Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 541228
Title Sex differences in lipid metabolism are affected by presence of the gut microbiota
Author(s) Baars, Annemarie; Oosting, Annemarie; Lohuis, Mirjam; Koehorst, Martijn; Aidy, Sahar El; Hugenholtz, Floor; Smidt, Hauke; Mischke, Mona; Boekschoten, Mark V.; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Garssen, Johan; Beek, Eline M. van der; Knol, Jan; Vos, Paul de; Bergenhenegouwen, Jeroen van; Fransen, Floris
Source Scientific Reports 8 (2018)1. - ISSN 2045-2322
DOI https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-31695-w
Department(s) Host Microbe Interactomics
Microbiological Laboratory
VLAG
WIMEK
Chair Nutrition Metabolism and Genomics
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Abstract

Physiological processes are differentially regulated between men and women. Sex and gut microbiota have each been demonstrated to regulate host metabolism, but it is unclear whether both factors are interdependent. Here, we determined to what extent sex-specific differences in lipid metabolism are modulated via the gut microbiota. While male and female Conv mice showed predominantly differential expression in gene sets related to lipid metabolism, GF mice showed differences in gene sets linked to gut health and inflammatory responses. This suggests that presence of the gut microbiota is important in sex-specific regulation of lipid metabolism. Further, we explored the role of bile acids as mediators in the cross-talk between the microbiome and host lipid metabolism. Females showed higher total and primary serum bile acids levels, independent of presence of microbiota. However, in presence of microbiota we observed higher secondary serum bile acid levels in females compared to males. Analysis of microbiota composition displayed sex-specific differences in Conv mice. Therefore, our data suggests that bile acids possibly play a role in the crosstalk between the microbiome and sex-specific regulation of lipid metabolism. In conclusion, our data shows that presence of the gut microbiota contributes to sex differences in lipid metabolism.

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