Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 540722
Title Benthic biodiversity on old platforms, young wind farms, and rocky reefs
Author(s) Coolen, Joop W.P.; Weide, Babeth Van Der; Cuperus, Joël; Blomberg, Maxime; Moorsel, Godfried W.N.M. Van; Faasse, Marco A.; Bos, Oscar G.; Degraer, Steven; Lindeboom, Han J.
Source ICES Journal of Marine Science 2018 (2018). - ISSN 1054-3139 - 16 p.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1093/icesjms/fsy092
Department(s) Aquatic Ecology and Water Quality Management
IMARES Onderzoeksformatie
IMARES directie
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Keyword(s) Benthos - marine growth - platforms - reef - species richness - wind farm
Abstract The introduction of artificial hard substrates in an area dominated by a sandy seabed increases habitat available to epifouling organisms. To investigate this, samples were taken on old offshore oil and gas platforms, and data were compared with data of a young wind farm and a natural reef. Depth, sampling date, abundance of Mytilus edulis, Psammechinus miliaris, Metridium dianthus, and the presence of Tubulariidae and substrate (rock or steel) all correlated with species richness. Multivariate analysis showed a large overlap in communities on steel and rock and between the wind farm and platforms. The community changed over a gradient from deep rocks to shallow steel substrate, but no strong community differentiation was observed. Deep steel was more similar to natural rocks than shallow steel. When an artificial reef is intended to be colonized by communities similar to those on a natural reef, its structure should resemble a natural reef as much as possible.
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