Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Current refinement(s):

Records 1 - 17 / 17

  • help
  • print

    Print search results

  • export

    Export search results

  • alert
    We will mail you new results for this query: keywords==cardiovascular risk-factors
Check title to add to marked list
Functional foods and cardiometabolic diseases : International Task Force for Prevention of Cardiometabolic Diseases
Assman, G. ; Buono, P. ; Valle, E. Della; Farinaro, E. ; Ferns, G. ; Krogh, V. ; Kromhout, D. - \ 2014
Nutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases 24 (2014)12. - ISSN 0939-4753 - p. 1272 - 1300.
coronary-heart-disease - n-3 fatty-acids - randomized controlled-trial - density-lipoprotein cholesterol - dietary fiber intake - cardiovascular risk-factors - stanol ester consumption - vitamin-e - plant sterols - fish consumption
Mounting evidence supports the hypothesis that functional foods containing physiologically-active components may be healthful. Longitudinal cohort studies have shown that some food classes and dietary patterns are beneficial in primary prevention, and this has led to the identification of putative functional foods. This field, however, is at its very beginning, and additional research is necessary to substantiate the potential health benefit of foods for which the diet–health relationships are not yet scientifically validated. It appears essential, however, that before health claims are made for particular foods, in vivo randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of clinical end-points are necessary to establish clinical efficacy. Since there is need for research work aimed at devising personalized diet based on genetic make-up, it seems more than reasonable the latter be modeled, at present, on the Mediterranean diet, given the large body of evidence of its healthful effects. The Mediterranean diet is a nutritional model whose origins go back to the traditional diet adopted in European countries bordering the Mediterranean sea, namely central and southern Italy, Greece and Spain; these populations have a lower incidence of cardiovascular diseases than the North American ones, whose diet is characterized by high intake of animal fat. The meeting in Naples and this document both aim to focus on the changes in time in these two different models of dietary habits and their fall out on public health.
Reprint of: A parallel randomized trial on the effect of a healthful diet on inflammageing and its consequences in European elderly people: Design of the NU-AGE dietary intervention study
Berendsen, A.M. ; Santoro, A. ; Pini, E. ; Cevenini, E. ; Ostan, R. ; Pietruszka, B. ; Rolf, K. ; Cano, N. ; Caille, A. ; Lyon-Belgy, N. ; Fairweather-Tait, S. ; Feskens, E.J.M. ; Franceschi, C. ; Groot, C.P.G.M. de - \ 2014
Mechanisms of Ageing and Development 136-137 (2014). - ISSN 0047-6374 - p. 14 - 21.
cardiovascular risk-factors - mediterranean diet - vitamin-d - metabolic syndrome - older-adults - nutritional-status - blood-pressure - fatty-acids - weight-loss - life-style
Background The proportion of European elderly is expected to increase to 30% in 2060. Combining dietary components may modulate many processes involved in ageing. So, it is likely that a healthful diet approach might have greater favourable impact on age-related decline than individual dietary components. This paper describes the design of a healthful diet intervention on inflammageing and its consequences in the elderly. Methods The NU-AGE study is a parallel randomized one-year trial in 1250 apparently healthy, independently living European participants aged 65–80 years. Participants are randomised into either the diet group or control group. Participants in the diet group received dietary advice aimed at meeting the nutritional requirements of the ageing population. Special attention was paid to nutrients that may be inadequate or limiting in diets of elderly, such as vitamin D, vitamin B12, and calcium. C-reactive protein is measured as primary outcome. Discussion The NU-AGE study is the first dietary intervention investigating the effect of a healthful diet providing targeted nutritional recommendations for optimal health and quality of life in apparently healthy European elderly. Results of this intervention will provide evidence on the effect of a healthful diet on the prevention of age related decline.
A parallel randomized trial on the effect of a healthful diet on inflammageing and its consequences in European elderly people: Design of the NU-AGE dietary intervention study
Berendsen, A.M. ; Santoro, A. ; Pini, E. ; Cevenini, E. ; Ostan, R. ; Pietruszka, B. ; Rolf, K. ; Cano, R. ; Caille, A. ; Lyon-Belgy, N. ; Fairweather-Tait, S. ; Feskens, E.J.M. ; Franceschi, C. ; Groot, C.P.G.M. de - \ 2013
Mechanisms of Ageing and Development 134 (2013)11-12. - ISSN 0047-6374 - p. 523 - 530.
cardiovascular risk-factors - mediterranean diet - vitamin-d - metabolic syndrome - older-adults - nutritional-status - blood-pressure - fatty-acids - weight-loss - life-style
Background The proportion of European elderly is expected to increase to 30% in 2060. Combining dietary components may modulate many processes involved in ageing. So, it is likely that a healthful diet approach might have greater favourable impact on age-related decline than individual dietary components. This paper describes the design of a healthful diet intervention on inflammageing and its consequences in the elderly. Methods The NU-AGE study is a parallel randomized one-year trial in 1250 apparently healthy, independently living European participants aged 65–80 years. Participants are randomised into either the diet group or control group. Participants in the diet group received dietary advice aimed at meeting the nutritional requirements of the ageing population. Special attention was paid to nutrients that may be inadequate or limiting in diets of elderly, such as vitamin D, vitamin B12, and calcium. C-reactive protein is measured as primary outcome. Discussion The NU-AGE study is the first dietary intervention investigating the effect of a healthful diet providing targeted nutritional recommendations for optimal health and quality of life in apparently healthy European elderly. Results of this intervention will provide evidence on the effect of a healthful diet on the prevention of age related decline.
Influence of calendar period on the association between BMI and coronary heart disease: a meta-analysis of 31 cohorts : Review
Hollander, E.L. de; Bogers, R.P. ; Boshuizen, H.C. ; Rosengren, A. ; Shipley, M.J. ; Knekt, P. ; Ducimetiere, P. ; Menotti, A. ; Groot, C.P.G.M. de; Bemelmans, W.J.E. - \ 2013
Obesity 21 (2013)5. - ISSN 1930-7381 - p. 865 - 880.
body-mass index - all-cause mortality - cardiovascular risk-factors - monica project populations - life-style factors - follow-up - physical-activity - blood-pressure - western-australia - abdominal obesity
Objective: The association between obesity and coronary heart disease (CHD) may have changed over time, for example due to improved pharmacological treatment of CHD risk factors. This meta-analysis of 31 prospective cohort studies explores the influence of calendar period on CHD risk associated with body mass index (BMI). Design and Methods: The relative risks (RRs) of CHD for a five-BMI-unit increment and BMI categories were pooled by means of random effects models. Meta-regression analysis was used to examine the influence of calendar period (>1985 v =1985) in univariate and multivariate analyses (including mean population age as a covariate). Results: The age, sex, and smoking adjusted RR (95% confidence intervals) of CHD for a five-BMI-unit increment was 1.28(1.22:1.34). For underweight, overweight and obesity, the RRs (compared to normal weight) were 1.11(0.91:1.36), 1.31(1.22:1.41), and 1.78(1.55:2.04), respectively. The univariate analysis indicated 31% (95%CI: -56:0) lower RR of CHD associated with a five-BMI-unit increment and a 51% (95%CI: -78: -14)) lower RR associated with obesity in studies starting after 1985 (n = 15 and 10, respectively) compared to studies starting in or before 1985 (n = 16 and 10). However, in the multivariate analysis, only mean population age was independently associated with the RRs for a five-BMI-unit increment and obesity (-29(95%CI: -55: -5)) and -31(95%CI: -66:3), respectively) per 10-year increment in mean age). Conclusion: This study provides no consistent evidence for a difference in the association between BMI and CHD by calendar period. The mean population age seems to be the most important factor that modifies the association between the risk of CHD and BMI, in which the RR decreases with increasing age.
Nutritional Genetics: The Case of Alcohol and the MTHFR C677T Polymorphism in relation to homocysteine in a Black South African Population
Nienaber-Rousseau, C. ; Pisa, P.T. ; Venster, C.S. ; Ellis, S.M. ; Kruger, A. ; Moss, S. ; Boonstra, A. ; Towers, G.W. - \ 2013
Journal of Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomics 6 (2013)2. - ISSN 1661-6499 - p. 61 - 72.
coronary-heart-disease - cardiovascular risk-factors - plasma total homocysteine - methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase - consumption - hyperhomocysteinemia - folate - determinants - metaanalysis - frequency
Background/Aims: It is unknown whether the effect of alcohol consumption on homocysteine (Hcy) is modulated by the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T. We explored this hypothesized effect by analyzing cross-sectional data of 1,827 black South Africans. Methods: Total Hcy concentrations were determined by fluorescence polarization immunoassay and the genotype through polymerase chain reaction-based RFLP analysis. Results: Subjects harboring the 677 TT genotype had the highest Hcy. Among subjects harboring the 677 CC genotype, men had higher Hcy (p = 0.04). Age and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) correlated best (r = 0.26 and r = 0.27; p <0.05), while the percentage carbohydrate-deficient transferrin and the B vitamins correlated weakly (r <0.1; p <0.05) with Hcy. Hcy was positively associated with the reported alcohol intake (p = 0.01). There was no interaction between alcohol consumption and the MTHFR 677 CC or CT genotypes (p > 0.05) for Hcy concentrations; however, an interaction was determined for GGT and the MTHFR genotype (p = 0.02). Age, GGT, gender, MTHFR and vitamin B6 explained 16.8% of the variation in Hcy (p <0.01). Conclusion: The determined interactions might result in differences in the risk conveyed through Hcy with regard to disease development in those with unfavorable GGT concentrations.
Effects of n-3 fatty acids on cognitive decline: A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in stable myocardial infarction patients
Geleijnse, J.M. ; Giltay, E.J. ; Kromhout, D. - \ 2012
Alzheimer's & Dementia 8 (2012)4. - ISSN 1552-5260 - p. 278 - 287.
alpha-linolenic acid - cardiovascular risk-factors - alzheimer-disease - dietary-intake - cardiac-arrest - dementia risk - fish-oil - health - omega-3-fatty-acids - supplementation
Background Epidemiological studies suggest a protective effect of n-3 fatty acids derived from fish (eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA] and docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]) against cognitive decline. For a-linolenic acid (ALA) obtained from vegetable sources, the effect on cognitive decline is unknown. We examined the effect of n-3 fatty acid supplementation on cognitive decline in coronary heart disease patients. Methods The analysis included 2911 coronary patients (78% men) aged 60 to 80 years who participated in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial of n-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular diseases (Alpha Omega Trial). By using a 2 × 2 factorial design, patients were randomly assigned to margarines that provided 400 mg/d of EPA–DHA, 2 g/d of ALA, both EPA–DHA and ALA, or placebo for 40 months. Cognitive function was assessed by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) at baseline and after 40 months. The effect of n-3 fatty acids on change in MMSE score was assessed using analysis of variance. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the effects on risk of cognitive decline, defined as a decrease of 3 or more points in MMSE score or incidence of dementia. Results Patients in the active treatment groups had an additional intake of 384 mg of EPA–DHA, 1.9 g of ALA, or both. The overall MMSE score in this cohort was 28.3 ± 1.6 points, which decreased by 0.67 ± 2.25 points during follow-up. Changes in MMSE score during intervention did not differ significantly between EPA–DHA and placebo (-0.65 vs -0.69 points, P = .44) or between ALA and placebo (-0.60 vs -0.74 points, P = .12). The risk of cognitive decline was 1.03 (95% confidence interval: 0.84–1.26, P = .80) for EPA–DHA (vs placebo) and 0.90 (0.74–1.10, P = .31) for ALA (vs placebo). Conclusion This large intervention study showed no effect of dietary doses of n-3 fatty acids on global cognitive decline in coronary heart disease patients. Keywords
Lifestyle Factors of a Five-Year Community-Intervention Program The Hartslag Limburg Intervention
Wendel-Vos, G.C.W. ; Dutman, A.E. ; Verschuren, W.M.M. ; Ronckers, E.T. ; Ament, A. ; Assema, P. van; Ree, J. de; Ruland, E.C. ; Schuit, A.J. - \ 2009
American Journal of Preventive Medicine 37 (2009)1. - ISSN 0749-3797 - p. 50 - 56.
heart health-program - food frequency questionnaire - cardiovascular risk-factors - stanford 5-city project - relative validity - physical-activity - deprived neighborhoods - north karelia - disease risk - reproducibility
Background: Community-based health promotion is a widely advocated strategy in public health to favorably alter lifestyle. The aim of this study was to investigate the net effect of a cardiovascular disease-prevention program (Hartslag Limburg) on lifestyle factors after 5 years of intervention (1998-2003). Methods: In a cohort study, 5-year mean changes in lifestyle factors (energy intake; fat intake; time spent on leisure-time physical activity; walking, bicycling, and sports; and smoking behavior) between subjects from the intervention area (n=2356) and the control area (n=758) were compared for men and women and for those with a low (less than intermediate secondary education) and a moderate (intermediate vocational or higher secondary education) or high (higher vocational education or university) educational level. Adjustments were made for age and the mean of the individual pre- and post-intervention measurement of the variable under study. When stratifying for gender, adjustments were made for educational level, and vice versa. Results: In general, lifestyle factors changed unfavorably in the control group, whereas changes were less pronounced or absent in the intervention group. The adjusted difference in mean change in lifestyle factors between the intervention group and the control group was significant (p
Low-grade inflammation can partly explain the association between the metabolic syndrome and either coronary artery disease or severity of peripheral arterial disease: the CODAM study
Jacobs, M. ; Greevenbroek, M.M. ; Kallen, C.J. ; Ferreira, I. ; Blaak, E.E. ; Feskens, E.J.M. ; Jansen, E.H. ; Schalkwijk, C.G. ; Stehouwer, C.D. - \ 2009
European Journal of Clinical Investigation 39 (2009)6. - ISSN 0014-2972 - p. 437 - 444.
c-reactive protein - intercellular-adhesion molecule-1 - cardiovascular risk-factors - type-2 diabetes-mellitus - heart-disease - insulin-resistance - vascular inflammation - general-population - human hepatocytes - edinburgh artery
Background Low-grade inflammation has been hypothesized to underlie the coronary artery disease (CAD) risk associated with the metabolic syndrome, but the evidence is not conclusive. For peripheral arterial disease (PAD; as measured by the ankle-arm index), this association has not been studied before. The aim was to study whether the association between the metabolic syndrome and CAD or the severity of PAD can be explained by low-grade inflammation. Methods The Cohort study Diabetes and Atherosclerosis Maastricht population includes 574 subjects, with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, of whom 560 were included in the analyses (343 males; age: 59·5 ± 7·0 years). The inflammation markers that were measured were C-reactive protein, interleukin 6, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and serum amyloid A. All analyses were adjusted for age, sex and smoking. Results Logistic regression showed that the metabolic syndrome was significantly associated with CAD [odds ratio (OR) = 1·86, 95% CI: 1·21; 2·84, P = 0·004]. Further adjustment for inflammatory status, as captured in a combination of the inflammation markers (using an averaged Z-score), resulted in significant associations of both the metabolic syndrome and inflammatory status with CAD [ORmetabolic syndrome (95% CI) = 1·58 (1·01; 2·46), P = 0·044; ORinflammation (95% CI) = 1·59 (1·14; 2·21), P = 0·007]. Linear regression analysis showed similar results for the ankle-arm index. Conclusions The association between the metabolic syndrome, on the one hand, and prevalence of CAD or the severity of PAD, on the other, can be partly but not completely, 26% and 29% respectively, explained by low-grade inflammation
Dietary glycaemic index, glycaemic load and subsequent changes of weight and waist circumference in European men and women
Du, H. ; A, A.D. van der; Bakel, M. van; Slimani, N. ; Forouchi, N.G. ; Wareham, N. ; Halkjaer, J. ; Tjonneland, A. ; Jakobsen, M.U. ; Overvad, K. ; Schulze, M.B. ; Buijsse, B. ; Boeing, H. ; Palli, D. ; Masala, G. ; Sorensen, T. ; Saris, W.H. ; Feskens, E.J.M. - \ 2009
International Journal of Obesity 33 (2009). - ISSN 0307-0565 - p. 1280 - 1288.
food frequency questionnaire - randomized controlled-trial - cardiovascular risk-factors - resting energy-expenditure - low-fat diets - body-weight - relative validity - epic project - low-carbohydrate - abdominal obesity
Objectives: To investigate whether dietary glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) were associated with subsequent weight and waist circumference change. Design: Population-based prospective cohort study. Setting: Five European countries, which are Denmark, Germany, Italy, The Netherlands and the United Kingdom. Participants: A total of 89¿432 participants, aged 20–78 years (mean =53 years) at baseline and followed for 1.9–12.5 years (mean=6.5 years). All participants were free of self-reported cancer, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes at baseline. Methods: Glycaemic index and GL were calculated on the basis of dietary intake assessed by food frequency questionnaires and by using a GI table developed for this study with published GI values as the main sources. Anthropometric data were collected both at baseline and at the end of follow-up. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted in each centre and random-effect meta-analyses were used to combine the effects. Adjustment was made for baseline anthropometrics, demographic and lifestyle factors, follow-up duration and other dietary factors. Results: Mean GI and GL were 57 and 134, respectively. Associations of GI and GL with subsequent changes of weight and waist circumference were heterogeneous across centres. Overall, with every 10-unit higher in GI, weight increased by 34¿g per year (95% confidence interval (CI): -47, 115) and waist circumference increased by 0.19¿cm per year (95% CI: 0.11, 0.27). With every 50-unit higher in GL, weight increased by 10¿g per year (95% CI: -65, 85) and waist circumference increased by 0.06¿cm per year (95% CI: -0.01, 0.13). Conclusions: Our findings do not support an effect of GI or GL on weight change. The positively significant association between GI, not GL, and subsequent gain in waist circumference may imply a beneficial role of lower GI diets in the prevention of abdominal obesity. However, further studies are needed to confirm this finding given the small effect observed in this study.
Dietary determinants of subclinical inflammation, dyslipidemia and components of the metabolic syndrome in overweight children: a review
Zimmermann, M.B. ; Aeberli, I. - \ 2008
International Journal of Obesity 32 (2008). - ISSN 0307-0565 - p. S11 - S18.
c-reactive protein - retinol-binding-protein - tumor-necrosis-factor - cardiovascular risk-factors - insulin-resistance syndrome - low-density-lipoprotein - vitamin-a-deficiency - grade systemic inflammation - increased oxidative stress - unsaturated fatty-acids
Objective: To review and summarize the dietary determinants of the metabolic syndrome, subclinical inflammation and dyslipidemia in overweight children. Design: Review of the current literature, focusing on pediatric studies. Participants: Normal weight, overweight, or obese children and adolescents. Results: There is a growing literature on the metabolic effects of excess body fat during childhood. However, few pediatric studies have examined the dietary determinants of obesity-related metabolic disturbances. From the available data, it appears that dietary factors are not only important environmental determinants of adiposity, but also may affect components of the metabolic syndrome and modulate the actions of adipokines. Dietary total fat and saturated fat are associated with insulin resistance and high blood pressure, as well as obesity-related inflammation. In contrast to studies in adults, resistin and adiponectin do not appear to be closely linked to insulin resistance or dyslipidemia in childhood. However, circulating leptin and retinol-binding protein (RBP) 4 correlate well with obesity, central obesity and the metabolic syndrome in children. Intakes of antioxidant vitamins tend to be low in obese children and may be predictors of subclinical inflammation. Higher fructose intake from sweets and sweetened drinks in overweight children has been linked to decreased low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle size. Conclusions: Dietary interventions aimed at reducing intakes of total fat, saturated fat and free fructose, whereas increasing antioxidant vitamin intake may be beneficial in overweight children. More research on the relationships between dietary factors and the metabolic changes of pediatric obesity may help to identify the dietary changes to reduce health risks.
The precalence of the metabolic syndrome is increades in patients with GH deficiency, irrespective of long-term substition with recombinant human GH
Klaauw, A.A. ; Biermasz, N.R. ; Feskens, E.J.M. ; Bos, M.B. ; Smit, J.W. ; Roelfsema, F. ; Corssmit, E.P. ; Pijl, H. ; Romijn, J.A. ; Pereira, A.M. - \ 2007
European Journal of Endocrinology 156 (2007)4. - ISSN 0804-4643 - p. 455 - 462.
growth-hormone gh - cardiovascular risk-factors - replacement therapy - hypopituitary patients - insulin sensitivity - cushings-disease - adults - cholesterol - resistance - mortality
Objectives: Many reports demonstrate improvements in cardiovascular risk factors during GH replacement (rhGH) in adult GH deficiency (GHD). However, it remains to be determined to what extent these changes translate into a reduction of increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of long-term rhGH replacement on the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MS). Design, settings, main outcome measures: The MS was scored by the National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III definition in 50 consecutive GHD patients (45 9 years of age), before and after 2 and 5 years of rhGH replacement, and the data of untreated patients were compared with the general population using data from a Dutch population-based study (n = 1062, 44 +/- 8 years of age). Results: Hypertriglyceridaemia (46.0 vs 18.5%, P <0.0001), hypertension (66.0 vs 35.5%, P <0.0001) and abdominal obesity (38.0 vs 23.4%, P=0.0178) were more prevalent in untreated patients when compared with controls, resulting in a higher prevalence of the MS in patients (38.0 vs 15.7%, P <0.0001). During rhGH replacement at a mean dose of 0.5 +/- 0.2 mg/day resulting in IGF-I concentrations in the normal age-adjusted reference range, mean high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level increased compared with baseline (P <0.001). However, the prevalence of (components of) the MS did not change after 2 or 5 years of treatment with rhGH. Conclusion: In this study, the prevalence of the MS in patients with GHD is increased compared with healthy controls, irrespective of rhGH replacement.
Genetic variation in thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) is associated with hypertriglyceridaemia and blood pressure in diabetes mellitus
Greevenbroek, M.M.J. van; Vermeulen, V. ; Feskens, E.J.M. ; Evelo, V.T. ; Kruijshoop, M. ; Hoebee, B. ; Kallen, C.J.H. van der; Bruin, T.W.A. de - \ 2007
Diabetic medicine 24 (2007)5. - ISSN 0742-3071 - p. 498 - 504.
familial combined hyperlipidemia - endothelial growth-factor - cardiovascular risk-factors - glucose-intolerance - fatty liver - population - identification - expression - microalbuminuria - hypertension
Aims Thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) is an attractive candidate gene for diabetes or diabetic dyslipidaemia, since TXNIP is the strongest glucose-responsive gene in pancreatic B-cells, TXNIP deficiency in a mouse model is associated with hyperlipidaemia and TXNIP is located in the 1q21-1q23 chromosomal Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) locus. We set out to investigate whether metabolic effects of TXNIP that were previously reported in a murine model are also relevant in human Type 2 DM. Methods The frequency distribution of a 3' UTR single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in TXNIP was investigated in subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT; n = 379), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n = 228) and Type 2 DM (n = 230). Metabolic data were used to determine the effect of this SNP on parameters associated with lipid and glucose metabolism. Results The frequency of the TXNIP variation did not differ between groups, but within the group of diabetic subjects, carriers of the TXNIP-T variant had 1.6-fold higher triglyceride concentrations (P = 0.015; n = 136) and a 5.5-mmHg higher diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.02; n = 212) than homozygous carriers of the common C-allele, whereas in non-diabetic subjects fasting glucose was 0.26 mmol/l lower (P = 0.002; n = 478) in carriers of the T-allele. Moreover, a significant interaction between plasma glucose concentrations and TXNIP polymorphism on plasma triglycerides was observed (P = 0.012; n = 544). Conclusion This is the first report to implicate TXNIP in a human disorder of energy metabolism, Type 2 diabetes. The effect of TXNIP on triglycerides is influenced by plasma glucose concentrations, suggesting that the biological relevance of TXNIP variations may be particularly relevant in recurrent episodes of hyperglycaemia.
Determinants of longevity and all-cause mortality among middle-aged men. Role of 48 personal characteristics in 40-year follow-up of Italian Rural Areas in the Seven Countries Study.
Menotti, A. ; Lanti, M. ; Maiani, G. ; Kromhout, D. - \ 2006
Aging clinical and experimental research 18 (2006)5. - ISSN 1594-0667 - p. 394 - 406.
coronary-heart-disease - cardiovascular risk-factors - factor intervention trial - body-mass index - physical-activity - blood-pressure - cholesterol - women - survival - smoking
Background and aims: Forty-year all-cause mortality and its association with entry risk factor levels are reported for men enrolled in the Italian Rural Areas of the Seven Countries Study of Cardiovascular Diseases. Methods: Forty-eight potential risk factors were measured in 1712 men aged 40-59 at entry examination in 1960. Mortality data were collected during 40 years of follow-up. The relationship of entry risk factor levels with all-cause mortality was studied by univariate and multivariate approaches. Results: Overall death rate was 83.7%. The main causes of death were cardiovascular diseases, followed by cancer and others. The 48 risk factors were tested with univariate and multivariate approaches. In the final model, 15 risk factors were strongly and significantly related to all-cause mortality and survival. They were age, father and mother history of premature mortality, cigarette smoking, job-related physical activity (protective), body mass index (BMI) (in an inverse J-shaped fashion), mid-arm circumference (protective), mean blood pressure, forced respiratory volume in 314 seconds (protective), serum cholesterol, corneal arcus, xanthelasma, presence of cardiovascular diseases, cancer and diabetes at entry examination, Conclusions: During a 40-year period 15 mainly cardiovascular risk factors were highly predictive of all-cause mortality and survival in middle-aged men. (c) 2006, Editrice Kurtis.
Association of folate with hearing is dependent on the 5, 10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase 677C-->T mutation
Durga, J. ; Anteunis, L.J.C. ; Schouten, E.G. ; Bots, M.L. ; Kok, F.J. ; Verhoef, P. - \ 2006
Neurobiology of aging 27 (2006)3. - ISSN 0197-4580 - p. 482 - 489.
cardiovascular risk-factors - methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase - homocysteine concentrations - common mutation - disease - plasma - epidemiology - atherosclerosis - vitamin-b-12 - impairment
Vascular disease and its risk factors have been associated with the age-related hearing loss. We examined the association of elevated plasma homocysteine and its determinants with hearing levels. Pure-tone air conduction thresholds in 728 individuals with sensorineural hearing loss were not associated with homocysteine, erythrocyte folate and Vitamin B6. Low concentrations of serum folate and Vitamin B12 were associated with better hearing. When folate status was below the median, 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677TT homozygotes had similar hearing levels to subjects with a C allele. However, when folate status was above the median, MTHFR 677TT homozygotes had on an average 5 dB (p = 0.037) and 2.6 dB (p = 0.021) lower PTA-high and PTA-low hearing thresholds, respectively, than the subjects with a 677C allele. The relationship between serum folate and hearing thresholds appeared to be dependent on MTHFR 677 genotype (CC, r = 0.13, p = 0.034; TT, r = -0.10, p = 0.291). This supports the hypothesis that a greater one-carbon moiety commitment to de novo synthesis of nucleotides and an increase in formyl-folate derivatives relative to methyl-folate derivatives is protective for hearing.
Fatty acids and coronary heart disease
Woodside, J.V. ; Kromhout, D. - \ 2005
Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 64 (2005)4. - ISSN 0029-6651 - p. 554 - 564.
coronary-heart-disease - alpha-linolenic acid - sudden cardiac death - cardiovascular risk-factors - acute myocardial-infarction - placebo-controlled trial - fish consumption - dietary-fat - serum-lipids - follow-up
During the last century much evidence has accumulated to suggest that from a public health perspective the type of fat is more important than the amount of fat. Saturated and trans-fatty acids increase and both n-6 and n-3 PUFA decrease the risk of CHD. Most of the knowledge about the effects of dietary fatty acids on CHD risk is based on observational studies and controlled dietary experiments with intermediate end points (e.g. blood lipoprotein fractions). Information from high-quality randomised controlled trials on fatty acids and CHD is lacking. The Netherlands Institute for Public Health has calculated the potential health gain that can be achieved if the fatty acid composition of the current Dutch diet is replaced by the recommended fatty acid composition. The recommendations of The Netherlands Health Council are: saturated fatty acids
Is blood donation induced low iron status associated with favourable levels of OxLDL, s-ICAM-1, sVCAM-1 and vWF-antigen in healthy men.
Hoydonck, P.G.A. ; Schouten, E.G. ; Hoppenbrouwers, K.P.M. ; Temme, E.H.M. - \ 2004
Atherosclerosis 172 (2004)2. - ISSN 0021-9150 - p. 321 - 327.
ischemic-heart-disease - cardiovascular risk-factors - low-density lipoproteins - serum ferritin - myocardial-infarction - metabolic syndrome - body iron - stores - oxidation - ldl
The potential effect of iron depletion by blood donation and its relevance to cardiovascular diseases are still under debate. Markers of vascular integrity are increasingly applied in investigations of atherothrombotic diseases. In this study, we investigated whether a lower iron status through blood donation was associated with markers of vascular integrity (circulating oxidised LDL, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1 and vWF-antigen) by comparing healthy male voluntary donors to non-donors, taking into account differences in baseline characteristics. Two fasting blood samples were collected within I week from 41 donors and 39 non-donors. The iron status was estimated by measuring the concentration of plasma iron, ferritin, haemoglobin and hematocrit. The markers of iron status were all significantly lower in donors compared to non-donors, especially for ferritin concentrations. However, the lower iron status by blood donation was not reflected in the concentrations of OxLDL, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1 and vWF-antigen in men after adjustment for BMI and ratio total/HDL cholesterol. In order to avoid possible selection-bias related to donorship, we have additionally investigated the difference in marker concentrations within the non-donors, comparing low- and high-ferritin concentrations. This analysis suggests that ferritin concentration is not associated with in vivo LDL oxidation. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Higher usual dietary intake of phytoestrogens is associated with lower aortic stiffness in postmenopausal women
Schouw, Y.T. van der; Pijpe, A. ; Lebrun, C.E.I. ; Bots, M.L. ; Peeters, P.H.M. ; Staveren, W.A. van; Lamberts, S.W.J. ; Grobbee, D.E. - \ 2002
Arteriosclerosis Thrombosis and Vascular Biology 22 (2002)8. - ISSN 1079-5642 - p. 1316 - 1322.
cardiovascular risk-factors - systemic arterial compliance - low-density-lipoprotein - stage renal-disease - pulse-wave velocity - cynomolgus monkeys - soy protein - atherosclerosis progression - plasma-lipids - all-cause
Objective¿ Phytoestrogens have been postulated to protect against cardiovascular diseases, but few studies have focused on the effect of Western dietary phytoestrogen intake. Methods and Results¿ Four hundred three women with natural menopause either between 1987 and 1989 or between 1969 and 1979 were selected from the baseline data of the PROSPECT study (n=17 395). Isoflavone and lignan intake was calculated from a food-frequency questionnaire. Aortic stiffness was noninvasively assessed by pulse-wave velocity measurement of the aorta. Linear regression analysis was used. After adjustment for age, body mass index, smoking, physical activity, mean arterial pressure, follow-up time, energy intake, dietary fiber intake, glucose, and high density lipoprotein cholesterol, increasing dietary isoflavone intake was associated with decreased aortic stiffness: -0.51 m/s (95% CI -1.00 to -0.03, fourth versus first quartile, P for trend=0.07). Increasing dietary intake of lignans was also associated with decreased aortic pulse-wave velocity: -0.42 m/s (95% CI -0.93 to 0.11, fourth versus first quartile, P for trend=0.06). Results were most pronounced in older women: for isoflavones, -0.94 m/s (95% CI -1.65 to -0.22, P for trend=0.02), and for lignans, -0.80 m/s (95% CI -1.85 to -0.05), fourth versus first quartile. Conclusions¿ The results of our study support the view that phytoestrogens have a protective effect on the risk of atherosclerosis and arterial degeneration through an effect on arterial walls, especially among older women
Check title to add to marked list

Show 20 50 100 records per page

 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.