Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 541891
Title Phylogeography and population dynamics of the white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus acutus) in the North Atlantic
Author(s) Banguera-Hinestroza, E.; Evans, P.G.H.; Mirimin, L.; Reid, R.J.; Mikkelsen, B.; Couperus, A.S.; Deaville, R.; Rogan, E.; Hoelzel, A.R.
Source Conservation Genetics 15 (2014)4. - ISSN 1566-0621 - p. 789 - 802.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1007/s10592-014-0578-z
Department(s) IMARES Vis
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2014
Abstract Highly mobile species in the marine environment may be expected to show little differentiation at the population level, but this is often not the case. Instead cryptic population structure is common, and effective conservation will require an understanding of how these patterns evolve. Here we present an assessment from both sides of the North Atlantic of differentiation among populations of a dolphin species that inhabits mainly pelagic waters, the Atlantic white-sided dolphin. We compare eleven putative populations in the western and eastern North Atlantic at mtDNA and microsatellite DNA loci and find reduced nucleotide diversity and signals for historical bottlenecks and post-bottleneck expansions in all regions. We calculate expansion times to have occurred during the early Holocene, following the last glacial maximum (LGM). We find evidence for connectivity among populations from either side of the North Atlantic, and differentiation between putative populations in the far northeast compared with all other areas sampled. Some data suggest the possibility of separate refugia during the LGM explaining this pattern, although ongoing ecological processes may also be a factor. We discuss the implications for developing effective programs of conservation and management in the context of ongoing anthropogenic impact.
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