Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Records 1 - 6 / 6

  • help
  • print

    Print search results

  • export

    Export search results

  • alert
    We will mail you new results for this query: metisnummer==1135921
Check title to add to marked list
Making sense of innovation processes in african smallholder agricullture
Triomphe, B. ; Floquet, A. ; Kamau, G. ; Letty, B. ; Almekinders, C.J.M. ; Waters-Bayer, A. - \ 2016
In: Innovation systems / Francis, J., Mytelka, L., van Huis, A., Röling, N., Wageningen : The Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation (CTA) - ISBN 9789290815617 - p. 170 - 182.
The European-funded Framework Programme 7 project, Joint Learning in Innovation Systems in African Agriculture (JOLISAA), assessed agricultural innovation experiences focused on smallholders in Benin, Kenya, and South Africa. Fifty-six cases were characterized through review of grey literature and interviews with resource persons, according to a common analytical framework inspired by the innovation systems (IS) perspective. Thirteen of the cases were assessed in greater depth through semi-structured interviews, focus group discussions and multistakeholder workshops. The cases covered a wide diversity of experiences in terms of types, domains, scales, timelines, initiators of innovation and stakeholders involved. Findings revealed multiple triggers and drivers of innovation. For external stakeholders, key triggers included likelihood of offering a technological fix to an existing problem and availability of funding. For local people, access to input and output markets was a powerful trigger and driver. Market types and dynamics varied greatly. Developing functional value chains and accessing markets proved particularly challenging, especially for poorer and weakly organized farmers. Over long periods, determinants of innovation changed dynamically and often unpredictably, including motivations of key stakeholders, triggers, drivers and stakeholder arrangements. The direction of innovation evolved, often moving from a technology entry point to more organizational or institutional issues. A recurring challenge for fostering innovation is whether and how to build on local initiatives and knowledge, and how to sustain externally driven innovation processes beyond the project time frame. A major conclusion from JOLISAA is that innovation has to be seen as a continuously evolving process of ‘innovation bundles’ (a combination of different types of innovation) of various kinds, rather than as a pre-planned, and usually, narrowly-defined technical intervention. Consequently, open-ended, flexible approaches to innovation are needed with the potential to engage meaningfully over a long time with local stakeholders and bearers of local innovation dynamics, so that they take full charge of the innovation process and direction.
Capacity to innovate from a system CGIAR research program perspective
Leeuwis, C. ; Schut, M. ; Waters-Bayer, A. ; Mur, R. ; Atta-Krah, K. ; Douthwaite, B. - \ 2014
Penang, Malaysia : CGIAR
Multi-stakeholder innovation processes in African smallholder farming: key lessons and policy recommendations from Benin, Kenya and South Africa
Triomphe, B. ; Floquet, A. ; Waters-Bayer, A. ; Kamau, G. ; Berg, J. van den; Letty, B. ; Mongbo, R. ; Crane, T. ; Almekinders, C.J.M. ; Sellamna, N. ; Vodouhe, S.D. ; Oudwater, N. - \ 2014
In: Proceedings of the International Workshop on Agricultural Innovation Systems in Africa: Innovation in smallholder farming in Africa: recent advances and recommendations. - Montpellier : CIRAD - p. 44 - 55.
Within the context of the European-funded JOLISAA FP7 project (JOint Learning in Innovation Systems in African Agriculture), several agricultural innovation experiences focused on smallholders were assessed in Benin, Kenya and South Africa. Fifty-six cases were characterised through review of grey literature and interviews with resource persons according to a common analytical framework inspired by the innovation systems perspective. Of these, 13 were assessed in greater depth through semistructured interviews, focus-group discussions and multistakeholder workshops. The cases cover a wide diversity of experiences in terms of types, domains, scales, timelines, initiators of innovation and stakeholders involved. Findings indicate that innovation triggers and drivers were multiple. For external stakeholders, likelihood of offering a technological fix to an existing problem and availability of funding were key triggers. For local people, access to input and output markets was a powerful trigger and driver. Market types and dynamics varied greatly. Developing functional value chains and accessing (often erratic) markets proved challenging especially for poorer and weakly organised farmers. Over long periods, many determinants of innovation change dynamically and often unpredictably during the process, including motivations of key stakeholders, triggers, drivers and stakeholder arrangements. The direction of innovation evolves, usually moving from a technology entry point to more organisational or institutional innovation. A recurring challenge for making interventions is whether and how these build on local initiatives and knowledge before engaging in innovation development. Another challenge lies in sustaining innovation processes that have been externally initiated and conducted within a protected environment, once the project stops. The conclusion is that innovation has to be seen as a continuously evolving bundle of innovations of various kinds, rather than as a pre-planned and usually narrowly defined intervention. Consequently, open-ended, flexible approaches to innovation development are needed with the potential to engage meaningfully over a long time with local stakeholders, so that they take full charge of the innovation process and direction.
Innovation in smallholder farming in Africa: recent advances & recommendations : proceedings of the international workshop on agricultural innovation systems in Africa (AISA), 29–31 May 2013, Nairobi, Kenya
Triomphe, B. ; Waters-Bayer, A. ; Klerkx, L.W.A. ; Schut, M.L.W. ; Cullen, B. ; Kamau, G. - \ 2014
Montpellier : CIRAD - 229
What does an inventory of recent innovation experiences tell us about agricultural innovation in Africa?
Triomphe, B. ; Floquet, A. ; Kamau, G. ; Letty, B. ; Vodouche, S.D. ; Ng’ang’a, T. ; Stevens, J. ; Berg, J. van den; Selemna, N. ; Bridier, B. ; Crane, T.A. ; Almekinders, C.J.M. ; Waters-Bayer, A. ; Hocdé, H. - \ 2013
The Journal of Agricultural Education and Extension 19 (2013)3. - ISSN 1389-224X - p. 311 - 324.
Purpose: Within the context of the European-funded JOLISAA project (JOint Learning in and about Innovation Systems in African Agriculture), an inventory of agricultural innovation experiences was made in Benin, Kenya and South Africa. The objective was to assess multi-stakeholder agricultural innovation processes involving smallholders. Approach: Country-based teams used bibliographic searches, interviews with resource persons and field visits to identify cases. The inventory was developed iteratively according to a common analytical framework and guidelines inspired by the innovation system perspective. Findings and practical implications: The completed inventory includes 57 documented cases, covering a wide diversity of experiences, in terms of types, domains, scales and timelines of innovation. The inventory confirms the diversity of stakeholders involved in innovation, the diversity of innovation triggers and drivers, and the frequent occurrence of market-driven innovation. It also illustrates more original features: the typically long timeframes of innovation processes; the common occurrence of ‘innovation bundles’; and an often tight yet ambivalent relationship between innovation initiatives and externally funded projects. National teams faced several challenges during the inventory process, for example, in gaining a common understanding and making consistent use of key innovation-related concepts, and in accessing relevant information, as some case holders were reluctant to share their experience freely. Originality/value: The JOLISAA inventory contributes to illustrating that African agriculture is responding actively to the many challenges it faces. Documenting and sharing such a palpable dynamism may help to counter some of the pessimism and negative publicity that African agriculture usually attracts and to increase the motivation of many for making innovation happen across Africa
Effectiveness of innovation grants to smallholder agricultural producers: an explorative systematic review
Ton, G. ; Grip, K. de; Klerkx, L.W.A. ; Rau, M.L. ; Douma, M. ; Friis-Hansen, E. ; Triomphe, B. ; Waters-Bayer, A. ; Wongtschowski, M. - \ 2013
London : EPPI-Centre, Social Science Research Unit, Institute of Education, University of London - ISBN 9781907345548 - 115
premies - verbeteringssubsidies - boeren - innovaties - familiebedrijven, landbouw - grants - improvement grants - farmers - innovations - family farms
Grants for agricultural innovation are common but grant funds specifically targeted to smallholder farmers remain relatively rare. Nevertheless, they are receiving increasing recognition as a promising venue for agricultural innovation. They stimulate smallholders to experiment with improved practices, to become proactive and to engage with research and extension providers. The systematic review covered three modalities of disbursing these grants to smallholder farmers and their organisations: vouchers, competitive grants and farmer-led innovation support funds. The synthesis covers, among others, innovation grant systems in Malawi (Agricultural Input Subsidy Programme), Latin America (several Challenge Funds for Farmer Groups), Uganda (National Agricultural Advisory Services ), and Colombia (Local Agricultural Research Committees - CIAL).
Check title to add to marked list

Show 20 50 100 records per page

 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.