Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Pre-diagnostic vitamin D concentrations and cancer risks in older individuals: an analysis of cohorts participating in the CHANCES consortium
Ordonez-Mena, J.M. ; Schöttker, B. ; Fedirko, V. ; Jenab, M. ; Olsen, A. ; Halkjaer, J. ; Kampman, E. ; Groot, C.P.G.M. de; Jansen, E. ; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B. ; Peeters, P.H. - \ 2016
European Journal of Epidemiology 31 (2016)3. - ISSN 0393-2990 - p. 311 - 323.
The associations of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations with total and site-specific cancer incidence have been examined in several epidemiological studies with overall inconclusive findings. Very little is known about the association of vitamin D with cancer incidence in older populations. We assessed the association of pre-diagnostic serum 25(OH)D levels with incidence of all cancers combined and incidence of lung, colorectal, breast, prostate and lymphoid malignancies among older adults. Pre-diagnostic 25(OH)D concentrations and cancer incidence were available in total for 15,486 older adults (mean age 63, range 50–84 years) participating in two cohort studies: ESTHER (Germany) and TROMSØ (Norway); and a subset of previously published nested-case control data from a another cohort study: EPIC-Elderly (Greece, Denmark, Netherlands, Spain and Sweden) from the CHANCES consortium on health and aging. Cox proportional hazards or logistic regression were used to derive multivariable adjusted hazard and odds ratios, respectively, and their 95 % confidence intervals across 25(OH)D categories. Meta-analyses with random effects models were used to pool study-specific risk estimates. Overall, lower 25(OH)D concentrations were not significantly associated with increased incidence of most of the cancers assessed. However, there was some evidence of increased breast cancer and decreased lymphoma risk with higher 25(OH)D concentrations. Our meta-analyses with individual participant data from three large European population-based cohort studies provide at best limited support for the hypothesis that vitamin D may have a major role in cancer development and prevention among European older adults.
Dietary intake of vitamin d and calcium and breast cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition
Abbas, S. ; Linseisen, J. ; Rohrmann, S. ; Chang-Claude, J. ; Peeters, P.H. ; Engel, P. ; Brustad, M. ; Lund, E. ; Skeie, G. ; Duijnhoven, F.J.B. van - \ 2013
Nutrition and Cancer 65 (2013)2. - ISSN 0163-5581 - p. 178 - 187.
french e3n cohort - dairy-products - sunlight exposure - adolescent diet - women - micronutrients - calibration - metaanalysis - prevention
Studies assessing the effects of vitamin D or calcium intake on breast cancer risk have been inconclusive. Furthermore, few studies have evaluated them jointly. This study is the largest so far examining the association of dietary vitamin D and calcium intake with breast cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. During a mean follow-up of 8.8 yr, 7760 incident invasive breast cancer cases were identified among 319,985 women. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for pre- and postmenopausal breast cancer risk. Comparing the highest with the lowest quintile of vitamin D intake, HR and 95% CI were 1.07 (0.87–1.32) and 1.02 (0.90–1.16) for pre- and postmenopausal women, respectively. The corresponding HR and 95% CIs for calcium intake were 0.98 (0.80–1.19) and 0.90 (0.79–1.02), respectively. For calcium intake in postmenopausal women, the test for trend was borderline statistically significant (Ptrend = 0.05). There was no significant interaction between vitamin D and calcium intake and cancer risk (Pinteraction = 0.57 and 0.22 in pre- and postmenopausal women, respectively). In this large prospective cohort, we found no evidence for an association between dietary vitamin D or calcium intake and breast cancer risk.
Early life factors and adult mammographic density
Lokate, M. ; Duijnhoven, F.J.B. van; Berg, S.W. van den; Peeters, P.H. ; Gils, C.H. van - \ 2013
Cancer Causes and Control 24 (2013)10. - ISSN 0957-5243 - p. 1771 - 1778.
breast-cancer risk - reported birth-weight - perinatal characteristics - parenchymal patterns - women - metaanalysis - cohort - etiology - validity - stem
Purpose Early life factors have shown to be related to breast cancer risk. The pathophysiological link could be mammographic density, a strong risk factor for breast cancer. Mammary gland development already starts in utero and early life factors might affect the number of mammary cells at risk. In this study, we investigated the association between early life factors and mammographic density in adulthood. Methods The study was conducted within 2,588, mainly postmenopausal women of the Prospect-European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. This ongoing study recruited breast cancer screening participants who filled out extensive questionnaires. Information on the early life factors birth weight, gestational age, maternal and paternal age, multiple births, birth rank, exposure to parental smoking, and leg length as a proxy for growth at childhood was obtained using questionnaires. Generalized linear models and linear regression models were used to study the relation between early life factors and mammographic density. Analyses were adjusted for potential confounders. Results Women who had an older mother (p = 0.06) or father (p = 0.002) at birth tended to have a higher mammographic density. Furthermore, greater leg length seemed to be related to higher mammographic density, although not statistically significantly (p = 0.16). After adjustment for confounders, none of the early life factors showed any statistically significant relationship with mammographic density in adulthood. Conclusion Although we cannot exclude small effects that go undetected due to measurement error in recall of early life factors, the results suggest that mammographic density is not a major pathway in any observed relationship between these early life events and breast cancer risk.
Educational level and risk of colorectal cancer in EPIC with specific reference to tumor location
Leufkens, A.M. ; Duijnhoven, F.J.B. van; Boshuizen, H.C. ; Sierseman, P.D. ; Kunst, A.E. ; Mouw, T. ; Tjonneland, A. ; Olsen, A. ; Overvad, K. ; Boutron-Ruault, M.C. ; Clavel-Chapelon, F. ; Morois, S. ; Krogh, V. ; Tumino, R. ; Panico, S. ; Polidoro, S. ; Palli, D. ; Kaaks, R. ; Teucher, B. ; Pischon, T. ; Trichopoulou, A. ; Orfanos, P. ; Goufa, I. ; Peeters, P.H. ; Skeie, G. ; Braaten, T. ; Rodriguez, L. ; Lujan-Barroso, L. ; Sanchez-Perez, M.J. ; Navarro, C. ; Barricarte, A. ; Zackrisson, S. ; Almquist, M. ; Hallmans, G. ; Palmqvist, R. ; Tsilidis, K.K. ; Khaw, K.T. ; Wareham, N. ; Gallo, V. ; Jenab, M. ; Riboli, E. ; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B. - \ 2012
International Journal of Cancer 130 (2012)3. - ISSN 0020-7136 - p. 622 - 630.
socioeconomic-status - united-states - nutrition - colon - survival - health - women - inequalities - deprivation - rectum
Existing evidence is inconclusive on whether socioeconomic status (SES) and educational inequalities influence colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, and whether low or high SES/educational level is associated with developing CRC. The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between educational level and CRC. We studied data from 400,510 participants in the EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition) study, of whom 2,447 developed CRC (colon: 1,551, rectum: 896, mean follow-up 8.3 years). Cox proportional hazard regression analysis stratified by age, gender and center, and adjusted for potential confounders were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). Relative indices of inequality (RII) for education were estimated using Cox regression models. We conducted separate analyses for tumor location, gender and geographical region. Compared with participants with college/university education, participants with vocational secondary education or less had a nonsignificantly lower risk of developing CRC. When further stratified for tumor location, adjusted risk estimates for the proximal colon were statistically significant for primary education or less (HR 0.73, 95%CI 0.57–0.94) and for vocational secondary education (HR 0.76, 95%CI 0.58–0.98). The inverse association between low education and CRC risk was particularly found in women and Southern Europe. These associations were statistically significant for CRC, for colon cancer and for proximal colon cancer. In conclusion, CRC risk, especially in the proximal colon, is lower in subjects with a lower educational level compared to those with a higher educational level. This association is most pronounced in women and Southern Europe
Variety in vegetable and fruit consumption and the risk of gastric and esophageal cancer in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition
Jeurnink, S.M. ; Büchner, F.L. ; Bueno-de Mesquita, H.B. ; Siersema, P.D. ; Boshuizen, H.C. ; Numans, M.E. ; Dahm, C.C. ; Overvad, K. ; Tjonneland, A. ; Roswall, N. ; Clavel-Chapelon, F. ; Boutron-Ruault, M.C. ; Morois, S. ; Kaaks, R. ; Teucher, B. ; Boeing, H. ; Buijsse, B. ; Trichopoulou, A. ; Benetou, V. ; Zylis, D. ; Palli, D. ; Sieri, S. ; Vineis, P. ; Tumino, R. ; Panico, S. ; Ocké, M.C. ; Peeters, P.H. ; Skeie, G. ; Brustad, M. ; Lund, E. ; Sanchez-Cantalejo, E. ; Navarro, C. ; Amiano, P. ; Ardanaz, E. ; Ramón Quirós, J. ; Hallmans, G. ; Johansson, I. ; Lindkvist, B. ; Regnér, S. ; Khaw, K.T. ; Wareham, N. ; Key, T.J. ; Slimani, N. ; Norat, T. ; Vergnaud, A.C. ; Romaguera, D. ; Gonzalez, C.A. - \ 2012
International Journal of Cancer 131 (2012)6. - ISSN 0020-7136 - p. E963 - E973.
epic-eurgast - epidemiologic evidence - helicobacter-pylori - physical-activity - diet diversity - cereal fiber - vitamin-c - stomach - adenocarcinomas - metaanalysis
Diets high in vegetables and fruits have been suggested to be inversely associated with risk of gastric cancer. However, the evidence of the effect of variety of consumption is limited. We therefore investigated whether consumption of a variety of vegetables and fruit is associated with gastric and esophageal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Data on food consumption and follow-up on cancer incidence were available for 452,269 participants from 10 European countries. After a mean follow-up of 8.4 years, 475 cases of gastric and esophageal adenocarcinomas (180 noncardia, 185 cardia, gastric esophageal junction and esophagus, 110 not specified) and 98 esophageal squamous cell carcinomas were observed. Diet Diversity Scores were used to quantify the variety in vegetable and fruit consumption. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazard models to calculate risk ratios. Independent from quantity of consumption, variety in the consumption of vegetables and fruit combined and of fruit consumption alone were statistically significantly inversely associated with the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (continuous hazard ratio per 2 products increment 0.88; 95% CI 0.79–0.97 and 0.76; 95% CI 0.62–0.94, respectively) with the latter particularly seen in ever smokers. Variety in vegetable and/or fruit consumption was not associated with risk of gastric and esophageal adenocarcinomas. Independent from quantity of consumption, more variety in vegetable and fruit consumption combined and in fruit consumption alone may decrease the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. However, residual confounding by lifestyle factors cannot be excluded
A risk model for lung cancer incidence
Hoggart, C. ; Brennan, P. ; Tjonneland, A. ; Vogel, U. ; Overvad, K. ; Ostergaard, J.N. ; Kaaks, R. ; Canzian, F. ; Boeing, H. ; Steffen, A. ; Trichopoulou, A. ; Bamia, C. ; Trichopoulos, D. ; Johansson, M. ; Palli, D. ; Krogh, V. ; Tumino, R. ; Sacerdote, C. ; Panico, S. ; Boshuizen, H.C. ; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B. ; Peeters, P.H. ; Lund, E. ; Gram, I.T. ; Braaten, T. ; Rodrígues, L. ; Agudo, A. ; Sánchez-Cantalejo, E. ; Arriola, L. ; Chirlaque, M.D. ; Barricarte, A. ; Rasmuson, T. ; Khaw, K.T. ; Wareham, N. ; Allen, N.E. ; Riboli, E. ; Vineis, P. - \ 2012
Cancer Prevention Research / American Association for Cancer Research 5 (2012)6. - ISSN 1940-6207 - p. 834 - 846.
body-mass index - susceptibility locus - smoking-cessation - cigarette-smoking - prediction model - smokers - mortality - women - association - 5p15.33
Risk models for lung cancer incidence would be useful for prioritizing individuals for screening and participation in clinical trials of chemoprevention. We present a risk model for lung cancer built using prospective cohort data from a general population which predicts individual incidence in a given time period. We build separate risk models for current and former smokers using 169,035 ever smokers from the multicenter European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) and considered a model for never smokers. The data set was split into independent training and test sets. Lung cancer incidence was modeled using survival analysis, stratifying by age started smoking, and for former smokers, also smoking duration. Other risk factors considered were smoking intensity, 10 occupational/environmental exposures previously implicated with lung cancer, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms at two loci identified by genome-wide association studies of lung cancer. Individual risk in the test set was measured by the predicted probability of lung cancer incidence in the year preceding last follow-up time, predictive accuracy was measured by the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC). Using smoking information alone gave good predictive accuracy: the AUC and 95% confidence interval in ever smokers was 0.843 (0.810-0.875), the Bach model applied to the same data gave an AUC of 0.775 (0.737-0.813). Other risk factors had negligible effect on the AUC, including never smokers for whom prediction was poor. Our model is generalizable and straightforward to implement. Its accuracy can be attributed to its modeling of lifetime exposure to smoking.
Cigarette smoking and colorectal cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study.
Leufkens, A.M. ; Duijnhoven, F.J.B. van; Siersema, P.D. ; Boshuizen, H.C. ; Vrieling, A. ; Agudo, A. ; Gram, I.T. ; Weiderpass, E. ; Dahm, C. ; Overvad, K. ; Tjonneland, A. ; Olsen, A. ; Boutron-Ruault, M.C. ; Clavel-Chapelon, F. ; Morois, S. ; Palli, D. ; Grioni, S. ; Tumino, R. ; Sacerdote, C. ; Mattiello, A. ; Herman, S. ; Kaaks, R. ; Steffen, A. ; Boeing, H. ; Trichopoulou, A. ; Lagiou, P. ; Trichopoulos, D. ; Peeters, P.H. ; Gils, C.H. van; Kranen, H. van; Lund, E. ; Dumeaux, V. ; Engeset, D. ; Rodriguez, L. ; Sanchez, M.J. ; Chirlaque, M.D. ; Barricarte, A. ; Manjer, J. ; Almquist, M. ; Guelpen, B. ; Hallmans, G. ; Khaw, K.T. ; Wareham, N. ; Tsilidis, K.K. ; Straif, K. ; Leon-Roux, M. ; Vineis, P. ; Norat, T. ; Riboli, E. ; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B. - \ 2011
Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology 9 (2011)2. - ISSN 1542-3565 - p. 137 - 144.
tumor microsatellite instability - life-style factors - alcohol-consumption - rectal-cancer - colon tumors - cohort - women - polymorphisms - associations - metaanalysis
BACKGROUND & AIMS: There has been consistent evidence for a relationship between smoking and colorectal cancer (CRC), although it is not clear whether the colon or rectum is more sensitive to the effects of smoking. We investigated the relationships between cigarette smoking and risk of CRC and tumor location. METHODS: We analyzed data from 465,879 participants in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study; 2741 developed CRC during the follow-up period (mean, 8.7 years). Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: The risk of colon carcinoma was increased among ever smokers (HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.06-1.32) and former cigarette smokers (HR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.08-1.36), compared with never smokers; the increased risk for current smokers was of borderline significance (HR, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.98-1.31). When stratified for tumor location, the risk of proximal colon cancer was increased for former (HR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.04-1.50) and current smokers (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.06-1.64), but the risks for cancers in the distal colon or rectum were not. Subsite analyses showed a nonsignificant difference between the proximal and distal colon (P = .45) for former smokers and a significant difference for current smokers (P = .02). For smokers who had stopped smoking for at least 20 years, the risk of developing colon cancer was similar to that of never smokers. CONCLUSIONS: Ever smokers have an increased risk of colon cancer, which appeared to be more pronounced in the proximal than the distal colon location.
Consumption of meat and fish and risk of lung cancer: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition
Linseisen, J. ; Rohrmann, S. ; Bueno-de-Mesquita, B. ; Büchner, F.L. ; Boshuizen, H.C. ; Agudo, A. ; Gram, I.T. ; Dahm, C.C. ; Overvad, K. ; Egeberg, R. ; Tjonneland, A. ; Boeing, H. ; Steffen, A. ; Kaaks, R. ; Lukanova, A. ; Berrino, F. ; Palli, D. ; Panico, S. ; Tumino, R. ; Ardanaz, E. ; Dorronsoro, M. ; Huerta, J.M. ; Rodríguez, L. ; Sánchez, M.J. ; Rasmuson, T. ; Hallmans, G. ; Manjer, J. ; Wirfält, E. ; Engeset, D. ; Skeie, G. ; Katsoulis, M. ; Oikonomou, E. ; Trichopoulou, A. ; Peeters, P.H. ; Khaw, K.T. ; Wareham, N. ; Allen, N. ; Key, T. ; Brennan, P. ; Romieu, I. ; Slimani, N. ; Vergnaud, A.C. ; Xun, W.W. ; Vineis, P. ; Riboli, E. - \ 2011
Cancer Causes and Control 22 (2011)6. - ISSN 0957-5243 - p. 909 - 918.
heterocyclic amines - dietary habits - heme iron - women - calibration - cohort - recalls - mortality - mutagens - fat
Evidence from case–control studies, but less so from cohort studies, suggests a positive association between meat intake and risk of lung cancer. Therefore, this association was evaluated in the frame of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, EPIC. Data from 478,021 participants, recruited from 10 European countries, who completed a dietary questionnaire in 1992–2000 were evaluated; 1,822 incident primary lung cancer cases were included in the present evaluation. Relative risk estimates were calculated for categories of meat intake using multi-variably adjusted Cox proportional hazard models. In addition, the continuous intake variables were calibrated by means of 24-h diet recall data to account for part of the measurement error. There were no consistent associations between meat consumption and the risk of lung cancer. Neither red meat (RR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.89–1.27 per 50 g intake/day; calibrated model) nor processed meat (RR = 1.13, 95% CI 0.95–1.34 per 50 g/day; calibrated model) was significantly related to an increased risk of lung cancer. Also, consumption of white meat and fish was not associated with the risk of lung cancer. These findings do not support the hypothesis that a high intake of red and processed meat is a risk factor for lung cancer
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