Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Record number 540905
Title Survey of tools for measuring in vivo photosynthesis
Author(s) Walker, Berkley J.; Busch, Florian A.; Driever, Steven M.; Kromdijk, Johannes; Lawson, Tracy
Source In: Photosynthesis / Covshoff, Sarah, New York : Humana Press Inc. (Methods in Molecular Biology ) - ISBN 9781493977857 - p. 3 - 24.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-7786-4_1
Department(s) Centre for Crop Systems Analysis
Publication type Peer reviewed book chapter
Publication year 2018
Keyword(s) Chlorophyll fluorescence - CO exchange - O exchange - Online mass spectrometry - Photosynthesis
Abstract Measurements of in vivo photosynthesis are powerful tools that probe the largest fluxes of carbon and energy in an illuminated leaf, but often the specific techniques used are so varied and specialized that it is difficult for researchers outside the field to select and perform the most useful assays for their research questions. The goal of this chapter is to provide a broad overview of the current tools available for the study of in vivo photosynthesis so as to provide a foundation for selecting appropriate techniques, many of which are presented in detail in subsequent chapters. This chapter also organizes current methods into a comparative framework and provides examples of how they have been applied to research questions of broad agronomical, ecological, or biological importance. The chapter closes with an argument that the future of in vivo measurements of photosynthesis lies in the ability to use multiple methods simultaneously and discusses the benefits of this approach to currently open physiological questions. This chapter, combined with the relevant methods chapters, could serve as a laboratory course in methods in photosynthesis research or as part of a more comprehensive laboratory course in general plant physiology methods.
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