Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Pionieren : De impact van innovatieve maatschappelijke initiatieven op een natuur-inclusieve samenleving
Salverda, I.E. ; Dam, R.I. van; Pleijte, M. - \ 2017
Wageningen : Wageningen Environmental Research (Pionieren ) - 64 p.
natuur - samenleving - participatie - stedelijke gebieden - sport - lopen - burgers - fondsgelden - weidevogels - bodem - nederland - nature - society - participation - urban areas - walking - citizens - funding - grassland birds - soil - netherlands
De effecten van gereduceerde grondbewerking : groenbemesters beschermen bodem in winter en verminderen onkruiddruk in groeiseizoen
Balen, D.J.M. van; Leeuwen-Haagsma, W.K. van - \ 2017
Ekoland 37 (2017)5. - ISSN 0926-9142 - p. 12 - 13.
groenbemesters - biologische landbouw - bodemkwaliteit - bodem - bodembiologie - organische stof - gereduceerde grondbewerking - green manures - organic farming - soil quality - soil - soil biology - organic matter - reduced tillage
Binnen de biologische landbouw was er altijd extra aandacht voor bodemkwaliteit. De bodem voedt de plant tenslotte. Intussen beginnen wat meer te leren over welke processen er zich in de bodem afspelen. En over de rol die planten spelen. Naast gewas- en rassenkeuze kunnen groenbemesters en mengsels van gewassen en groenbemesters een belangrijke rol spelen. Zo kan ook de plant de bodem voeden.
Biotic interactions and trait-based ecosystem functioning in soil
Sechi, Valentina - \ 2017
University. Promotor(en): Lijbert Brussaard, co-promotor(en): Ron de Goede; C. Mulder; M. Rutgers. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789463431316 - 176
soil - ecosystems - plant-animal interactions - interactions - soil biology - soil quality - grasslands - collembola - diversity - bodem - ecosystemen - plant-dier interacties - interacties - bodembiologie - bodemkwaliteit - graslanden - diversiteit

Recent emphasis on ecosystem services as a framework to evaluate ecosystems and to promote their sustainable use has drawn attention to how organisms contribute to the delivery of services. Soil attributes and biotic interactions play important roles in ecological processes (e.g. soil formation, nutrient turnover, carbon sequestration and transformation) and, consequently, in the related delivery of ecosystem services.

Therefore, understanding how soil organisms interact and how they respond to environmental conditions is fundamental to preserve soil functioning and provide a meaningful assessment of ecosystem services. Functional traits determine individual responses to pressures and their effects on ecosystem functioning hence, investigating soil ecosystems from a trait-based perspective offers an interesting opportunity to link the functional responses of the organisms to environmental pressures and to give insight into how the entire community influences ecological processes.

The main objective of this thesis is to develop and to test concepts for a trait-driven quantification of ecosystem services through the assessment of the effects of land management on soil processes. In particular, it focuses on exploring the potential of a trait-based approach in identifying and better understanding the response of the soil biota to environmental pressures and analyses the responses of soil organisms in terms of changes in functional trait distribution and trophic interactions.

This work shows that approaches taking the whole soil community into consideration are more suitable to give insight into the effect of anthropogenic pressure on ecosystem functioning than approaches based on single taxonomic groups. Moreover, performing combined analysis (e.g. analysing body-mass distribution and trophic grouping) helps to better identify community response to environmental pressure.

A clear methodology for the next step, i.e. quantification of ecosystem services, is still lacking due to the current difficulties to link and quantify the effect of anthropogenic pressure to ecosystem functioning in soil. For this reason, it is essential that methods analysed in this thesis will be further explored under different environmental pressures to enable the development of tools to be used at the interface of science and society for sustainable development.

The steering role of plant-soil interactions in natural community dynamics and nature restoration
Wubs, Engel Reinder Jasper - \ 2017
University. Promotor(en): Wim van der Putten; T.M. Bezemer. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789463434447 - 242
soil plant relationships - soil - plants - ecological restoration - terrestrial ecosystems - soil inoculation - plant communities - soil ecology - bodem-plant relaties - bodem - planten - ecologisch herstel - terrestrische ecosystemen - bodeminoculatie - plantengemeenschappen - bodemecologie

Biodiversity is declining worldwide and many ecosystems have been degraded due to human actions. There have been many attempts to restore degraded ecosystems, but restoration success varies. Past human management has left important abiotic and biotic legacies and active intervention is needed to overcome these legacies. Legacy effects include altered abiotic conditions and limited availability of appropriate seeds. However, plants also have many interactions with the myriad organisms that inhabit the soil. Soil biota include e.g. bacteria, fungi, nematodes, collembolan, and mites. Restoring plant-soil interactions may be key to successful ecological restoration, because studies on natural succession in ecosystems show that both plant and soil communities develop in concert. In addition, late-successional soil communities promote the performance of late-succession plant species that are often the target species for restoration. The aims of my thesis were to 1) test whether inoculation of living soil can improve restoration of species-rich grasslands and dry heathlands, and 2) understand how plant-soil interactions affect plant composition and diversity.

In a large-scale field experiment, called “Reijerscamp-experiment”, I tested the potential of soil inoculation to speed up ecosystem restoration. On a former arable field large areas of on average 0.5 ha were inoculated with a thin layer of <1 cm living soil, which was taken either from a mid-succession grassland or a dry-heathland. After six years I monitored the species composition of the vegetation and the soil community. I found that both types of inoculum had substantially altered the community composition of both soil and vegetation. Moreover, the soil inocula had caused a shift in the direction of the respective donor communities. In a parallel mesocosm experiment I repeated the experiment while sowing a standardized species-rich seed mixture to ensure that seed availability was the same in all treatments. Also in this case the sown plant community developed towards the respective communities found in the donor sites. Consequently the soil community is, at least in part, able to steer plant community composition in the field.

I also tested how mixtures of inocula from different donor systems affect restoration success. In a greenhouse experiment I made replacement series of soil inocula sourced from arable fields, mid-succession grasslands and dry heathlands and monitored the responses of target and ruderal plant species. The target species all responded positively to higher proportions of heathland material in the inoculum, while the responses of the ruderal species were variable. Interestingly, a 50:50 mixture of arable and heathland inoculum strongly reduced the growth of the ruderal species. Soil inoculation may be considered as a way of microbiome engineering, which is a newly emerging field mainly used to improve human health and agricultural production. My results show that conceptually similar techniques can be applied to improve inocula for the restoration of ecological communities.

In a second field experiment I tested the long-term consequences of soil inoculation with and without sowing mid-successional plant species for plant and soil community composition. I found that sowing strongly altered plant community composition for over two decades. Soil inoculation, on the other hand, substantially altered the composition of the soil nematode community and that these effects persisted for at least 15 years. However, in contrast to the Reijerscamp experiment, the effect of soil inoculation on vegetation composition was transient. I propose that in this case the presence of an intact arable top soil, as well as perhaps a too minimal difference between the composition of the donor and recipient soil communities may have limited the impact of the soil inocula.

In general, the restoration of plant cover and a number of common (‘matrix’) plant species can be achieved using standard approaches, e.g. reducing site fertility and providing seed material, but creating conditions that allow for coexistence of both locally dominant and rare subordinate species proves much more elusive. Fundamental knowledge on how biodiversity is regulated is needed to restore diverse plant communities including the rare species. Testing plant-soil feedback provides a way to directly study the net consequences of the myriad interactions between plants and soil biota for plant performance and community composition. However, while both plants and soil communities are strongly heterogeneous in space and time, spatiotemporally explicit tests of plant-soil feedback are rare.

In a greenhouse experiment I studied how spatial heterogeneity in plant-soil feedbacks influence plant communities. I found that when multiple species conditioned the soil, plant performance was reduced compared to mono-specific soil conditioning. This reduction in competitive ability led to a higher plant diversity in the experimental communities. The plant responses were not related to differences in abiotic conditions, but soil conditioning induced clear changes in fungal community composition. Recent meta-analyses and experiments have shown that spatial heterogeneity in abiotic conditions only promotes plant diversity when the grain of the heterogeneity is larger than the size of individual plants. When it is smaller, heterogeneity simply selects for those species that have the highest root plasticity and this leads to lower plant diversity. Together, these results suggest that spatial heterogeneity in abiotic conditions only promotes plant beta diversity, while interaction with the soil community, primarily soil-borne antagonists, maintains plant alpha diversity.

Finally, I used repeated soil conditioning by conspecific and heterospecific species to show that soil feedbacks may carry over across soil conditioning periods. In contrast to what is commonly assumed my data show that heterospecific soil-conditioning can result in equally negative PSF as repeated conspecific soil-conditioning and repeated conspecific soil-conditioning does not always lead to stronger negative feedback. Instead, the particular sequence of plant species that successively condition the soil strongly determines the sign and magnitude of PSF. These results highlight the need to incorporate sequential soil-conditioning in models of plant communities and effective crop-rotations.

In conclusion, plant-soil interactions are a key aspect in the natural dynamics of plant communities and can be used to improve restoration of semi-natural ecosystems. Abiotic conditions and dispersal ability determine which species may occur in a given site. However, at small spatial scales plant-soil feedbacks and particularly interactions with soil borne antagonists can enhance plant species diversity. Manipulation of the soil community, through inoculation of soil from well-developed donor sites can speed up natural succession and even steer its direction in the field. However, soil inoculation success will not be universal and depends on the match in abiotic conditions of donor and recipient sites, as well as the community composition of the inoculum and the resident communities. Future studies are needed to test the success of introducing soil communities across environmental gradients.

Technical documentation of the soil model VSD+ : Status A
Mol-Dijkstra, J.P. ; Reinds, G.J. - \ 2017
Wageningen : Statutory Research Tasks Unit for Nature & the Environment (WOt-technical report 88) - 88
soil - soil acidity - models - nutrient availability - soil carbon sequestration - climatic change - precipitation - bodem - bodemaciditeit - modellen - voedingsstoffenbeschikbaarheid - koolstofvastlegging in de bodem - klimaatverandering - neerslag
VSD+ is een model om de gevolgen te berekenen van atmosferische depositie en klimaatverandering voorbodemverzuring, de beschikbaarheid van voedingsstoffen en het vastleggen van koolstof. Het model isontwikkeld ter onderbouwing van strategieën om de uitstoot van zwavel (S) en stikstof (N) in Europa teverminderen. Dit document biedt een samenvatting van de theorie waar het model op gestoeld is, detechnische documentatie hiervan alsmede een beschrijving van het testen, het valideren en de sensitiviteitsanalysevan het model. De processen zoals beschreven in het artikel over VSD+ zijn met goed gevolg getest.De gevoeligheidsanalyse gaf aan dat de constante voor het evenwicht tussen H+ en Al3+ in de bodemoplossingen de Ca-verweringssnelheid de parameters zijn, die voor een groot gedeelte de waarde van degesimuleerde pH bepalen. Voor basenverzadiging zijn de belangrijkste parameters de uitwisselingsconstantetussen H+ en basische kationen en de verwering van Ca. Voor de C/N ratio van bodemorganische stof zijn Cen N in het strooisel en de opname van N zeer bepalende factoren. De nitraatconcentratie hangt sterk samenmet het nerslagoverschot en de netto input van N---VSD+ is a model to calculate effects of atmospheric deposition and climate change on soil acidification,nutrient availability and carbon sequestration. The model has been developed to support emission abatementstrategies of sulphur (S) and nitrogen (N) in Europe. This document contains a summary of the modeltheory, technical documentation and descriptions of testing, validations and the sensitivity analysis of themodel. The processes described in the paper about VSD+ have been tested successfully. The sensitivityanalysis showed that the constant for the equilibrium between H+ and Al3+ in the soil solution and theweathering rate of Ca are the parameters that to a large extent determine the value of the simulated pH. Forbase saturation, most important parameters are the exchange constant between H+ and base cations andthe weathering of Ca. For the C/N ratio of soil organic matter, litterfall of C and N and the uptake of N areimportant influencing factors. The nitrate concentration strongly depends on the leaching flux and the net N input
Bodemhydrofysische gegevens in BRO en BIS : update 2016
Bakker, G. ; Heinen, M. ; Wesseling, J.G. ; Groot, W.J.M. de; Assinck, F.B.T. ; Hummelink, E.W.J. - \ 2017
Wageningen : Wageningen Environmental Research (Wageningen Environmental Research rapport 2789) - 77
bodemfysica - hydrologie - water - bodem - soil physics - hydrology - soil
Lift up of Lowlands : beneficial use of dredged sediments to reverse land subsidence
Figueiredo Oliveira, Bruna Raquel - \ 2017
University. Promotor(en): Huub Rijnaarts, co-promotor(en): Tim Grotenhuis. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789462578838 - 229
dredgings - dredging - sedimentation - soil - sediment - subsidence - recycling - environmental engineering - bagger - baggeren - sedimentatie - bodem - bodemdaling - milieutechniek

In this thesis, the beneficial use of dredged sediments to reverse land subsidence in lowlands and delta areas is explored. The major constraints for beneficial use of sediments are the contaminant concentrations, and the proper managing of supply and demand of sediments (Chapter 1).

When sediments are transferred from waterways to upland conditions, a series of processes take place that transform the waterlogged sediments into aerated soils, a process known as ripening. To understand the relation between the sediments and the soils formed, physical/chemical and biological processes were studied at three scales: laboratory scale, mesoscale, and field scale. The knowledge obtained with these experiments can provide guidelines to effectively use dredged sediments to reverse land subsidence.

In the laboratory experiments, the environmental conditions were controlled, leading to constant water content and optimal oxygen concentration for biological processes. In the mesoscale experiment, the environmental parameters such as wind, precipitation and temperature, were not controlled as the 1 m3 containers used for these experiments were placed outside, in open air conditions. Still, the water level could be monitored and controlled, and the subsidence of the dredged sediment could be monitored. In the field experiment, the environmental and filling conditions could not be controlled but the changes occurring in the deposit were monitored.

In the first laboratory experiment (Chapter 2) the behaviour of dredged sediments with varying particle size distribution and organic matter content was studied. The dredged sediments were dewatered using suction chambers and then submitted to biochemical ripening during 141 days. The five types of dredged sediments had similar overall behaviour. The most significant observation was that most volume lost during dewatering and biochemical ripening was due to shrinkage and not to organic matter mineralization. Furthermore, the type of organic matter changed in the direction of humification, i.e., more stable compounds were formed. The soils formed from biochemical ripening of dredged sediments had very stable aggregates and the load-bearing capacity was enough to sustain cattle and tractors.

The second laboratory experiment (Chapter 3) was designed to investigate the influence of mixing compost and the solid fraction of swine manure (low in nutrients) with dredged sediments on dewatering and biochemical ripening. When the supply of dredged sediments is too low to compensate for land subsidence, bio-wastes, such as compost and manure, can be mixed with the sediments to reverse land subsidence. The results of this experiment confirm that most volume lost during ripening was due to shrinkage and not due to organic matter mineralization. Adding compost or the solid fraction of manure to the dredged sediments enhances the changes in the type of organic matter and CO2 production, i.e., the addition results in increased rates of organic matter mineralization which is described in the literature as the priming effect. In addition, the undrained shear strength of the mixtures of sediments with compost or manure was three times higher than the measured values for the sediments alone, meaning that organic amendments will improve the characteristics of the soil formed from ripening of sediments.

The mesoscale experiment (Chapter 4) was performed during 400 days in 1m3 containers which allowed to control the water level. Two scenarios were tested: upland deposits in which the sediments are allowed to dry; and underwater deposits in which the water level is always 2 cm above the sediments. It was expected that the upland deposit conditions would lead to a higher subsidence than the underwater conditions. However, subsidence of the sediments was very similar for the two scenarios. Also in these experiments it was observed that most subsidence could be attributed to shrinkage and not organic matter mineralization, and the type of organic matter changed in the direction of humification. Furthermore, the water balance indicated that evapotranspiration results in higher loss of water than drainage. Still, in this case the undrained shear strength after 400 days of experiment was not enough to sustain cattle or tractors even though it increased with time.

The monitored field scale upland deposit of dredged sediments (Chapter 5) is located in the Wormer- en Jisperveld area – North Holland, the Netherlands. The deposit was filled in two stages reaching a maximum height of sediments of 195 cm. After 17 months of monitoring, the subsidence of the sediments was 119 cm to which an extra subsidence of 19.5 cm of the underlying soil due to the overburden pressure was added. The results observed in the upland deposit are in line with the laboratory and mesoscale results since subsidence could also be attributed to shrinkage and no significant changes in the organic matter content were observed. However, in the case of the upland deposit, the type of organic matter changed in the direction of humification during the first 8 months (March to November), then stabilized during 7 months (November to June), and changed in the direction of mineralization afterwards.

The outcomes of this research indicate that dredged sediments have the potential to reverse land subsidence. This statement is supported by the consistent results showing that the decrease in volume of dredged sediments is caused by shrinkage and not to organic matter mineralization as traditionally reported (Chapters 2, 3, 4, and 5).

In addition, in places where composted and stable bio-wastes are available, these can be added to dredged sediments to further reverse land subsidence. Still, in this case special attention should be given to the potential priming effect (Chapter 3).

Finally it is recommended to adapt the current practices of disposal of dredged sediments in upland deposits, since 19.5 cm of subsidence observed for the underlying soil in the upland deposit (Chapter 5), was caused by the overburden pressure of the dredged sediment. From the point of view of avoiding/reversing land subsidence it is recommended to spread thin layers (in the order of cm) of sediments over the land, although this might lead to an increase in the time and costs for the stakeholders involved in dredging and in managing the water boards.

Cadmium in soil, crops and resultant dietary exposure
Rietra, R.P.J.J. ; Mol, G. ; Rietjens, I.M.C.M. ; Römkens, P.F.A.M. - \ 2017
Wageningen : Wageningen Environmental Research (Wageningen Environmental Research rapport 2784) - 39
cadmium - soil - food intake - crops - exposure - fertilizers - food safety - toxicology - bodem - voedselopname - gewassen - blootstelling - kunstmeststoffen - voedselveiligheid - toxicologie
Mais en bodem rapport 2015
Riemens, M.M. ; Huiting, H.F. ; Deru, J.G.C. ; Schooten, H.A. van; Weide, R.Y. van der - \ 2016
Wageningen Plant Research - 76 p.
zea mays - maïs - bodem - bodembeheer - teeltsystemen - maize - soil - soil management - cropping systems
Hoe kunnen veetelers met minder input meer resultaten halen bij snijmaïsteelt? Dat is de centrale vraag van het project “Duurzaam bodembeheer maïs” (BO-31.03-001-003). Veel melkveehouderijbedrijven telen snijmaïs, een gemakkelijk te telen ruwvoergewas met een goede productie van constante hoge kwaliteit. Als zetmeelbron met een ruime energie/eiwitverhouding past het goed in het runderdieet, naast gras en graskuil. De maïsteelt kan echter nadelige effecten hebben voor de bodem door gewasbeschermingsmiddelen en het uit- en afspoelen van nutriënten. Wageningen UR en het Louis Bolk Instituut onderzoeken in opdracht van het ministerie van EZ duurzame en praktisch haalbare verbeteringen en vernieuwingen. Teeltsystemen die zorgen voor een gezonde bodem worden daarbij gezien als sleutel tot duurzame teelt. Op drie locaties worden diverse teeltsystemen vergeleken in meerjarige proeven uitgevoerd op zand- en kleigrond. Daarbij wordt onder andere gekeken naar opbrengst, onkruiddruk, bodemstructuur, aanwezigheid van regenwormen, indringingsweerstand, waterinfiltratie, stikstofdynamiek en economische aspecten. Deze kennis wordt vervolgens doorgegeven aan de praktijk middels o.a. de beslisboom snijmaïs, een instrument om praktische kennis naar veetelers en erfbezoekers te brengen.
Fosfaatonderzoek Noorderpark 2016 : bodemonderzoek t.b.v. realisatie soortenrijke schraallanden, uitbreiding bij onderzoek uit 2013
Delft, S.P.J. ; Brouwer, F. - \ 2016
Wageningen : Wageningen Environmental Research (Wageningen Environmental Research rapport 2775) - 51
bodem - fosfaten - bodemonderzoek - natuurontwikkeling - graslanden - eutrofiëring - soortenrijkdom - utrecht - soil - phosphates - soil testing - nature development - grasslands - eutrophication - species richness
In het noordwestelijk deel van het Noorderpark is onderzoek gedaan naar de abiotische geschiktheid voor soortenrijke graslanden. Hierbij zijn de nutriëntentoestand en de zuurbuffer beoordeeld. Met profielbeschrijvingen is de veraardingsgraad van veenlagen vastgesteld. Er zijn 36 boringen gedaan waarbij twee lagen bemonsterd zijn. Van drie boringen is een derde laag bemonsterd. De bodemmonsters zijn voor analyse samengevoegd tot 25 mengmonsters waaraan de analyses zijn uitgevoerd. Voor het plannen van de bemonstering en het samenstellen van de mengmonsters is een stratificatie uitgevoerd op basis van de Landschapsleutel. De nutriëntentoestand is beoordeeld op basis van de fosfaattoestand en de kans op het vrijkomen van nutriënten door mineralisatie en interne eutrofiëring. Bij de beoordeling van de fosfaattoestand is ook beoordeeld in hoeverre deze verbeterd kan worden door verschralingsbeheer of door afgraven van een deel van de bovengrond. Afhankelijk van de realisatiekans voor natuurdoelen bij verschillende maatregelen is per deelperceel een inrichtingsadvies opgesteld.
Simulation nitrogen-limited crop growth with SWAP/WOFOST : process descriptions and user manual
Groenendijk, Piet ; Boogaard, Hendrik ; Heinen, Marius ; Kroes, J.G. ; Supit, Iwan ; Wit, Allard de - \ 2016
Wageningen : Wageningen Environmental Research (Wageningen Environmental Research rapport 2721) - 59
crops - growth - soil - nitrogen - organic matter - mineralization - leaching - simulation models - nitrates - gewassen - groei - bodem - stikstof - organische stof - mineralisatie - uitspoelen - simulatiemodellen - nitraten
This report describes a soil nitrogen module (Soil-N), which is combined with the agro-hydrological model, SWAP, and the crop growth model, WOFOST. The core of the Soil-N module is a description of the nitrogen cycle, which is coupled to the organic matter cycle based upon the RothC-26.3 model. Nitrogen can be supplied to the soil as different types of fertilizer applications and through mineralisation of organic nitrogen. Ammonium and nitrate balances are calculated including uptake by plant roots, de-nitrification and leaching of nitrate. Data exchange is on a daily base. The partitioning of nitrogen within crops and the nitrogen contents of crop residues are calculated by WOFOST and passed to the Soil-N module. SWAP generates the data for establishing the water balance of the soil compartment for which the Soil-N perform the simulations. Nitrogen uptake by the crop is calculated as the minimum of the demand by the crop and the availability of nitrogen in the soil. The crop production rate is reduced when the mineral nitrogen stock is limited. Nitrogen-fixation is based on a simple approach. An improved sub-model for phenological stages of soybean was implemented. Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations can be accounted for. The innovated integrated model was tested using data sets from The Netherlands, China and Argentina, for which examples are given. This new model can be used as a tool in studies, in which both water and nitrogen can be limited for crop growth.
De bodem onder ons Bestaan
Brussaard, Lijbert - \ 2016
Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research - ISBN 9789463430081 - 24
bodem - bodembiologie - bodemkwaliteit - soil - soil biology - soil quality
Chemisch-fysische schematisering van de bodem voor NHI-waterkwaliteit : naar een nieuwe fysisch-chemische schematisering van de Nederlandse bodem
Bolt, Frank van der; Walvoort, Dennis ; Vries, Folkert de; Hoogland, Tom ; Vroon, Henk ; Groenendijk, Piet ; Renaud, Leo ; Massop, Harry ; Veldhuizen, Ab ; Walsum, Paul van - \ 2016
Wageningen : Wageningen Environmental Research (Wageningen Environmental Research rapport 2753) - 34
bodem - bodemkwaliteit - hydrologie - bodemeigenschappen - bodemkarteringen - soil - soil quality - hydrology - soil properties - soil surveys
Voor de ontwikkeling van het Nationaal Hydrologisch Instrumentarium-waterkwaliteit is een aanpak opgesteld om de fysisch-chemische schematisering van de bodem in Nederland verder te ontwikkelen. Op korte termijn (2017-2018) is een pragmatische werkwijze nodig om de bodemchemische parameters met bijbehorende schematisering in representatieve eenheden voor de operationele toepassing voor landelijke beleidsstudies te actualiseren. Het gebruik van de huidige fysischchemische karakterisering voor de bodemkaart 1:50.000 vormt de geëigende methode. Op de langere termijn is het de wens om het Nationaal Hydrologisch Instrumentarium-waterkwaliteit ook te kunnen inzetten voor regionale toepassingen. Dit kan alleen als er een gedetailleerde geostatistisch gesimuleerde 3D-bodemkaart aan ten grondslag ligt die recht doen aan regionale variabiliteit van de bodem.
Inventarisatie GIS-bestanden met informatie over bodemverstoring
Maas, G.J. ; Vries, F. de; Brouwer, F. ; Heidema, A.H. - \ 2016
Wageningen : Wageningen Environmental Research (Wageningen Environmental Research rapport 2751) - 35
bodem - archeologie - bodemverstoring - grondbewerking - geografische informatiesystemen - soil - archaeology - soil disturbance - tillage - geographical information systems
In de bodem zit een schat aan sporen van activiteiten uit het verleden. In ons dichtbevolkte land is de kans groot dat deze waardevolle archeologische resten worden aangetast door grondbewerking en graafwerkzaamheden. Dit rapport geeft een overzicht van geografische bronbestanden die gebruikt kunnen worden om gebieden te lokaliseren waar de bodem reeds verstoord is.
An in vitro – in vivo integrated approach for hazard and risk assessment of silver nanoparticles for soil organisms
Makama, S.I. - \ 2016
University. Promotor(en): Ivonne Rietjens, co-promotor(en): Nico van den Brink. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789462578432 - 190 p.
particles - nanotechnology - toxicity - earthworms - gene expression - soil - coatings - deeltjes - nanotechnologie - toxiciteit - aardwormen - genexpressie - bodem - afdeklagen

Owing to their small sizes, nanoparticles (NPs) exhibit completely different and novel characteristics compared to their bulk counterparts of the same chemical composition. These novel properties include increased reactivity due to large specific surface area, fluorescence and colour changes, increased biological barrier crossings and increased material strengthening combined with light-weight. Virtually all fields of human endeavours are exploiting nanotechnology to combat different challenges. This has led to an increase in the production and potential release of NPs into the environment. The novel properties of these NPs however, mean an enhanced potential for interactions with biological systems that are different from the interactions of known conventional chemicals, thus raising environmental and public health/safety concerns. Available literature has reported NP uptake in different organisms along with associated hazards. Therefore, to safeguard human and environmental health and safety, regulatory measures are necessary. Such measures must be based on sound scientific evidence and be risk-based rather than hazard-based. As such, the need to understand the fate of NPs after environmental release and their potential to pose hazards and risks to the environment is critical for a proper risk assessment and further development of policy strategies on the future regulation of the use of NPs.

Some studies have demonstrated different and sometimes conflicting effects of NP properties on their uptake in different organisms. Given that exposure determines whether hazards will turn into risks, there is a critical need for further systematic evaluation of the physico-chemical properties of engineered or manufactured NPs that influence uptake in terrestrial organisms, and also of how soil properties may affect these processes. The objective of this project was to determine the influence of size and surface coating (charge), two important physico-chemical properties of NPs, on their bioavailability, uptake and toxicity. The red earthworm Lumbricus rubellus, common in most parts of Europe, was used as a model soil organism. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been identified as one of the most commonly used NPs in many products, and their production is expected to continue to increase. Therefore, we selected AgNPs as our model NPs. For our investigations, we applied an integrated in vitro - in vivo approach, utilising high throughput in vitro methods as well as well-established in vivo toxicity end-points in the earthworm. A systematic experimental approach was developed for which AgNPs were synthesized in three sizes: 20, 35 and 50 nm. Surface-coating with bovine serum albumin (AgNP_BSA), chitosan (AgNP_Chit), or polyvinylpyrrolidone (AgNP_PVP) resulted in negative, positive and neutral particles respectively.

Firstly, macrophage cells (RAW 264.7) were exposed to AgNPs at 0 – 200 µg/mL (nominal concentrations) and uptake dynamics, cell viability, as well as induction of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed (Chapter 2). Generally, the adverse effects of exposure to the tested AgNPs resulted in reduced overall viability of the cells, which was similar for all AgNPs tested. On adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and specific mechanisms of toxicity (TNF-α and ROS production) however, we observed that the AgNPs differed significantly, with the negatively charged AgNP_BSA being the most toxic. Significant ROS induction was only observed after exposure to the 20 nm positively charged AgNP_Chit. Effect of size was less prominent than that of surface coating, showing mostly limited differences that were not statistically significant under our experimental conditions. Live confocal imaging of exposed cells allowed the monitoring of the uptake dynamics and subcellular cytoplasmic accumulation of AgNPs. We observed fast uptake of AgNPs within 2.5 hours which is essential in case of exposure durations of 6 and 24 hours, as applied in our experiments. However, similar uptake did not always result in similar effects.

With the insights obtained from the in vitro assessments, we investigated the effects of size and surface coating (charge) of AgNPs on the bioaccumulation in, and toxicity (survival, growth, cocoon production) to the earthworm L. rubellus. Currently, metal engineered NPs in tissues are generally quantified based on total metal concentrations after acid destruction of samples. Such destructive methods are limited in providing information on the speciation and the forms of NPs which is essential for characterising the fate of NPs. In the present thesis, we developed a method using a combination of enzymatic tissue processing and single particle inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry (sp-ICP-MS) to characterise and quantify AgNPs in tissues of earthworms (Chapter 3). Subcellular fractionation of tissues was also applied to investigate potential association of AgNPs with the cellular metallothionein (MT) containing fraction of the earthworm tissues. This study provided, to the best of our knowledge, the first estimates of tissue Ag concentrations in both particulate and ionic forms in earthworms exposed in vivo to AgNPs via soil. The results obtained showed fairly low uptake of AgNPs, with earthworms exposed to a commercially obtained PVP-coated AgNP showing approximately 34% of their total Ag tissue burden being in particulate form. This indicates that although AgNPs accumulated in tissues of earthworms in their primary form, the dissolution of Ag in the soil, organism, or both played an important role in determining the ultimate fate of the AgNPs. Although the biological uptake of AgNPs was generally low, the method described in Chapter 3 was still capable of extracting NPs in quantities sufficient for identification, quantification and characterisation. It should be noted however, that the lower size detection threshold for the ICP-MS instrument used for these analyses is approximately 30 nm. Consequently, information on NPs smaller than 30 nm was not available. With the increasing optimisation of analytical systems that combine sp-ICP-MS, or other detection methods with, for example, asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) which pre-sort different particle sizes, the potential for application of methods described in this thesis will be even greater.

Having developed a method for extracting Ag from tissues, we exposed earthworms to all nine synthesized AgNPs as well as to AgNO3 at two concentrations below known EC50s to control for ionic effects of Ag in a 28-day sub-chronic reproduction toxicity test in soil in Chapter 4. Uptake was observed to be generally highest for the negatively charged AgNP_BSA especially at the lower exposure concentration ranges. Total Ag concentrations in earthworm tissues reached a plateau level of about 80 mg Ag/kg dry weight (DW) for exposure concentrations between 15 – 100 mg Ag/kg soil DW. Reproduction was impaired at high nominal soil concentrations of all AgNPs tested, with AgNP_BSA particles being the most toxic. Size had an influence on uptake of the AgNP_PVP, showing both uptake and effect on reproduction of the 20 nm sized group to be significantly more than those of the 35 and 50 nm AgNP_PVP. This size effect however, did not hold for AgNP_BSA nor AgNP_Chit. Higher uptake from the soil may consequently lead to a higher potential for toxicity in organisms. Interestingly, internal total Ag tissue concentrations measured after 72 hour exposure were better at predicting the effect on reproduction than tissue concentrations after 28 days exposure. It is likely therefore, that reproduction was affected already in the 72 hour exposure window.

In order to further elucidate the likely mechanisms by which these AgNPs were exerting their effects, we conducted a toxicogenomic study in Chapter 5. Although AgNPs have been increasingly investigated, information regarding their effect on the gene expression profile of especially soil organisms is yet inadequate. Using RNAseq, we investigated the transcriptome and gene expression profiles of the earthworm L. rubellus, following exposure to the nine AgNPs. Overall, exposure to medium sized AgNPs at a concentration close to the EC50 for effects on cocoon production caused most pronounced responses at the transcriptional level. There was a correlation however, between the numbers of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and internal Ag concentrations in the earthworms. Within the medium size AgNPs, AgNP_BSA caused extensive transcriptional responses, with 684 genes affected. In contrast ionic silver (AgNO3) did not affect gene expression at low as well as higher exposure levels. Only one gene was regulated by all AgNP and Ag+ treatments, indicating that there was hardly any functional overlap between the responses of the organisms to AgNPs with different coatings. Remarkably, this gene was metallothionein, a cysteine-rich peptide known to strongly bind free metal ions for chelation and detoxification, which was strongly up-regulated. Gene ontology enrichment analysis for 35 nm AgNP_BSA exposures revealed a total of 33 significantly enriched gene ontology terms related to biological processes. These included responses to pH, proton transport, cell differentiation, microtubule organisation, and and MT induction. Surface coating (BSA) was important in triggering the AgNP-induced differential gene expression profiles in earthworms. The importance of physicochemical properties of NPs in influencing their fate and toxicity is thus elucidated in the current study.

The studies reported in the current thesis showed that within the range of 20 to 50 nm, effects of the size of AgNPs on toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics are limited. However, effects of surface coating were consistent over the different levels of biological integration. Generally, the negatively charged AgNP_BSA accumulated to a higher extent in the earthworms, especially at lower concentrations. The in vitro uptake was fast for all NPs, but also showed the highest uptake of AgNP_BSA. The negatively charged AgNPs were also the most toxic, likely related to their increased uptake. This was evident at all levels: gene expression, cellular, and individual (population dynamic parameters) levels. At the in vitro level, this applied mostly to effects on specific modes of action (TNF-α induction, ROS production). For more general cytotoxic effects, the effects of surface coatings were less evident. Except in cells exposed to AgNP_Chit 20 nm, where there was a slight increase in ROS production, this set of AgNPs under the experimental conditions applied, did not appear to induce the production of ROS. This was supported by the lack of expression of any ROS-related gene in the gene expression profile analyses.

Based on the results of the current research, it can be concluded that the physico-chemical properties of NPs do influence their environmental fate and toxicity. It should be noted however that general predictions on the outcome of exposure to NPs are difficult to make, and NPs should be evaluated on a case by case basis. Our research supports the use of in vitro models to limit and prioritize further in vivo studies. Studies investigating the fate and effects of NPs for soil organisms are vital for a holistic approach towards a comprehensive and adequate environmental risk assessment (ERA). The studies described in this thesis contribute to this knowledge, thereby improving our understanding of the hazards and risks due to exposure to AgNPs, thus enabling their adequate and comprehensive ERA.

Klassenindelingen voor de fosfaattoestand van de bodem, ten behoeve van de afleiding van fosfaatgebruiksnormen
Oenema, O. ; Mol, J.P. ; Voogd, J.C.H. ; Ehlert, P.A.I. ; Velthof, G.L. - \ 2016
Wageningen : Alterra, Wageningen-UR (Alterra-rapport 2743) - 39 p.
bodem - fosfaten - graslanden - bouwland - akkergronden - graslandgronden - soil - phosphates - grasslands - arable land - arable soils - grassland soils
In 2006 is het stelsel van gebruiksnormen voor stikstof en fosfaat ingevoerd in de Nederlandse landbouw om de uit- en afspoeling van stikstof en fosfaat vanuit de landbouw naar grondwater en oppervlaktewater te verminderen. In 2010 zijn de gebruiksnormen voor fosfaat gedifferentieerd naar de fosfaattoestand van de bodem. Daarbij worden vier klassen voor de fosfaattoestand van de bodem onderscheiden, namelijk arm, laag, neutraal en hoog. De grenzen tussen de klassen worden bepaald via een bepaling van het Pw-getal (voor bouwland) en het P-AL-getal (voor grasland). In 2015 heeft de Commissie Deskundigen Meststoffenwet (CDM) voorgesteld om de fosfaattoestand te bepalen op basis van een gecombineerde indicator, namelijk P-CaCl2 en het P-AL-getal, omdat een gecombineerde indicator in theorie een betere voorspelling geeft van de fosfaattoestand, en de gecombineerde indicator reeds in de praktijk en voor de bemestingsadviezen van grasland en maisland wordt toegepast. Ook speelt een rol dat het Pw-getal door verschillende analyselaboratoria niet meer wordt bepaald. In onderhavig rapport worden voor de gecombineerde indicator klassengrenzen afgeleid voor de fosfaattoestand van de bodem. Daarbij is gebruikgemaakt van een grote database (ruim 55.000 monsters) en van statistische analyses om een klassenindeling gebaseerd op het Pw-getal voor bouwland en op het P-AL-getal voor grasland om te rekenen naar een klassenindeling voor de gecombineerde indicator P-CaCl2 en het P-AL-getal. Verschillende varianten zijn voorgesteld. Effecten van de varianten op fosfaatplaatsingsruimte zijn verkend.
Ethiopian soil laboratory infrastructure : CASCAPE scoping mission
Bakker, G. ; Okx, J.P. ; Assen, M. ; Solomon, T. - \ 2016
Wageningen : Alterra, Wageningen-UR (Alterra-rapport 2722) - 35 p.
soil - laboratory methods - soil analysis - analysis - laboratory tests - ethiopia - bodem - laboratoriummethoden - grondanalyse - analyse - laboratoriumproeven - ethiopië
Food security is one of the main issues in Ethiopia. Large amounts of money are spent on food security programs set up by federal- and regional governments and other organisations. Decisionmakers, as well as researchers, share a dependency upon reliable data on soils, water and crops. The authors of this report believe that the data from the Ethiopian soil laboratories are not reliable enough for decision-making purposes. Ethiopian laboratories need to improve their analytical services. The main problems concern the organisational set-up, and not merely a lack of budgets for facilities. Apart from organisational problems, managerial-, human resources-, technical-, instrumental- and supply issues were identified.
PEARL model for pesticide behaviour and emissions in soil-plant systems
Berg, F. van den; Tiktak, A. ; Boesten, J.J.T.I. ; Linden, A.M.A. van der - \ 2016
Wageningen : Statutory Research Tasks Unit for Nature & the Environment (WOt-technical report 61) - 134 p.
pesticides - emission - models - leaching - modeling - soil - drainage - groundwater - soil plant relationships - pesticiden - emissie - modellen - uitspoelen - modelleren - bodem - grondwater - bodem-plant relaties
In the EU the risk of leaching of plant protection products is assessed according to the new regulation 1107/2009. For the assessment of this risk the FOCUS Groundwater scenarios have been developed. The PEARL model is one of the models that can be used to calculate the leaching concentration in groundwater
for these scenarios. At the national level, the GeoPEARL model is used to assess the 90th percentile in space of the plant protection product in its area of use. In this report a description is given of all processes considered to describe the fate of the plant protection product in the plant-soil system, such as transport in
the soil matrix and in the macropore domain of the soil, transformation, volatilisation and sorption in soil, and processes at the plant canopy (volatilisation, penetration into the plant tissue and phototransformation
on the plant surface). The PEARL model is integrated with the hydrological model SWAP. This report describes the most important processes to describe the hydrology of the soil system. Furthermore, the recent additions of the PEARL model for paddy rice systems, as well as those to simulate the fate in
greenhouse systems are also presented.
Kringlopen - Algemeen : Kennisclip Bogo-project e-learning
Baltissen, A.H.M.C. - \ 2016
Groenkennisnet
cycling - resource conservation - renewable resources - soil - soil fertility - biobased economy - horticulture - teaching materials - kringlopen - hulpbronnenbehoud - vervangbare hulpbronnen - bodem - bodemvruchtbaarheid - tuinbouw - lesmaterialen
Deze kennisclip maakt onderdeel uit van de lesmodule Biobased Economy van het CIV T&U.
Objective prioritization of intervention areas for the NAGA Foundation in the Kenya Tanzania border area
Maat, H.W. ter; Hutjes, R.W.A. ; Fleskens, L. ; Querner, E.P. ; Klostermann, J.E.M. ; Jaspers, A.M.J. - \ 2016
Alterra, Wageningen-UR (Alterra-rapport 2711) - 67 p.
hydrology - restoration management - climate - soil - geographical information systems - vegetation - models - tanzania - kenya - hydrologie - herstelbeheer - klimaat - bodem - geografische informatiesystemen - vegetatie - modellen
The NAGA foundation aims to establish Hydrologic Corridors, wherein re-greening and restoration of
the landscape interacts with regional rain-bringing wind patterns to intensify the local hydrologic cycle
to a point that a permanently greener and more productive ecosystem can be sustained. The initial
search area, as defined by NAGA, targets the Kenya-Tanzania border region and identified four
possible Hydrological Corridors. This report supports an objective prioritisation of potential
intervention locations in this larger domain. Therefore, readily available, geographically explicit
information on soil, vegetation, hydrology and climate, as well as institutional settings that may affect
the likelihood of success of such projects, were collected and analysed, and some climate-modelling
experiments were performed.
Combining the findings of the four themes: hydrology, soil restoration, climate, and institutions, and
ranking the four potential corridors objectively in order of priority, favours re-greening projects in the
Tanzanian corridors could provide the best starting point: especially the most eastern one. In this
area, many applicable land management options exist in combination with a high potential for
restoring soil organic matter, the highest rainfall recycling potential in the more favourable long rainy
season, and the apparent reliability of the Tanzanian governments at both national- and at local
levels. The GIS data facilitate further focus on this particular corridor in search of specific project
locations
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