Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Results of 2-year vitamin B treatment on cognitive performance
Zwaluw, N.L. van der; Dhonukshe-Rutten, R.A.M. ; Wijngaarden, J.P. van; Brouwer, E.M. ; Rest, O. van de; Veld, P.H. in 't; Enneman, A.W. ; Dijk, S.C. van; Ham, A.C. ; Swart, K.M.A. ; Velde, N. van der; Schoor, N.M. van; Cammen, T.J.M. van der; Uitterlinden, A.G. ; Lips, P. ; Kessels, R.P.C. ; Groot, C.P.G.M. de - \ 2014
Neurology 83 (2014)23. - ISSN 0028-3878 - p. 2158 - 2166.
folic-acid supplementation - randomized controlled-trial - placebo-controlled trial - alzheimers-disease - elderly-patients - double-blind - homocysteine - metaanalysis - impairment - folate
Objective: We investigated the effects of 2-year folic acid and vitamin B12 supplementation on cognitive performance in elderly people with elevated homocysteine (Hcy) levels. Methods: This multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial included 2,919 elderly participants (65 years and older) with Hcy levels between 12 and 50 µmol/L. Participants received daily either a tablet with 400 µg folic acid and 500 µg vitamin B12 (B-vitamin group) or a placebo tablet. Both tablets contained 15 µg vitamin D3. Data were available for global cognitive functioning assessed by Mini-Mental State Examination (n = 2,556), episodic memory (n = 2,467), attention and working memory (n = 759), information processing speed (n = 731), and executive function (n = 721). Results: Mean age was 74.1 (SD 6.5) years. Hcy concentrations decreased 5.0 (95% confidence interval -5.3 to -4.7) µmol/L in the B-vitamin group and 1.3 (-1.6 to -0.9) µmol/L in the placebo group. Cognitive domain scores did not differ over time between the 2 groups, as determined by analysis of covariance. Mini-Mental State Examination score decreased with 0.1 (-0.2 to 0.0) in the B-vitamin group and 0.3 (-0.4 to -0.2) in the placebo group (p = 0.05), as determined by an independent t test. Conclusions: Two-year folic acid and vitamin B12 supplementation did not beneficially affect performance on 4 cognitive domains in elderly people with elevated Hcy levels. It may slightly slow the rate of decline of global cognition, but the reported small difference may be attributable to chance. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that 2-year supplementation with folic acid and vitamin B12 in hyperhomocysteinemic elderly people does not affect cognitive performance.
Maintenance of a healthy trajectory of the intestinal microbiome during aging: A dietary approach
Candela, M. ; Biagi, E. ; Brigidi, P. ; O'Toole, P.W. ; Vos, W.M. de - \ 2014
Mechanisms of Ageing and Development 136-137 (2014). - ISSN 0047-6374 - p. 70 - 75.
gut microbiota - fecal microbiota - immune-system - elderly-patients - human longevity - age - disease - immunosenescence - intervention - enterotypes
Sharing an intense transgenomic metabolism with the host, the intestinal microbiota is an essential factor for several aspects of the human physiology. However, several age-related factors, such as changes diet, lifestyle, inflammation and frailty, force the deterioration of this intestinal microbiota-host mutualistic interaction, compromising the possibility to reach longevity. In this scenario, the NU-AGE project involves the development of dietary interventions specifically tailored to the maintenance of a healthy trajectory of the intestinal microbiome, counteracting all processes connected to the pathophysiology of the human aging
The Effectiveness of Chronic Care Management for Heart Failure: Meta-Regression Analyses to Explain the Heterogeneity in Outcomes
Drewes, H.W. ; Steuten, L.M. ; Lemmens, L.C. ; Baan, C.A. ; Boshuizen, H.C. ; Elissen, A.M. ; Lemmens, K.M. ; Meeuwissen, J.A. ; Vrijhoef, H.J. - \ 2012
Health Services Research 47 (2012)5. - ISSN 0017-9124 - p. 1926 - 1959.
home-based intervention - quality-of-life - randomized controlled-trial - chronic illness care - acute hospital-care - disease-management - clinical-outcomes - elderly-patients - older patients - telephone intervention
Objective To support decision making on how to best redesign chronic care by studying the heterogeneity in effectiveness across chronic care management evaluations for heart failure. Data Sources Reviews and primary studies that evaluated chronic care management interventions. Study Design A systematic review including meta-regression analyses to investigate three potential sources of heterogeneity in effectiveness: study quality, length of follow-up, and number of chronic care model components. Principal Findings Our meta-analysis showed that chronic care management reduces mortality by a mean of 18 percent (95 percent CI: 0.72–0.94) and hospitalization by a mean of 18 percent (95 percent CI: 0.76–0.93) and improves quality of life by 7.14 points (95 percent CI: -9.55 to -4.72) on the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure questionnaire. We could not explain the considerable differences in hospitalization and quality of life across the studies. Conclusion Chronic care management significantly reduces mortality. Positive effects on hospitalization and quality of life were shown, however, with substantial heterogeneity in effectiveness. This heterogeneity is not explained by study quality, length of follow-up, or the number of chronic care model components. More attention to the development and implementation of chronic care management is needed to support informed decision making on how to best redesign chronic care
Nutritional assessment of residents in long-term care facilities (LTCFS): recommendations of the task force on nutrition and ageing of the IAGG Europe region and the IANA
Salva, A. ; Coll-Planas, L. ; Bruce, S. ; Groot, C.P.G.M. de; Andrieu, S. ; Abellan, G. ; Vellas, B. - \ 2009
Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging 13 (2009)6. - ISSN 1279-7707 - p. 475 - 483.
nursing-home residents - randomized controlled-trial - body-mass index - vitamin-d supplementation - minimum data set - quality-of-life - continuous process improvement - protein-calorie malnutrition - elderly-patients - older-people
Unintentional weight loss and Undernutrition are major problems among older people living in Long-Term Care Facilities (LTCF). Undernutrition manifests in LTCF particularly as weight loss and low Body Mass Index (BMI) and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality as well as with functional decline. There are many factors associated with poor nutritional status and affecting protein-energy intake and/or energy expenditure. These include age of 85 years or older, low nutrient intake, loss of ability to eat independently, swallowing and chewing difficulties, becoming bed-ridden, pressure ulcers, history of hip fracture, dementia, depressive symptoms and suffering from two or more chronic illnesses. Nutritional evaluation is an essential part of the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA). This evaluation ranges from methods such as BMI to several validated tools such as Mini-Nutritional Assessment (MNA). After diagnosis, the management of undernutrition in LTCF requires a multidisciplinary approach which may involve dietary and environmental improvements and managing multiple co-morbidities, while avoiding polypharmacy as far as possible. Finally, the need for supplementation or artificial (tube) feeding may be considered taking into account the CGA and individual needs. This document presents a succinct review and recommendations of evaluation and treatment of undernutrition.
What can we learn from the FACIT trial: A randomized, double blind, controlled trial
Durga, J. ; Boxtel, M.P.J. van; Schouten, E.G. ; Kok, F.J. ; Jolles, J. ; Katan, M.B. ; Verhoef, P. - \ 2007
Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging 11 (2007)4. - ISSN 1279-7707 - p. 320 - 324.
folic-acid supplementation - cognitive function - memory performance - elderly-patients - homocysteine - dementia - vitamin-b-12 - disease - people - folate
Effect of 3-year folic acid supplementation on cognitive function in older adults in the FACIT trial: a randomised, double blind, controlled trial
Durga, J. ; Boxtel, M.P.J. van; Schouten, E.G. ; Kok, F.J. ; Jolles, J. ; Katan, M.B. ; Verhoef, P. - \ 2007
The Lancet 369 (2007)9557. - ISSN 0140-6736 - p. 208 - 216.
participants aged 24-81 - normative data - methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase - memory performance - alzheimers-disease - vascular-disease - elderly-patients - homocysteine - education - folate
Background Low folate and raised homocysteine concentrations in blood are associated with poor cognitive performance in the general population. As part of the FACIT trial to assess the effect of folic acid on markers of atherosclerosis in men and women aged 50-70 years with raised plasma total homocysteine and normal serum vitamin B-12 at screening, we report here the findings for the secondary endpoint: the effect of folic acid supplementation on cognitive performance. Methods Our randomised, double blind, placebo controlled study took place between November, 1999, and December, 2004, in the Netherlands. We randomly assigned 818 participants 800 mu g daily oral folic acid or placebo for 3 years. The effect on cognitive performance was measured as the difference between the two groups in the 3-year change in performance for memory, sensorimotor speed, complex speed, information processing speed, and word fluency. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. This trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov with trial number NCT00110604. Findings Serum folate concentrations increased by 576% (95% CI 539 to 614) and plasma total homocysteine concentrations decreased by 26% (24 to 28) in participants taking folic acid compared with those taking placebo. The 3-year change in memory (difference in Z scores 0.132, 95% CI 0.032 to 0.233), information processing speed (0.087, 0.016 to 0.158) and sensorimotor speed (0.064, -0.001 to 0.129) were significantly better in the folic acid group than in the placebo group. Interpretation Folic acid supplementation for 3 years significantly improved domains of cognitive function that tend to decline with age.
Effect of family-style meals on energy intake and risk of malnutrition in dutch nursing home residents: A randomized controlled trial
Nijs, K.A.N.D. ; Graaf, C. de; Siebelink, E. ; Blauw, Y.H. ; Vanneste, V. ; Kok, F.J. ; Staveren, W.A. van - \ 2006
Journals of Gerontology. Series A: Biological Sciences & Medical Sciences 61 (2006)9. - ISSN 1079-5006 - p. 935 - 942.
quality-of-life - mini-nutritional assessment - social facilitation - food-intake - bioelectrical-impedance - body-composition - elderly-patients - older persons - weight-loss - care
Background. Social facilitation and meal ambiance have beneficial effects on food intake in healthy adults. Extrapolation to the nursing home setting may lead to less malnutrition among the residents. Therefore, we investigate the effect of family-style meals on energy intake and the risk of malnutrition in Dutch nursing home residents. Methods. In 2002 and 2003, a randomized controlled trial was conducted among 178 residents (mean age 77 years) in five Dutch nursing homes. Within each home, two wards were randomized into an intervention (n = 94) and a control group (n = 84). For 6 months, the intervention group received their meals family style, and the control group received the usual individual preplating services. Outcome measures were intakes of energy (kJ), carbohydrates (g), fat (g), and protein (g) and Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) score (0¿30). Results. The change in daily energy intake between the control and intervention group differed significantly (991 kJ; 95% confidence interval [CI], 504¿1479). The difference in intake of macronutrients was 29.2 g (95% CI, 13.5¿44.9) for carbohydrate, 9.1 g (95% CI, 2.9¿15.2) for fat, and 8.6 g (95% CI, 3.4¿13.6) for protein. The percentage of residents in the intervention group classified by the MNA as malnourished decreased from 17% to 4%, whereas this percentage increased from 11% to 23% in the control group
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