Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    We will mail you new results for this query: keywords==animal behaviour
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Gezond drinkwater voor vleeskuikens
Ellen, H.H. - \ 2018
Wageningen : Wageningen Livestock Research - 2 p.
animal welfare - animal production - poultry - broilers - animal behaviour - animal health - drinking water - animal nutrition
Verbetering brandveiligheid oudere veestallen
Bokma-Bakker, M.H. - \ 2018
Wageningen : Wageningen UR Livestock Research - 2 p.
animal welfare - animal production - poultry - broilers - animal behaviour - animal health - animal housing - animal nutrition
Broiler welfare under scrutiny
Jong, I.C. de - \ 2018
Wageningen : Wageningen Livestock Research - 2 p.
animal welfare - animal production - poultry - broilers - animal behaviour - animal health - animal housing - animal nutrition
Intraspecific variation in herbivore-induced plant volatiles influences the spatial range of plant–parasitoid interactions
Aartsma, Yavanna ; Leroy, Benjamin ; Werf, Wopke van der; Dicke, Marcel ; Poelman, Erik H. ; Bianchi, Felix J.J.A. - \ 2018
Oikos (2018). - ISSN 0030-1299 - 10 p.
animal behaviour - insect–plant interactions - plant odours - spatial ecology

Chemical information influences the behaviour of many animals, thus affecting species interactions. Many animals forage for resources that are heterogeneously distributed in space and time, and have evolved foraging behaviour that utilizes information related to these resources. Herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs), emitted by plants upon herbivore attack, provide information on herbivory to various animal species, including parasitoids. Little is known about the spatial scale at which plants attract parasitoids via HIPVs under field conditions and how intraspecific variation in HIPV emission affects this spatial scale. Here, we investigated the spatial scale of parasitoid attraction to two cabbage accessions that differ in relative preference of the parasitoid Cotesia glomerata when plants were damaged by Pieris brassicae caterpillars. Parasitoids were released in a field experiment with plants at distances of up to 60 m from the release site using intervals between plants of 10 or 20 m to assess parasitism rates over time and distance. Additionally, we observed host-location behaviour of parasitoids in detail in a semi-field tent experiment with plant spacing up to 8 m. Plant accession strongly affected successful host location in field set-ups with 10 or 20 m intervals between plants. In the semi-field set-up, plant finding success by parasitoids decreased with increasing plant spacing, differed between plant accessions, and was higher for host-infested plants than for uninfested plants. We demonstrate that parasitoids can be attracted to herbivore-infested plants over large distances (10 m or 20 m) in the field, and that stronger plant attractiveness via HIPVs increases this distance (up to at least 20 m). Our study indicates that variation in plant traits can affect attraction distance, movement patterns of parasitoids, and ultimately spatial patterns of plant–insect interactions. It is therefore important to consider plant-trait variation in HIPVs when studying animal foraging behaviour and multi-trophic interactions in a spatial context.

Rust en regelmaat lonen voor de koe
Dixhoorn, Ingrid van - \ 2018
animal welfare - animal production - poultry - animal behaviour - animal housing - animal health
Tackling cage-free layer housing air quality challenges
Winkel, Albert - \ 2018
animal welfare - animal production - poultry - animal behaviour - animal housing - animal health
Boars with balls
Backus, Ge - \ 2018
animal welfare - animal production - pigs - animal behaviour - animal ethics - animal health - castration
Kattenkwaad: in huis poeslief, buiten een moordmachine
Debrot, Dolfi - \ 2018
animal welfare - pets - cats - animal behaviour
Three stars for animal welfare
Bos, Bram - \ 2017
animal welfare - animal production - poultry - fowls - animal housing - animal behaviour - animal health
Reduced calf mortality when the calf’s needs are leading : Pledge for a renewed view on calf rearing
Ferwerda-van Zonneveld, R.T. ; Bos, A.P. ; Plomp, M. ; Gaag, M.A. van der; Antonis, A.F.G. - \ 2017
Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research - 15 p.
animal welfare - animal production - dairy cattle - calves - animal health - animal nutrition - animal housing - animal behaviour - elasticity
Is de ‘nieuwe’ supermarktkip gelukkiger dan de omstreden ‘plofkip’?
Jong, I.C. de - \ 2017
Wageningen : Livestock Stories blog, Wageningen University & Research
animal welfare - animal production - poultry - broilers - animal behaviour - animal health - animal housing
De dilemma’s van niet-gecoupeerde staarten
Duteweerd, Theo - \ 2017
Wageningen : Livestock Stories blog, Wageningen University & Research
animal welfare - animal production - pigs - animal health - animal behaviour - legislation - policy
Ontstaan ‘haanburger’ is vergelijkbaar met kalfsvlees
Heeres-van der Tol, J.J. - \ 2017
Wageningen : Livestock Stories blog, Wageningen University & Research
animal welfare - animal production - dairy cattle - veal calves - animal housing - animal behaviour - animal health - animal nutrition
Van kalf tot koe, maar hoe? Wat komt daar allemaal bij kijken?
Heeres-van der Tol, J.J. - \ 2017
Wageningen : Livestock Stories blog, Wageningen University & Research
animal welfare - animal production - dairy cattle - veal calves - animal housing - animal behaviour - animal health - animal nutrition
Code of Practice for the Care and Handling of Rabbits: Review of Scientific Research on Priority Issues
Turner, Patricia ; Buijs, Stephanie ; Rommers, J.M. ; Tessier, Maxime - \ 2017
National Farm Animal Care Council - 69 p.
animal welfare - animal production - rabbits - animal housing - animal nutrition - animal health - animal behaviour
It is widely accepted that animal welfare codes, guidelines, standards or legislation should take advantage of the best available knowledge. This knowledge is often generated from the scientific literature. In re-establishing a Code of Practice development process, NFACC recognized the need for a more formal means of integrating scientific input into the Code of Practice process. A Scientific Committee review of priority animal welfare issues for the species being addressed will provide valuable information to the Code Development Committee in developing or revising a Code of Practice. As the Scientific Committee report is publicly available, the transparency and credibility of the Code is enhanced. For each Code of Practice being developed or revised, NFACC will identify a Scientific Committee. This committee will consist of a target number of 6 scientists familiar with research on the care and management of the animals under consideration. NFACC will request nominations from 1) Canadian Veterinary Medical Association, 2) Canadian Society of Animal Science, and 3) Canadian Chapter of the International Society for Applied Ethology. At least one representative from each of these professional scientific bodies will be named to the Scientific Committee. Other professional scientific organizations as appropriate may also serve on the Scientific Committee. Purpose & Goals The Scientific Committee will develop a report synthesizing the results of research relating to key animal welfare issues, as identified by the Scientific Committee and the Code Development Committee. The report will be used by the Code Development Committee in drafting a Code of Practice for the species in question. The Scientific Committee report will not contain recommendations following from any research results. Its purpose is to present a compilation of the scientific findings without bias. The full Terms of Reference for the Scientific Committee can be found within the NFACC Development Process for Codes of Practice for the Care and Handling of Farm Animals, available at www.nfacc.ca/code-development-process#appendixc.
Project Insecten in pluimvee
Ruis, Markus - \ 2017
animal welfare - poultry - animal nutrition - animal behaviour - animal production
Stressvrij omgaan met varkens
Ruis, Markus - \ 2017
animal welfare - animal production - pigs - animal behaviour - animal health - housing - animal housing
Metabolic status, lactation persistency, and udder health of dairy cows after different dry period lengths
Hoeij, Renny van - \ 2017
University. Promotor(en): Bas Kemp; T.J.G.M. Lam, co-promotor(en): Ariette van Knegsel; Jan Dijkstra. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789463438070 - 285
dairy cattle - animal health - animal behaviour - dry period - metabolism - energy balance - lactation - milk production - udders - cattle feeding - melkvee - diergezondheid - diergedrag - gustperiode - metabolisme - energiebalans - lactatie - melkproductie - uiers - rundveevoeding

Cows traditionally have a 6 to 8 week non-lactating –‘dry period’- before calving and the start of the next lactation in order to maximize milk production in the subsequent lactation. An omitted, compared with a shortened, dry period reduces milk yield and improves energy availability in cows postpartum, but effects on udder health and persistency were unclear. Cows without a dry period fattened and spontaneously dried off due to the improved energy availability. Reducing the energy availability in the feed for cows without a dry period did not affect fattening or lactation persistency in late lactation. Cows with a short or without a dry period did not receive dry cow antibiotics in this study and this did not affect udder health across the dry period or in early lactation, but seemed to impair udder health in late lactation for cows without a dry period.

Light during incubation and noise around hatching aect cognitive bias in laying hens
Rodenburg, T.B. ; Scholten, N.J.T. ; Haas, E.N. de - \ 2017
In: Proceedings of the 51st Congress of the International Society for Applied Ethology (ISAE), 7-10 August 2017, Aarhus, Denmark. - Wageningen : Wageningen Academic Publishers - ISBN 9789086863112 - p. 165 - 165.
animal welfare - animal behaviour
Incubation and hatching conditions can inuence development of laying hens. In commercialconditions, chicks are incubated in the dark and hatch in a noisy environment. €is may a�ecttheir behavioural and cognitive development in a negative way and may have lasting e�ectson their assessment of ambiguous stimuli in a cognitive bias test. €e aim of this study was toinvestigate the e�ects of light during incubation and noise around hatching on cognitive biasin adult laying hens. To meet that aim, eggs were incubated and hatched according to fourdi�erent treatments in a 2×2 cross design: during the .rst 16 days of incubation, they wouldeither be incubated in the dark or in a 12L:12D light schedule. From 17 to 21 days of age, half ofthe eggs from each light treatment would either be incubated in a noisy environment (playbackcommercial incubator noise; 90 dB) or a quiet environment (60-70 dB). Birds were kept ingroups of maximum 10 birds in oor pens separated per treatment from 0 to 35 weeks of age(seven groups per treatment). At 35 weeks of age, 32 hens (eight per treatment) were trainedfor a cognitive bias test, where they had to learn that one side of the test arena was rewarded(mixed grains and mealworms) and the other side was not (smell of feed only). €e rewardedside was varied according to a balanced design. €e experimenter was blind to birds’ treatments.When a bird had learned the task, she was tested with ambiguous cues, where the feeder wouldbe placed in the centre (50%), nearer the unrewarded side (25%) or nearer the rewarded side(75%). €is was done by subjecting each hen to 12 trials, where two rewarded (R) trials andone unrewarded (U) trial (order RRU or RUR, balanced design) were followed by one of theambiguous trials. For all hens, the .rst ambiguous trial was the 50% trial, followed by the 25%trial and the 75% trial. Latency to approach the feeder was analysed using a mixed model withtreatment, trial order and type of cue as .xed factors (including all interactions) and pen nestedwithin treatment as random factor. Over all treatments, birds had a shorter latency to reach thefeeder with the rewarded cue compared to all other cues, and with the 50% and 75% comparedto the unrewarded and 25% cue as expected (F4,360=211.4; P<0.001). €ere was a signi.cantinteraction between treatment and type of cue (F12,360=2.11; P<0.05). Birds from the lightand noise treatment were slower than birds from the other groups in the ambiguous 50% trial(F1,360=3.49; P<0.05), which is interpreted as a more pessimistic response to the ambiguouscue. €e light treatment during incubation may have resulted in a faster embryo development.€is may in turn have resulted in chicks that were more sensitive to the noise treatment thatwas applied around hatching. In conclusion, incubation and hatching conditions in layinghens can a�ect cognitive bias in laying hens. Creating more quiet incubators and could havepositive e�ects on laying hen welfare.
Alternatieve vloeren voor vleeskalveren
Heeres-van der Tol, Jetta ; Wolthuis, Maaike ; Bokma, Sjoerd ; Smits, Dolf ; Stockhofe, Norbert ; Vermeij, Izak ; Reenen, Kees van - \ 2017
Wageningen : Wageningen Livestock Research (Wageningen Livestock Research rapport 1056) - 103
dierenwelzijn - dierlijke productie - vleeskalveren - huisvesting - diergedrag - diergezondheid - animal welfare - animal production - veal calves - housing - animal behaviour - animal health
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