Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Record number 63783
Title Immobilisation of humic acids and binding of nitrophenol to immobilised humics
Author(s) Yang, Y.H.; Koopal, L.K.
Source Colloids and Surfaces. A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects 151 (1999). - ISSN 0927-7757 - p. 201 - 212.
DOI https://doi.org/10.1016/S0927-7757(98)00579-2
Department(s) Physical Chemistry and Colloid Science
Publication type Refereed Article in a scientific journal
Publication year 1999
Abstract A new method has been developed for the immobilisation of humic acids on silica. After using 3-aminopropyl-dimethyl-ethoxysilane to prepare aminopropyl silica, humic acids can be irreversibly bound to the aminopropyl silica. The remaining amino groups on the silica are successfully end-capped using a CH3COONa-EDC method. The products have iso-electric points at low pH and are stable in a wide range of pH.The sorption isotherms of paranitrophenol (PNP) onto immobilised Aldrich humic acid show that pH and salt concentration do not affect the sorption of PNP at pH<6, but at higher pH values the sorbed amount decreases strongly. The PNP sorption can be described with a competitive Langmuir equation extended with electrostatic interactions. The strong decrease in sorption at high pH is due to both the electrostatic repulsion between the negatively charged HA and the negative PNP species and the fact that the concentration of the neutral PNP species decreases.
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