Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 545375
Title The minute-scale dynamics of online emotions reveal the effects of affect labeling
Author(s) Fan, Rui; Varol, Onur; Varamesh, Ali; Barron, Alexander; Leemput, I.A. van de; Scheffer, M.; Bollen, J.L.T.
Source Nature Human Behaviour (2018). - ISSN 2397-3374
DOI https://doi.org/10.1038/s41562-018-0490-5
Department(s) WIMEK
Aquatic Ecology and Water Quality Management
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 2018
Abstract Putting one’s feelings into words (also called affect labeling) can attenuate positive and negative emotions. Here, we track the evolution of specific emotions for 74,487 Twitter users by analysing the emotional content of their tweets before and after they explicitly report experiencing a positive or negative emotion. Our results describe the evolution of emotions and their expression at the temporal resolution of one minute. The expression of positive emotions is preceded by a short, steep increase in positive valence and followed by short decay to normal levels. Negative emotions, however, build up more slowly and are followed by a sharp reversal to previous levels, consistent with previous studies demonstrating the attenuating effects of affect labeling. We estimate that positive and negative emotions last approximately 1.25 and 1.5 h, respectively, from onset to evanescence. A separate analysis for male and female individuals suggests the potential for gender-specific differences in emotional dynamics.
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