Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

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Global lack of flyway structure in a cosmopolitan bird revealed by a genome wide survey of single nucleotide polymorphisms
Kraus, R.H.S. ; Hooft, W.F. van; Megens, H.J.W.C. ; Tsvey, A. ; Fokin, S.Y. ; Ydenberg, R.C. ; Prins, H.H.T. - \ 2013
Molecular Ecology 22 (2013)1. - ISSN 0962-1083 - p. 41 - 55.
maximum-likelihood-estimation - mallard anas-platyrhynchos - influenza-a viruses - population-structure - mitochondrial-dna - phylogenetic networks - coalescent approach - genetic-structure - biased dispersal - white sharks
Knowledge about population structure and connectivity of waterfowl species, especially mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), is a priority because of recent outbreaks of avian influenza. Ringing studies that trace large-scale movement patterns have to date been unable to detect clearly delineated mallard populations. We employed 363 single nucleotide polymorphism markers in combination with population genetics and phylogeographical approaches to conduct a population genomic test of panmixia in 801 mallards from 45 locations worldwide. Basic population genetic and phylogenetic methods suggest no or very little population structure on continental scales. Nor could individual-based structuring algorithms discern geographical structuring. Model-based coalescent analyses for testing models of population structure pointed to strong genetic connectivity among the world's mallard population. These diverse approaches all support the conclusion that there is a lack of clear population structure, suggesting that the world's mallards, perhaps with minor exceptions, form a single large, mainly interbreeding population.
Widespread horizontal genomic exchange does not erode species barriers among sympatric ducks
Kraus, R.H.S. ; Kerstens, H.H.D. ; Hooft, W.F. van; Megens, H.J.W.C. ; Elmberg, J. ; Tsvey, A. ; Sartakov, D. ; Soloviev, S.A. ; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A. ; Groenen, M.A.M. ; Ydenberg, R.C. ; Prins, H.H.T. - \ 2012
BMC Evolutionary Biology 12 (2012). - ISSN 1471-2148 - 10 p.
mallards anas-platyrhynchos - multilocus genotype data - linkage disequilibrium - population-structure - phylogenetic-relationships - hybridization patterns - finite population - miocene climate - waterfowl aves - average number
The study of speciation and maintenance of species barriers is at the core of evolutionary biology. During speciation the genome of one population becomes separated from other populations of the same species, which may lead to genomic incompatibility with time. This separation is complete when no fertile offspring is produced from inter-population matings, which is the basis of the biological species concept. Birds, in particular ducks, are recognised as a challenging and illustrative group of higher vertebrates for speciation studies. There are many sympatric and ecologically similar duck species, among which fertile hybrids occur relatively frequently in nature, yet these species remain distinct
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