Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 540830
Title Data, concepts and methods for large-n comparative climate change adaptation policy research : A systematic literature review
Author(s) Biesbroek, Robbert; Berrang-Ford, Lea; Ford, James D.; Tanabe, Andrew; Austin, Stephanie E.; Lesnikowski, Alexandra
Source Wiley interdisciplinary reviews: climate change (2018). - ISSN 1757-7780
DOI https://doi.org/10.1002/wcc.548
Department(s) Public Administration and Policy
WASS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Keyword(s) Climate change adaptation - Comparative policy - Data collection - Methods - Systematic review
Abstract

Climate change adaptation research is dominated by in-depth, qualitative, single- or small-n case studies that have resulted in rich and in-depth understanding on adaptation processes and decision making in specific locations. Recently, the number of comparative adaptation policy cases has increased, focusing on examining, describing, and/or explaining how countries, regions, and vulnerable groups are adapting across a larger sample of contexts and over time. There are, however, critical empirical, conceptual and methodological choices and challenges for comparative adaptation research. This article systematically captures and assesses the current state of larger-n (n≥20 cases) comparative adaptation policy literature. We systematically analyze 72 peer-reviewed articles to identify the key choices and challenges authors face when conducting their research. We find among others that almost all studies use nonprobability sampling methods, few existing comparative adaptation datasets exist, most studies use easy accessible data which might not be most appropriate for the research question, many struggle to disentangle rhetoric from reality in adaptation, and very few studies engage in critical reflection of their conceptual, data and methodological choices and the implications for their findings. We conclude that efforts to increase data availability and use of more rigorous methodologies are necessary to advance comparative adaptation research. This article is categorized under: Vulnerability and Adaptation to Climate Change > Learning from Cases and Analogies

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