Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Systematic review on cashew nut allergy
Valk, J.P.M. van der; Dubois, A.E.J. ; Wichers, H.J. ; Jong, N.W. de; Wijk, R. van - \ 2014
Allergy 69 (2014). - ISSN 0105-4538 - p. 692 - 698.
cross-reactivity - pistachio nut - clinical-features - peanut allergy - children - anaphylaxis - food - vicilin - family - ige
Recent studies on cashew nut allergy suggest that the prevalence of cashew nut allergy is increasing. Cashew nut consumption by allergic patients can cause severe reactions, including anaphylaxis. This review summarizes current knowledge on cashew nut allergy to facilitate timely clinical recognition and to promote awareness of this emerging food allergy amongst clinicians. The goal of this study is to present a systematic review focused on the clinical aspects of allergy to cashew nut including the characteristics of cashew nut, the prevalence, allergenic components, cross-reactivity, diagnosis and management of cashew nut allergy. The literature search yielded 255 articles of which 40 met our selection criteria and were considered to be relevant for this review. The 40 articles included one prospective study, six retrospective studies and seven case reports. The remaining 26 papers were not directly related to cashew nut allergy. The literature suggests that the prevalence of cashew nut allergy is increasing, although the level of evidence for this is low. A minimal amount of cashew nut allergen may cause a severe allergic reaction, suggesting high potency comparable with other tree nuts and peanuts. Cashew allergy is clearly an underestimated important healthcare problem, especially in children.
Breeding performance of the Grasshopper Buzzard (Butastur rufipennis) in a natural and a human-modified West African savanna
Buij, R. ; Kortekaas, K. ; Krimpen, R.R.D. ; Wijk, H.J. van; Zanden, S. ; Iongh, H.H. de; Heitkonig, I.M.A. ; Snoo, G.R. de; Komdeur, J. - \ 2013
Condor 115 (2013)1. - ISSN 0010-5422 - p. 47 - 57.
nest-site selection - owls asio-otus - land-use - climate-change - survival estimation - raptor community - protected areas - arid savanna - habitat - success
Few studies have examined raptor reproduction in response to land-use change in sub-Saharan Africa, hampering conservation efforts to address regional declines. To further our understanding of mechanisms underlying the dramatic declines of West African raptors, we examined the relationship between environmental conditions, nest density, and measures of reproduction in the Grasshopper Buzzard (Butastur rufipennis). Analyses were based on 244 nest sites divided between transformed and natural habitat in northern Cameroon. At the landscape scale, nest density increased with the density of preferred nest trees. Nests were more widely spaced in transformed than in natural habitat. Dispersion was adjusted to differences in availability of small mammals, which was negatively associated with distance to nearest neighbor, and in the area under cultivation, which was positively associated with distance to nearest neighbor. Productivity was positively associated with rainfall, canopy shielding the nest, availability of grasshoppers, and the nest's visibility from ground level; canopy shielding, grass cover, rainfall, and distance to nearest neighbor were positively associated with nest success. In natural habitat, losses of eggs and nestlings to natural predators were greater than in transformed habitats, while losses through human predation were small. Productivity and nest success were unaffected by land use because of the opposing effects of greater predation pressure, closer spacing of nests, and more food in natural habitat than in transformed habitat. Thus transformed habitat may provide adequate breeding habitat for the Grasshopper Buzzard, but declining rainfall and intensifying anthropogenic land use are likely to affect future reproductive output
Movement characteristics of the Common hamster (Cricetus cricetus) in Limburg, the Netherlands
Wijk, R. van; Haye, M.J.J. la; Kats, R.J.M. van; Muskens, G.J.D.M. - \ 2011
In: Proceedings of the 16t and 17th Meeting of the International Hamster Workgroup; Ranis, Germany (2009), Gödollo, Hungary (2010) - p. 79 - 92.
Validation of the QTL on SSC4 for meat and carcass quality traits in a commercial crossbred pig population
Slawinska, A. ; Siwek, M. ; Knol, E.F. ; Roelofs-Prins, D.T. ; Wijk, H.J. van; Dibbits, B.W. ; Bednarczyk, M. - \ 2009
Journal of Animal Breeding and Genetics 126 (2009)1. - ISSN 0931-2668 - p. 43 - 51.
influencing economic traits - sus-scrofa chromosome-4 - genome scan analysis - landrace cross - loci - fatness - growth - confirmation - identification - linkage
Porcine chromosome 4 harbours many quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting meat quality, fatness and carcass composition traits, detected in resource pig populations previously. However, prior to selection in commercial breeds, QTL identified in an intercross between divergent breeds require confirmation, so that they can be segregated. Consequently, the objective of this study was to validate several QTL on porcine chromosome 4 responsible for meat and carcass quality traits. The experimental population consisted of 14 crossbred paternal half-sib families. The region of investigation was the q arm of SSC4 flanked by the markers S0073 and S0813. Regression analysis resulted in the validation of three QTL within the interval: Minolta a* loin, back fat thickness and the weight of trimmed ham. The results were additionally confirmed by factor analysis. Candidate genes were proposed for meat colour, which was the most evident QTL validated in this study.
Mapping carcass and meat quality QTL on Sus Scrofa chromosome 2 in commercial finishing pigs
Heuven, H.C.M. ; Wijk, H.J. van; Dibbits, B.W. ; Kampen, A.J.A. van; Knol, A.J. ; Bovenhuis, H. - \ 2009
Genetics, Selection, Evolution 41 (2009). - ISSN 0999-193X - 8 p.
quantitative trait loci - pietrain resource population - combined linkage - pork quality - intramuscular fat - muscle mass - large white - igf2 locus - identification - genome
Quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting carcass and meat quality located on SSC2 were identified using variance component methods. A large number of traits involved in meat and carcass quality was detected in a commercial crossbred population: 1855 pigs sired by 17 boars from a synthetic line, which where homozygous (A/A) for IGF2. Using combined linkage and linkage disequilibrium mapping (LDLA), several QTL significantly affecting loin muscle mass, ham weight and ham muscles (outer ham and knuckle ham) and meat quality traits, such as Minolta-L* and -b*, ultimate pH and Japanese colour score were detected. These results agreed well with previous QTL-studies involving SSC2. Since our study is carried out on crossbreds, different QTL may be segregating in the parental lines. To address this question, we compared models with a single QTL-variance component with models allowing for separate sire and dam QTL-variance components. The same QTL were identified using a single QTL variance component model compared to a model allowing for separate variances with minor differences with respect to QTL location. However, the variance component method made it possible to detect QTL segregating in the paternal line (e.g. HAMB), the maternal lines (e.g. Ham) or in both (e.g. pHu). Combining association and linkage information among haplotypes improved slightly the significance of the QTL compared to an analysis using linkage information only.
In silico identification and mapping of microsatellite markers on Sus scrofa chromosome 4
Wijk, H.J. van; Liefers, S.C. ; Buschbell, H. ; Dibbits, B.W. ; Harlizius, B. ; Groenen, M.A.M. - \ 2007
Animal Biotechnology 18 (2007)4. - ISSN 1049-5398 - p. 251 - 261.
carcass composition - porcine genome - linkage map
Apolipoprotein B (APOB) serves an essential role in the assembly and secretion of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and lipids transport. This study was designed to clone the full-length cDNA of the chicken APOB gene, to characterize the expression profile, and investigate the differential expression between layer and broiler of the chicken APOB gene. The full-length cDNA sequence (14,150-bp) that contained a 13,896-bp ORF encoding 4,631 amino acids was obtained by RT-PCR, RACE, and bioinformatics analysis. qReal-Time PCR analysis showed that the chicken APOB gene was highly expressed in kidney, liver, and intestine. The results of differential expression showed that the APOB gene was more highly expressed in intestine and kidney in Bai'er layer than in broiler, but there was no significant difference in liver between the two breeds. The results of this study provided basic molecular information for studying the role of APOB in the energy transportation in avian species.
Variance component analysis of quantitative trait loci for pork carcass composition and meat quality on SSC4 and SSC11
Wijk, H.J. van; Dibbits, B.W. ; Liefers, S.C. ; Buschbell, H. ; Harlizius, B. ; Heuven, H.C.M. ; Knol, E.F. ; Bovenhuis, H. ; Groenen, M.A.M. - \ 2007
Journal of Animal Science 85 (2007). - ISSN 0021-8812 - p. 22 - 30.
linkage disequilibrium - milk-production - intramuscular fat - qtl detection - pig - populations - descent - location - identity - genome
In a previous study, QTL for carcass composition and meat quality were identified in a commercial finisher cross. The main objective of the current study was to confirm and fine map the QTL on SSC4 and SSC11 by genotyping an increased number of individuals and markers and to analyze the data using a combined linkage and linkage disequilibrium analysis method. A modified version of the method excludes linkage disequilibrium information from the analysis, enabling the comparison of results based on linkage information only or results based on combined linkage and linkage disequilibrium information. Nine additional paternal half-sib families were genotyped for 18 markers, resulting in a total of 1,855 animals genotyped for 15 and 13 markers on SSC4 and SSC11, respectively. The QTL affecting meat color on SSC4 was confirmed, whereas the QTL affecting LM weight could not be confirmed. The combined linkage and linkage disequilibrium analysis resulted in the identification of new significant effects for 14 traits on the 2 chromosomes. Heritabilities of the QTL effects ranged from 1.8 to 13.2%. The analysis contributed to a more accurate positioning of QTL and further characterized their phenotypic effect. However, results showed that even greater marker densities are required to take full advantage of linkage disequilibrium information and to identify haplotypes associated with favorable QTL alleles
The Genetics of Pork Quality
Wijk, H.J. van - \ 2006
Wageningen University. Promotor(en): Martien Groenen, co-promotor(en): Henk Bovenhuis. - [S.l.] : S.n. - ISBN 9085045045 - 176
varkens - varkensvlees - vleeskwaliteit - karkassamenstelling - genetica - genetische parameters - loci voor kwantitatief kenmerk - genoomanalyse - genkartering - merkers - pigs - pigmeat - meat quality - carcass composition - genetics - genetic parameters - quantitative trait loci - genome analysis - gene mapping - markers
Fine-mapping of a meat color QTL on sus scrofa chromosome 4q
Wijk, H.J. van; Dibbits, B.W. ; Arts, J.A.J. ; Harlizius, B. ; Knol, E.F. ; Bovenhuis, H. ; Groenen, M.A.M. - \ 2006
For fine mapping of a QTL affecting meat color, a large paternal half-sib crossbred population (n=1855) was typed for a total of 41 markers spanning SSC4q. The markers include 26 new developed microsatellites identified by in silico mining of porcine BAC-end sequences with a significant Blast-hit to a 67 Mb homologous region on human chromosome 1. Analysis of the data with the combined linkage and linkage disequilibrium (LD) method refined the position of the QTL, although the contribution of LD was still limited. A comparison of results with linkage analysis only with combined LDLA approaches is given.
Identification of quantitative trait loci for carcass composition and meat quality traits in a commercial finishing cross
Wijk, H.J. van; Dibbits, B.W. ; Baron, E.E. ; Brings, A.D. ; Harlizius, B. ; Groenen, M.A.M. ; Knol, E.F. ; Bovenhuis, H. - \ 2006
Journal of Animal Science 84 (2006)4. - ISSN 0021-8812 - p. 789 - 799.
influencing economic traits - large white intercross - genome scan analysis - pig skeletal-muscle - sus-scrofa - meat quality - body-composition - glycogen-content - igf2 locus - qtl
A QTL study for carcass composition and meat quality traits was conducted on finisher pigs of a cross between a synthetic Pie¿train/Large White boar line and a commercial sow cross. The mapping population comprised 715 individuals evaluated for a total of 30 traits related to growth and fatness (4 traits), carcass composition (11 traits), and meat quality (15 traits). Offspring of 8 sires (n = 715) were used for linkage analysis and genotyped for 73 microsatellite markers covering 14 chromosomal regions representing approximately 50% of the pig genome. The regions examined were selected based on previous studies suggesting the presence of QTL affecting carcass composition or meat quality traits. Thirty-two QTL exceeding the 5% chromosome-wise significance level were identified. Among these, 5 QTL affecting 5 different traits were significant at the 1% chromosome-wise level. The greatest significance levels were found for a QTL affecting loin weight on SSC11 and a QTL with an effect on the Japanese color scale score of the loin on SSC4. About one-third of the identified QTL were in agreement with QTL previously reported. Results showed that QTL affecting carcass composition and meat quality traits segregated within commercial lines. Use of these results for marker-assisted selection offers opportunities for improving pork quality by within-line selection
PigDB; a new pig genome database
Wijk, H.J. van; Kampen, A.J.A. van; Harlizius, B. ; Merks, J.W.M. ; Groenen, M.A.M. - \ 2005
Knowledge of farm animal genomes increased incredible over the last decennium. The information is publicly available for a variety of species and through specific databases such as for pigs; PiGBASE for mapping data, Pig EST Database, TIGR SsGI for genes and data on their expression patterns and the INRA Comparative and Cytogenetic mapping home pages. In potential these databases provide comprehensive public repositories for genome research. Some data however are stored on a stationary manner or no longer up to date. These data are difficult to combine from the different sources or with private data, but also with genome data of model organisms. This strongly hinders comparative mapping. A new pig genome database ¿ PigDB was set up to enable these combinations. With the establishment of direct links with data in existing farm animal databases but also databases like LocusLink, Genbank, MGI, GeneCards an efficient comparative mapping with human and mouse will be enabled. With data analysis tools and other databases, PigDB will be integrated in a farm animal genome research support software package in development, the Farm Animal Bioinformatics Platform.
Genetic Parameters for carcass composition and pork quality estimated in a commercial production chain
Wijk, H.J. van; Arts, D.J.G. ; Matthews, J.O. ; Webster, M. ; Ducro, B.J. ; Knol, E.F. - \ 2005
Journal of Animal Science 83 (2005)2. - ISSN 0021-8812 - p. 324 - 333.
feed-efficiency traits - large white-pigs - lean meat yield - reproduction - growth
Breeding goals in pigs are subject to change and are directed much more toward retail carcass yield and meat quality because of the high economic value of these traits. The objective of this study was to estimate genetic parameters of growth, carcass, and meat quality traits. Carcass components included ham and loin weights as primal cuts, which were further dissected into boneless subprimal cuts. Meat quality traits included pH, drip loss, purge, firmness, and color and marbling of both ham and loin. Phenotypic measurements were collected on a commercial crossbred pig population (n = 1,855). Genetic parameters were estimated using REML procedures applied to a bivariate animal model. Heritability estimates for carcass traits varied from 0.29 to 0.51, with 0.39 and 0.51 for the boneless subprimals of ham and loin, respectively. Heritability estimates for meat quality traits ranged from 0.08 to 0.28, with low estimates for the water holding capacity traits and higher values for the color traits: Minolta b*(0.14), L* (0.15), a* (0.24), and Japanese color scale (0.25). Heritability estimates differed for marbling of ham (0.14) and loin (0.31). Neither backfat nor ADG was correlated with loin depth (rg = 0.0), and their mutual genetic correlation was 0.27. Loin primal was moderately correlated with ham primal (rg = 0.31) and more strongly correlated with boneless ham (rg = 0.58). Backfat was negatively correlated with (sub)primal cut values. Average daily gain was unfavorably correlated with subprimals and with most meat quality characteristics measured. Genetic correlations among the color measurements and water-holding capacity traits were high (average rg = 0.70), except for Minolta a* (average rg = 0.17). The estimated genetic parameters indicate that meat quality and valuable cut yields can be improved by genetic selection. The estimated genetic parameters make it possible to predict the response to selection on performance, carcass, and meat quality traits and to design an effective breeding strategy fitting pricing systems based on retail carcass and quality characteristics
PACE: An integrated pig genome database
Merks, W.M. ; Kampen, T.J.A. van; Wijk, H.J. van; Harlizius, B. ; Rattink, A.P. ; Albers, G. ; Groenen, M.A.M. - \ 2004
Poultry Science 83 (2004)Suppl. 1. - ISSN 0032-5791 - p. (905) - (905).
Knowledge of farm animal genomes has increased enormously over the last decade. A large part if this information is publicly available for a variety of species and through specific databases such as for pigs; PiGBASE for mapping data, Pig EST Database, TIGR SsGI for genes and data on their expression patterns and the INRA Comparative and Cytogenetic mapping home pages. Potentially these databases provide comprehensive public repositories for genome research. However, these data are difficult to combine from the different sources or with private data, but also with genome data of model organisms. This strongly hinders comparative mapping and positional fine-mapping. A new pig genome database - PACE was set up in the Netherlands to enable integration of data from the different sources. For this, the widespread database system of AceDB has been adapted and links with existing farm animal databases but also databases like LocusLink, Genbank, MGI, GeneCards are included to facilitate an efficient comparative mapping with human and mouse. In addition published information on porcine QTL has been included. This database with more than 5000 genetic markers and loci
PACE: An integrated pig genome database
Merks, W.M. ; Kampen, T.J.A. van; Wijk, H.J. van; Harlizius, B. ; Rattink, A.P. ; Albers, G. ; Groenen, M.A.M. - \ 2004
Journal of Dairy Science 87 (2004)Suppl. 1. - ISSN 0022-0302 - p. (905) - (905).
Knowledge of farm animal genomes has increased enormously over the last decade. A large part if this information is publicly available for a variety of species and through specific databases such as for pigs; PiGBASE for mapping data, Pig EST Database, TIGR SsGI for genes and data on their expression patterns and the INRA Comparative and Cytogenetic mapping home pages. Potentially these databases provide comprehensive public repositories for genome research. However, these data are difficult to combine from the different sources or with private data, but also with genome data of model organisms. This strongly hinders comparative mapping and positional fine-mapping. A new pig genome database - PACE was set up in the Netherlands to enable integration of data from the different sources. For this, the widespread database system of AceDB has been adapted and links with existing farm animal databases but also databases like LocusLink, Genbank, MGI, GeneCards are included to facilitate an efficient comparative mapping with human and mouse. In addition published information on porcine QTL has been included. This database with more than 5000 genetic markers and loci
PACE: An integrated pig genome database
Merks, W.M. ; Kampen, T.J.A. van; Wijk, H.J. van; Harlizius, B. ; Rattink, A.P. ; Albers, G. ; Groenen, M.A.M. - \ 2004
Journal of Animal Science 82 (2004)Suppl. 1. - ISSN 0021-8812 - p. (905) - (905).
Knowledge of farm animal genomes has increased enormously over the last decade. A large part if this information is publicly available for a variety of species and through specific databases such as for pigs; PiGBASE for mapping data, Pig EST Database, TIGR SsGI for genes and data on their expression patterns and the INRA Comparative and Cytogenetic mapping home pages. Potentially these databases provide comprehensive public repositories for genome research. However, these data are difficult to combine from the different sources or with private data, but also with genome data of model organisms. This strongly hinders comparative mapping and positional fine-mapping. A new pig genome database - PACE was set up in the Netherlands to enable integration of data from the different sources. For this, the widespread database system of AceDB has been adapted and links with existing farm animal databases but also databases like LocusLink, Genbank, MGI, GeneCards are included to facilitate an efficient comparative mapping with human and mouse. In addition published information on porcine QTL has been included. This database with more than 5000 genetic markers and loci and about 500 QTL¿s will be available publicly from July 2004
Genomics for food safety and sustainable animal production
Harlizius, B. ; Wijk, H.J. van; Merks, J.W.M. - \ 2004
Journal of Biotechnology 113 (2004)1-3. - ISSN 0168-1656 - p. 33 - 42.
quantitative trait loci - leukocyte adhesion deficiency - meat quality traits - linkage map - dairy-cattle - muscle mass - photoperiod sensitivity - antibody-response - holstein cattle - flowering time
There is a growing concern in society about the safety of animal-derived food, the health and welfare of farm animals and the sustainability of current animal production systems. Along farm animal, breeding genomics may contribute to a solution for these concerns. The use of genomic analysis tools, to achieve genetic progress in typical out-bred populations of farm animals, seems to be more difficult compared to `model` organisms or plants. However, identification of positional candidate genes may be accelerated by linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping. Recording of sustainable traits requires a large financial and logistic input and the economic advantages for the market are not as clear as for traditional selection traits. Examples show that the major genes causing variability for similar traits in different species are rarely the same. Therefore, for breeding purposes genomic analysis of the species of interest is needed. The fundamental knowledge obtained on the genetic architecture of complex traits will open new perspectives for the use of DNA tests in selection schemes. For food safety and traceability, DNA-based techniques evolve for monitoring and early warning systems
Pig Ace: an integrated pig genome database
Merks, J.W.M. ; Kampen, A.J.A. van; Wijk, H.J. van; Harlizius, B. ; Rattink, A.P. ; Albers, G.A. ; Groenen, M.A.M. - \ 2004
FABIB: Farm Animal Bioinformatics Platform
Wijk, H.J. van; Rattink, A.P. ; Mullaart, E. ; Lintel Hekkert, B. te; Harlizius, B. ; Groenen, M.A.M. ; Bink, M.C.A.M. ; Georges, M. ; Leunissen, J. ; Merks, J.W.M. ; Albers, G.A. ; Nap, J.P.H. - \ 2003
Combining traditional breeding and genomics to improve pork quality
Heuven, H.C.M. ; Wijk, H.J. van; Arendonk, J.A.M. van - \ 2003
Outlook on Agriculture 32 (2003)4. - ISSN 0030-7270 - p. 235 - 239.
meat quality - pigs - locus
Breeding or improved pork quality has been the focus of much research in recent years and some of the results have already been put into practice. The realized genetic response in pork quality to selection within lines has generally been limited, however, compared with the responses obtained for other traits. The relatively limited progress has been caused by lack of incentive to producers from industry, lack of clear definition of pork quality, high costs of collection of pork quality estimates, and consequently limited availability of phenotypic measures. The discovery of the HAL gene has greatly helped the elimination of alleles with a negative effect on pork quality. There are now proposals to integrate traditional and molecular breeding methods to improve pork quality. Implementation of such an integrated breeding strategy requires close cooperation between breeding organizations and slaughterhouses. This cooperation should help to provide clear incentives to producers and for the collection of data needed for the selection of optimal breed Aine combinations and the creation of genetic improvements.
FABIP: A Farm Animal Bioinformatics Platform
Rattink, A.P. ; Wijk, H.J. van; Mullaart, E. ; Lintel Hekkert, B. te; Harlizius, B. ; Groenen, M.A.M. ; Bink, M.C.A.M. ; Georges, M. ; Leunissen, J.A.M. ; Merks, J. ; Albers, G.A. ; Nap, J.P.H. - \ 2003
In: Book of Abstracts 3rd European Poultry Genetics Symposium, Wageningen, the Netherlands, 17-19 September 2003 - p. 77 - 77.
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