Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 540842
Title The intractable challenge of evaluating cattle vaccination as a control for bovine tuberculosis
Author(s) Conlan, Andrew James Kerr; Vordermeier, Martin; Jong, Mart C.M. de; Wood, James L.N.
Source eLife 7 (2018). - ISSN 2050-084X
DOI https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.27694
Department(s) Quantitative Veterinary Epidemiology
WIAS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Abstract

Vaccination of cattle against bovine Tuberculosis (bTB) has been a long-term policy objective for countries where disease continues to persist despite costly test-and-slaughter programs. The potential use of vaccination within the European Union has been linked to a need for field evaluation of any prospective vaccine and the impact of vaccination on the rate of transmission of bTB. We calculate that estimation of the direct protection of BCG could be achieved with 100 herds, but over 500 herds would be necessary to demonstrate an economic benefit for farmers whose costs are dominated by testing and associated herd restrictions. However, the low and variable attack rate in GB herds means field trials are unlikely to be able to discern any impact of vaccination on transmission. In contrast, experimental natural transmission studies could provide robust evaluation of both the efficacy and mode of action of vaccination using as few as 200 animals.

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