Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Current refinement(s):

Records 1 - 20 / 128

  • help
  • print

    Print search results

  • export

    Export search results

  • alert
    We will mail you new results for this query: keywords==Mus musculus
Check title to add to marked list
Hepatic Sel1L-Hrd1 ER-Associated Degradation (ERAD) manages FGF21 levels and systemic metabolism via CREBH
Bhattacharya, Asmita ; Sun, Shengyi ; Wang, Heting ; Liu, Ming ; Long, Qiaoming ; Yin, Lei ; Kersten, A.H. ; Zhang, Kezhong ; Qi, Ling - \ 2018
GSE118658 - PRJNA486359 - Mus musculus
Fibroblast growth factor 21 (Fgf21) is a liver-derived, fasting-induced hormone with broad effects on growth, nutrient metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Here, we report the discovery of a novel mechanism regulating Fgf21 expression under growth and fasting-feeding. The Sel1LHrd1 complex is the most conserved branch of mammalian endoplasmic reticulum (ER)- associated degradation (ERAD) machinery. Mice with liver-specific deletion of Sel1L exhibit growth retardation with markedly elevated circulating Fgf21, reaching levels close to those in Fgf21 transgenic mice or pharmacological models. Mechanistically, we show that the Sel1LHrd1 ERAD complex controls Fgf21 transcription by regulating the ubiquitination and turnover (and thus nuclear abundance) of ER-resident transcription factor Crebh, while having no effect on the other well-known Fgf21 transcription factor Pparα. Our data reveal a physiologically regulated, inverse correlation between Sel1L-Hrd1 ERAD and Crebh-Fgf21 levels under fasting-feeding and growth. This study not only establishes the importance of Sel1L-Hrd1 ERAD in the liver in the regulation of systemic energy metabolism, but also reveals a novel hepatic “ERADCrebh- Fgf21” axis directly linking ER protein turnover to gene transcription and systemic metabolic regulation.
MicroRNA-382 silencing induces a mitonuclear protein imbalance and activates the mitochondrial unfolded protein response in muscle cells
Hoeks, Joris ; Schrauwen, P. ; Houzelle, Alexandre ; Dahlmans, Dennis ; Andreux, Pénélope ; Wang, Xu ; Jörgensen, Johanna A. ; Moullan, Norman ; Daemen, Sabine ; Kersten, A.H. ; Auwerx, Johan - \ 2018
GSE116786 - PRJNA480248 - Mus musculus
Proper mitochondrial function plays a central role in cellular metabolism. Various diseases as well as aging are associated with diminished mitochondrial function. Previously, we identified 19 miRNAs putatively involved in the regulation of mitochondrial metabolism in skeletal muscle, a highly metabolically active tissue. In the present study, these 19 miRNAs were individually silenced in C2C12 myotubes using antisense oligonucleotides, followed by measurement of the expression of 27 genes known to play a major role in regulating mitochondrial metabolism. Based on the outcomes, we then focused on miR-382-5p and identified pathways affected by its silencing using microarrays, investigated protein expression and studied cellular respiration. Silencing of miRNA-382-5p significantly increased the expression of several genes involved in mitochondrial dynamics and -biogenesis. Microarray analysis of C2C12 myotubes silenced for miRNA-382-5p revealed a collective downregulation of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and respiratory chain proteins. This effect was accompanied by an imbalance between mitochondrial proteins encoded by the nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (1.35-fold, p<0.01) and an induction of HSP60 protein (1.31-fold, p<0.05), indicating activation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (mtUPR). Furthermore, silencing of miR-382-5p reduced basal oxygen consumption rate by 14% (p<0.05) without affecting mitochondrial content, pointing towards a more efficient mitochondrial function as a result of improved mitochondrial quality control. Taken together, silencing of miR-382-5p induces a mitonuclear protein imbalance and activates the mtUPR in skeletal muscle, a phenomenon that was previously associated with improved longevity.
Marginal selenium deficiency down-regulates inflammation-related genes in splenic leukocytes of the mouse
Kipp, A.P. ; Banning, A. ; Brigelius, R. ; Keijer, J. ; Schothorst, E.M. van - \ 2018
GSE117026 - PRJNA480872 - Mus musculus
Moderate selenium deficiency may lead to an impaired capacity to cope with health challenges. Functional effects of suboptimal selenium intake are not fully known, and biomarkers for an insufficient selenium supply are inadequate. We therefore fed mice diets of moderately deficient or adequate selenium intake for 6 weeks. Changes in global gene expression were monitored by microarray analysis in splenic leukocytes. Genes for four selenoproteins, Sepw1, Gpx1, Selh and Sep15, were the most significantly down-regulated in moderate selenium deficiency, and this was confirmed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Classification of significantly affected genes revealed that processes related to inflammation, heme biosynthesis, DNA replication and transcription, cell cycle and transport were affected by selenium restriction. Down-regulation by moderate selenium deficiency of specific genes involved in inflammation and heme biosynthesis was confirmed by qPCR. Myeloperoxidase and lysozyme activities were decreased in selenium-restricted leukocytes, providing evidence for functional consequences. Genes for 31 nuclear factor (NF)-κB targets were down-regulated in moderate selenium deficiency, indicating an impaired NF-κB signaling. Together, the observed changes point to a disturbance in inflammatory response. The selenoproteins found here to be sensitive to selenium intake in murine leukocytes might also be useful as biomarkers for a moderate selenium deficiency in humans.
Four selenoproteins, protein biosynthesis, and Wnt signalling are particularly sensitive to limited selenium intake in mouse colon
Kipp, A. ; Banning, A. ; Brigelius, R. ; Keijer, J. ; Schothorst, E.M. van - \ 2018
GSE117025 - PRJNA480871 - Mus musculus
Selenium is an essential micronutrient. Its recommended daily allowance is not attained by a significant proportion of the population in many countries and its intake has been suggested to affect colorectal carcinogenesis. Therefore, microarrays were used to determine how both selenoprotein and global gene expression patterns in the mouse colon were affected by marginal selenium deficiency comparable to variations in human dietary intakes. Two groups of 12 mice each were fed a selenium-deficient (0.086mg Se/kg) or a selenium-adequate (0.15mg Se/kg) diet. After 6wk, plasma selenium level, liver, and colon glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in the deficient group was 12, 34, and 50%, respectively, of that of the adequate group. Differential gene expression was analysed with mouse 44K whole genome microarrays. Pathway analysis by GenMAPP identified the protein biosynthesis pathway as most significantly affected, followed by inflammation, Delta-Notch and Wnt pathways. Selected gene expression changes were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. GPx1 and the selenoproteins W, H, and M, responded significantly to selenium intake making them candidates as biomarkers for selenium status. Thus, feeding a marginal selenium-deficient diet resulted in distinct changes in global gene expression in the mouse colon. Modulation of cancer-related pathways may contribute to the higher susceptibility to colon carcinogenesis in low selenium status.
A comparative miRNA/mRNA analysis in distinct murine liver cancer models reveals miR-193a-5p and NUSAP1 as therapeutic targets in HCC
Roy, Sanchari ; Hooiveld, G.J.E.J. ; Roderburg, Christoph ; Luedde, Tom - \ 2018
GSE102418 - Mus musculus - PRJNA397719
This SuperSeries is composed of the SubSeries listed below.
A comparative miRNA/mRNA analysis in distinct murine liver cancer models reveals miR-193a-5p and NUSAP1 as therapeutic targets in HCC [mRNA]
Roy, Sanchari ; Hooiveld, G.J.E.J. ; Roderburg, Christoph ; Luedde, Tom - \ 2018
GSE102416 - Mus musculus - PRJNA397721
Background & aims: We performed an integrated analysis to identify microRNAs (miRNAs) and mRNAs with altered expression in liver tumors from 3 mouse models of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and human tumor tissues. Methods: We analyzed miRNA and mRNA expression profiles of liver tissues from mice with diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis, conditional expression of lymphotoxin alpha and lymphotoxin beta , or inducible expression of a Myc transgene (Tet-O-Myc mice), as well as male C57BL/6 mice (controls). miRNA mimics were expressed and miRNAs and mRNAs were knocked down in human (Huh7, Hep3B, JHH2) hepatoma cell lines; cells were analyzed for viability, proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion. Cells were grown as xenograft tumors in nude mice and analyzed. We combined in-silico target gene prediction with mRNA profiles from all 3 mouse models. We quantified miRNA levels in 146 fresh-frozen tissues from patients (125 HCCs, 17 matched non-tumor tissues, and 4 liver samples from patients without cancer) and published human data sets and tested correlations with patient survival times using Kaplan-Meier curves and the log-rank test. Levels of NUSAP1 mRNA were quantified in 237 HCCs and 5 non-tumor liver samples using the Taqman assay. Results: Levels of the microRNA 193a-5p (MIR193A-5p) were reduced in liver tumors from all 3 mouse tumor models and in human HCC samples, compared with non-tumor liver tissues. Expression of a MIR193A-5p mimic in hepatoma cells reduced proliferation, survival, migration, and invasion and their growth as xenograft tumors in nude mice. We found nucleolar and spindle associated protein 1 (NUSAP1) to be a target of MIR193A-5p; HCC cells and tissues with low levels of MIR193A-5p had increased expression of NUSAP1. Increased levels of NUSAP1 in HCC samples correlated with shorter survival times of patients. Knockdown of NUSAP1 in Huh7 cells reduced proliferation, survival, migration, and growth as xenograft tumors in nude mice. Hydrodynamic tail-vein injections of a small hairpin RNA against NUSAP1 reduced growth of AKT1-MYC-induced tumors in mice. Conclusions: MIR193A-5p appears to prevent liver tumorigenesis by reducing levels of NUSAP1. Levels of MIR193A-5p are reduced in mouse and human HCC cells and tissues, leading to increased levels of NUSAP1, associated with shorter survival times of patients. Integrated analyses of miRNAs and mRNAs in tumors from mouse models can lead to identification of therapeutic targets in humans.
A comparative miRNA/mRNA analysis in distinct murine liver cancer models reveals miR-193a-5p and NUSAP1 as therapeutic targets in HCC [miRNA]
Roy, Sanchari ; Hooiveld, G.J.E.J. ; Roderburg, Christoph ; Luedde, Tom - \ 2018
GSE102417 - Mus musculus - PRJNA397722
Bachground & aims: We performed an integrated analysis to identify microRNAs (miRNAs) and mRNAs with altered expression in liver tumors from 3 mouse models of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and human tumor tissues. Methods: We analyzed miRNA and mRNA expression profiles of liver tissues from mice with diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis, conditional expression of lymphotoxin alpha and lymphotoxin beta , or inducible expression of a Myc transgene (Tet-O-Myc mice), as well as male C57BL/6 mice (controls). miRNA mimics were expressed and miRNAs and mRNAs were knocked down in human (Huh7, Hep3B, JHH2) hepatoma cell lines; cells were analyzed for viability, proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion. Cells were grown as xenograft tumors in nude mice and analyzed. We combined in-silico target gene prediction with mRNA profiles from all 3 mouse models. We quantified miRNA levels in 146 fresh-frozen tissues from patients (125 HCCs, 17 matched non-tumor tissues, and 4 liver samples from patients without cancer) and published human data sets and tested correlations with patient survival times using Kaplan-Meier curves and the log-rank test. Levels of NUSAP1 mRNA were quantified in 237 HCCs and 5 non-tumor liver samples using the Taqman assay. Results: Levels of the microRNA 193a-5p (MIR193A-5p) were reduced in liver tumors from all 3 mouse tumor models and in human HCC samples, compared with non-tumor liver tissues. Expression of a MIR193A-5p mimic in hepatoma cells reduced proliferation, survival, migration, and invasion and their growth as xenograft tumors in nude mice. We found nucleolar and spindle associated protein 1 (NUSAP1) to be a target of MIR193A-5p; HCC cells and tissues with low levels of MIR193A-5p had increased expression of NUSAP1. Increased levels of NUSAP1 in HCC samples correlated with shorter survival times of patients. Knockdown of NUSAP1 in Huh7 cells reduced proliferation, survival, migration, and growth as xenograft tumors in nude mice. Hydrodynamic tail-vein injections of a small hairpin RNA against NUSAP1 reduced growth of AKT1-MYC-induced tumors in mice. Conclusions: MIR193A-5p appears to prevent liver tumorigenesis by reducing levels of NUSAP1. Levels of MIR193A-5p are reduced in mouse and human HCC cells and tissues, leading to increased levels of NUSAP1, associated with shorter survival times of patients. Integrated analyses of miRNAs and mRNAs in tumors from mouse models can lead to identification of therapeutic targets in humans.
Evaluation of functional properties of current and novel protein sources using enteroids
Kar, S.K. ; Boekschoten, M.V. - \ 2018
GSE98051 - Mus musculus - PRJNA383808
This study was designed to address key questions concerning the use of alternative protein sources for animal feeds and addresses aspects such as their nutrient composition and impact on gut function. We used casein (CAS), spray dried porcine plasma (SDPP), soybean meal (SBM), and yellow meal worm (YMW) as protein sources. We have investigated the use of intestinal organoids as a model to test the effects of different protein sources on the intestinal epithelium. Mouse enteroids were exposed to different undigested protein sources (4% w/v, viz. soybean meal, SBM; casein, CAS; spray dried plasma protein, SDPP; and yellow meal worm, YMW) or DMEM as a control. Microarrays were used to detail the global gene expression.
Skeletal muscle Nr4a1 hypomethylation and gene induction reduce insulin sensitivity in sedentary maternal high-fat offspring
Schothorst, E.M. van; Schumann, Sara ; Stelt, I. van der; Dartel, D.A.M. van; Klaus, Susanne - \ 2018
Mus musculus - GSE104029 - PRJNA408062
Maternal high-fat consumption has negative effects on the offspring’s obesity/diabetes susceptibility and we hypothesize that epigenetic modifications in the skeletal muscle are partly responsible for this phenotype. To detect genes affected by maternal nutrition, offspring of low-fat (LF) and high-fat (HF) diet fed dams (C57BL/6 mice) received LF diet upon weaning and were sacrificed at an age of 6 or 25 weeks. M. quadriceps gene expression was investigated by microarray analysis revealing upregulation of the nuclear receptor Nr4a1 by maternal HF feeding. This was accompanied by promoter hypomethylation of CpG‑1408 which correlated with higher Nr4a1 gene expression at both ages. Offspring voluntary exercise training normalized Nr4a1 methylation/expression and ameliorated the negative effects of maternal HF feeding on insulin sensitivity. Overall, Nr4a1 expression correlated with higher insulin levels during oral glucose tolerance test and could, therefore, be involved in the programming offspring’s diabetes susceptibility.
Gender and strain dependent differences in intestinal immunology correlate with differences in microbiota composition
Hooiveld, G.J.E.J. - \ 2018
Mus musculus - GSE85913 - PRJNA339737
This SuperSeries is composed of the SubSeries listed.
Gender and strain dependent differences in intestinal immunology correlate with differences in microbiota composition (colon)
Elderman, Marlies ; Hugenholtz, F. ; Belzer, C. ; Boekschoten, M.V. ; Beek, A.A. van; Haan, Bart J. de; Savelkoul, H.F.J. ; Vos, Paul de; Faas, Marijke M. - \ 2018
Mus musculus - GSE85911 - PRJNA339744
A dysbiosis in the intestinal microbiome plays a role in the pathogenesis of several immunological diseases. These diseases often show a gender bias, suggesting gender differences in immune responses and in the intestinal microbiome. We hypothesized that gender differences in immune responses are associated with gender differences in microbiota. We demonstrated mouse strain dependent gender differences in the intestinal microbiome. Interestingly, a cluster of colonic genes (related to humoral and cell-mediated immune responses) correlated oppositely with microbiota species abundant in B6 females and in BALB/c males. This suggests that with different genetic backgrounds, gender associated immune responses are differentially regulated by microbiota. The net result was the same, since both mouse strains showed similar gender induced differences in immune cell populations in the mesenteric lymph nodes. Therefore, host-microbe interactions might be more complicated than assumed, as bacterial-species adaptations might be highly dependent on the genetic make-up of the individual.
Gender and strain dependent differences in intestinal immunology correlate with differences in microbiota composition (ileum)
Elderman, Marlies ; Hugenholtz, F. ; Belzer, C. ; Boekschoten, M.V. ; Beek, A.A. van; Haan, Bart J. de; Savelkoul, H.F.J. ; Vos, Paul de; Faas, Marijke M. - \ 2018
Mus musculus - GSE85912 - PRJNA339743
A dysbiosis in the intestinal microbiome plays a role in the pathogenesis of several immunological diseases. These diseases often show a gender bias, suggesting gender differences in immune responses and in the intestinal microbiome. We hypothesized that gender differences in immune responses are associated with gender differences in microbiota. We demonstrated mouse strain dependent gender differences in the intestinal microbiome. Interestingly, a cluster of colonic genes (related to humoral and cell-mediated immune responses) correlated oppositely with microbiota species abundant in B6 females and in BALB/c males. This suggests that with different genetic backgrounds, gender associated immune responses are differentially regulated by microbiota. The net result was the same, since both mouse strains showed similar gender induced differences in immune cell populations in the mesenteric lymph nodes. Therefore, host-microbe interactions might be more complicated than assumed, as bacterial-species adaptations might be highly dependent on the genetic make-up of the individual.
The whole genome effects of the PPARα agonist fenofibrate on livers of hepatocyte humanized mice
Rosa Rodriguez, M.A. de la; Sugahara, Go ; Ishida, Yuji ; Tateno, Chise ; Kersten, A.H. - \ 2018
Mus musculus - GSE107041 - PRJNA418862
The role of PPARα in gene regulation in mouse liver is well characterized. However, less is known about the effect of PPARα activation in human liver. The aim of the present study was to better characterize the impact of PPARα activation on gene regulation in human liver by combining transcriptomics with the use of hepatocyte humanized livers. To that end, chimeric mice containing hepatocyte humanized livers were given an oral dose of 300 mg/kg fenofibrate daily for 4 days. Livers were collected and analysed by hematoxilin and eosin staining, qPCR, and transcriptomics. Transcriptomics data were compared with existing datasets on fenofibrate treatment in normal mice. The human hepatocytes exhibited excessive lipid accumulation. Fenofibrate increased the size of the mouse but not human hepatocytes, and tended to reduce steatosis in the human hepatocytes. Quantitative PCR indicated that induction of PPARα targets by fenofibrate was less pronounced in the human hepatocytes than in the residual mouse hepatocytes. Transcriptomics analysis indicated that, after filtering, a total of 282 genes was significantly different between fenofibrate- and control-treated mice (P<0.01). 123 genes were significantly lower and 159 genes significantly higher in the fenofibrate-treated mice, including many established PPARα targets such as FABP1, HADHB, HADHA, VNN1, PLIN2, ACADVL and HMGCS2. According to gene set enrichment analysis, fenofibrate upregulated interferon/cytokine signaling-related pathways in hepatocyte humanized liver, but downregulated these pathways in normal mouse liver. Also, fenofibrate downregulated pathways related to DNA synthesis in hepatocyte humanized liver but not in normal mouse liver. The results support the major role of PPARα in regulating hepatic lipid metabolism, and underscore the more modest effect of PPARα activation on gene regulation in human liver compared to mouse liver. The data suggest that PPARα may have a suppressive effect on DNA synthesis in human liver, and a stimulatory effect on interferon/cytokine signalling.
The Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α is dispensable for cold-induced adipose tissue browning in mice
Defour, M. ; Dijk, W. ; Ruppert, P.M.M. ; Nascimento, Emmani B.M. ; Schrauwen, Patrick ; Kersten, A.H. - \ 2018
Mus musculus - GSE110420 - PRJNA433669
Chronic cold exposure causes white adipose tissue (WAT) to adopt features of brown adipose tissue, a process known as browning. Previous studies have hinted at a possible role for the transcription factor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor alpha (PPARα) in cold-induced browning. Here we aimed to investigate the importance of PPARα in driving transcriptional changes during cold-induced browning in mice. Male wildtype and PPARα−/− mice were housed at thermoneutrality (28 °C) or cold (5 °C) for 10 days. Whole genome expression analysis was performed on inguinal WAT. In addition, other analyses were carried out. Whole genome expression data of livers of wildtype and PPARα−/− mice fasted for 24 h served as positive control for PPARα-dependent gene regulation.Cold exposure increased food intake and decreased weight of BAT and WAT to a similar extent in wildtype and PPARα−/− mice. Except for plasma non-esterified fatty acids, none of the cold-induced changes in plasma metabolites were dependent on PPARα genotype. Histological analysis of inguinal WAT showed clear browning upon cold exposure but did not reveal any morphological differences between wildtype and PPARα−/− mice. Transcriptomics analysis of inguinal WAT showed a marked effect of cold on overall gene expression, as revealed by principle component analysis and hierarchical clustering. However, wildtype and PPARα−/− mice clustered together, even after cold exposure, indicating a similar overall gene expression profile in the two genotypes. Pathway analysis revealed that cold upregulated pathways involved in energy usage, oxidative phosphorylation, and fatty acid β-oxidation to a similar extent in wildtype and PPARα−/− mice. Furthermore, cold-mediated induction of genes related to thermogenesis such as Ucp1, Elovl3, Cox7a1, Cox8, and Cidea, as well as many PPAR target genes, was similar in wildtype and PPARα−/− mice. Finally, pharmacological PPARα activation had a minimal effect on expression of cold-induced genes in murine WAT.Cold-induced changes in gene expression in inguinal WAT are unaltered in mice lacking PPARα, indicating that PPARα is dispensable for cold-induced browning.
Lifelong calorie restriction and markers of colonic health in aging mice
Kok, D.E.G. ; Rusli, F. ; Lugt, B.M. van der; Lute, C. ; Laghi, Luca ; Salvioli, Stefano ; Picone, Gianfranco ; Franceschi, Claudio ; Smidt, H. ; Vervoort, J.J.M. ; Kampman, E. ; Müller, Michael ; Steegenga, W.T. - \ 2018
Mus musculus - GSE100701 - PRJNA392687
Diminishment of colonic health is associated with various age-related pathologies. Calorie restriction (CR) is an efficient strategy to increase healthy lifespan, although underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Here we report the effects of lifelong CR on markers of colonic health in aging mice. We show that 30% energy reduction, as compared to a control (C) and moderate-fat (MF) diet, is associated with attenuated immune-related gene expression and lower levels of bile acids in the colon. Pronounced shifts in microbiota composition, together with lowered plasma levels of interleukin 6, in mice exposed to CR are in line with these findings. Furthermore, expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism was higher upon CR as compared to C and MF, pointing towards efficient regulation of energy metabolism. Switching from CR to an ad libitum MF diet at old age revealed remarkable phenotypic plasticity, although expression of a small subset of genes remained CR-associated. This research demonstrates that CR beneficially affects markers of colonic health in aging mice and as such may attenuate the progressive age-related decline in health.
β2→1-fructans modulate the immune system in vivo in a microbiota-dependent and -independent fashion
Fransen, Floris ; Sahasrabudhe, Neha M. ; Elderman, Marlies ; Bosveld, M. ; Aidy, Sahar El; Hugenholtz, F. ; Borghuis, Theo ; Kousemaker, Ben ; Winkel, Simon ; Gaast-de Jongh, Christa van der; Jonge, Marien I. de; Boekschoten, M.V. ; Smidt, H. ; Vos, Paul de - \ 2018
Mus musculus - GSE94516 - PRJNA371228
It has been shown in vitro that only specific dietary-fibers contribute to immunity but studies in vivo are not conclusive. Here we investigated degree of polymerization (DP) dependent effects of β2→1-fructans on immunity via microbiota-dependent and -independent effects. To this end, conventional or germ-free mice received short- or long-chain β2→1-fructan for 5 days. Immune cell populations in the spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), and Peyer's patches (PPs) were analyzed with flow cytometry, genome-wide gene expression in the ileum was measured with microarray, and gut microbiota composition was analyzed with 16S rRNA sequencing of fecal samples. We found that β2→1-fructans modulated immunity by both microbiota and microbiota-independent effects. Moreover, effects were dependent on the chain-length of the β2→1-fructans type polymer. Both short- and long-chain β2→1-fructans enhanced T-helper 1 cells in Peyer's patches, whereas only short-chain β2→1-fructans increased regulatory T cells and CD11b-CD103- DCs in the MLN. A common feature after short- and long-chain β2→1-fructan treatment was enhanced Fut2 expression and other IL-22-dependent genes in the ileum of conventional mice. These effects were not associated with shifts in gut microbiota composition, or altered production of short-chain fatty acids. Both short- and long-chain β2→1-fructans also induced immune effects in germ-free animals, demonstrating direct effect independent from the gut microbiota. Also, these effects were dependent on the chain-length of the β2→1-fructans. Short-chain β2→1-fructan induced lower CD80 expression by CD11b-CD103- DCs in PPs, whereas long-chain β2→1-fructan specifically modulated B cell responses in germ-free mice. In conclusion, support of immunity is determined by the chemical structure of β2→1-fructans and is partially microbiota-independent.
Aged gut microbiota contributes to systemical inflammaging after transfer to germ-free mice
Fransen, Floris ; Beek, A.A. van; Borghuis, Theo ; Aidy, Sahar El; Hugenholtz, F. ; Gaast-de Jongh, Christa van der; Savelkoul, H.F.J. ; Jonge, Marien I. De; Boekschoten, M.V. ; Smidt, H. ; Faas, Marijke M. ; Vos, Paul de - \ 2018
Mus musculus - GSE104063 - PRJNA408136
Advanced age is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation, which is usually referred to as inflammaging. Elderly are also known to have an altered gut microbiota composition. However, whether inflammaging is a cause or consequence of an altered gut microbiota composition is not clear. In this study gut microbiota from young or old conventional mice was transferred to young germ-free mice. Four weeks after gut microbiota transfer immune cell populations in spleen, Peyer’s patches, and mesenteric lymph nodes from conventionalized germ-free mice were analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, whole-genome gene expression in the ileum was analyzed by microarray. Gut microbiota composition of donor and recipient mice was analyzed with 16S rDNA sequencing. Here we show by transferring aged microbiota to young germ-free mice that certain bacterial species within the aged microbiota promote inflammaging. This effect was associated with lower levels of Akkermansia and higher levels of TM7 bacteria and Proteobacteria in the aged microbiota after transfer. The aged microbiota promoted inflammation in the small intestine in the germ-free mice and enhanced leakage of inflammatory bacterial components into the circulation was observed. Moreover, the aged microbiota promoted increased T cell activation in the systemic compartment. In conclusion, these data indicate that the gut microbiota from old mice contributes to inflammaging after transfer to young germ-free mice.
Plasticity of lifelong calorie-restricted C57BL/6J mice in adapting to a medium-fat diet intervention at old age
Rusli, F. ; Boekschoten, M.V. ; Borelli, Vincenzo ; Sun, Chen ; Lute, C. ; Menke, Aswin L. ; Heuvel, Joost van den; Salvioli, Stefano ; Franceschi, Claudio ; Müller, Michael ; Steegenga, W.T. - \ 2018
Mus musculus - GSE102593 - PRJNA398117
Specific metabolic activation of adipose tissue macrophages during obesity promotes inflammatory responses
Boutens, L. ; Hooiveld, G.J.E.J. ; Stienstra, R. - \ 2018
Mus musculus - GSE84000 - PRJNA327794
Recent studies have identified intracellular metabolism as a fundamental determinant of macrophage function. In obesity, proinflammatory macrophages accumulate in adipose tissue and trigger chronic low-grade inflammation, that promotes the development of systemic insulin resistance, yet changes in their intracellular energy metabolism are currently unknown. We therefore set out to study metabolic signatures of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) in lean and obese conditions. F4/80-positive ATMs were isolated from obese vs lean mice. High-fat feeding of wild-type mice and myeloid-specific Hif1α-/- mice was used to examine the role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in ATMs part of obese adipose tissue. In vitro, bone marrow-derived macrophages were co-cultured with adipose tissue explants to examine adipose tissue-induced changes in macrophage phenotypes. Transcriptome analysis, real-time flux measurements, ELISA and several other approaches were used to determine the metabolic signatures and inflammatory status of macrophages. In addition, various metabolic routes were inhibited to determine their relevance for cytokine production. Transcriptome analysis and extracellular flux measurements of mouse ATMs revealed unique metabolic rewiring in obesity characterised by both increased glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation. Similar metabolic activation of CD14+ cells in obese individuals was associated with diabetes outcome. These changes were not observed in peritoneal macrophages from obese vs lean mice and did not resemble metabolic rewiring in M1-primed macrophages. Instead, metabolic activation of macrophages was dose-dependently induced by a set of adipose tissue-derived factors that could not be reduced to leptin or lactate. Using metabolic inhibitors, we identified various metabolic routes, including fatty acid oxidation, glycolysis and glutaminolysis, that contributed to cytokine release by ATMs in lean adipose tissue. Glycolysis appeared to be the main contributor to the proinflammatory trait of macrophages in obese adipose tissue. HIF-1α, a key regulator of glycolysis, nonetheless appeared to play no critical role in proinflammatory activation of ATMs during early stages of obesity. Our results reveal unique metabolic activation of ATMs in obesity that promotes inflammatory cytokine release. Further understanding of metabolic programming in ATMs will most likely lead to novel therapeutic targets to curtail inflammatory responses in obesity.
Structural, functional and molecular analysis of the effects of aging in the small intestine and colon of C57BL/6J mice
Hooiveld, G.J.E.J. - \ 2017
GSE39975 - Mus musculus - PRJNA172185
This SuperSeries is composed of the SubSeries listed below.
Check title to add to marked list
<< previous | next >>

Show 20 50 100 records per page

 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.