels of government specifically for climate change and health is rare, but climate change issues are occasionally discussed through working groups or through existing methods of public health coordination. These findings have implications for national and regional governments in federal systems seeking to enable sub-national public health adaptation to climate change and create synergies between levels of government.

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