Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 541008
Title Insects as sources of iron and zinc in human nutrition
Author(s) Mwangi, Martin N.; Oonincx, Dennis G.A.B.; Stouten, Tim; Veenenbos, Margot; Melse-Boonstra, Alida; Dicke, Marcel; Loon, Joop J.A. Van
Source Nutrition Research Reviews (2018). - ISSN 0954-4224
DOI https://doi.org/10.1017/S0954422418000094
Department(s) Chair Nutrition and Health over the Lifecourse
VLAG
Laboratory of Entomology
PE&RC
EPS
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Keyword(s) Anaemia - Anti-nutritional factors - Bioavailability - Food preparation methods - Insects - Iron - Zinc
Abstract

Dietary deficiencies in Fe and Zn are globally widespread, causing serious health problems such as anaemia, poor pregnancy outcomes, increased risk of morbidity and mortality, stunted growth and impaired physical and cognitive development. Edible insects, of which a diversity of over 2000 species is available, are dietary components for about 2 billion individuals and are a valuable source of animal protein. In the present paper, we review the available information on Fe and Zn in edible insects and their potential as a source of these micronutrients for the rapidly growing human population. The levels of Fe and Zn present in eleven edible insect species that are mass-reared and six species that are collected from nature are similar to or higher than in other animal-based food sources. High protein levels in edible insect species are associated with high Fe and Zn levels. Fe and Zn levels are significantly positively correlated. Biochemically, Fe and Zn in insects occur predominantly in non-haem forms, bound to the proteins ferritin, transferrin and other transport and storage proteins. Knowledge gaps exist for bioavailability in the human alimentary tract, the effect of anti-nutritional factors in other dietary components such as grains on Fe and Zn absorption and the effect of food preparation methods. We conclude that edible insects present unique opportunities for improving the micronutrient status of both resource-poor and Western populations.

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