Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    We will mail you new results for this query: keywords==germfree-mice
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Obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and atherothrombosis: a role for the intestinal microbiota?
Knaapen, M. ; Kootte, R.S. ; Zoetendal, E.G. ; Vos, W.M. de; Dallinga-Thie, G.M. ; Levi, M. ; Stroes, E.S. ; Nieuwdorp, M. - \ 2013
Clinical Microbiology and Infection 19 (2013)4. - ISSN 1198-743X - p. 331 - 337.
lipopolysaccharide-binding protein - gut microbiota - insulin-resistance - vitamin-k - metabolic syndrome - cardiovascular-disease - innate immunity - global burden - germfree-mice - high-density
Whereas the association between intestinal microorganisms and health has been widely accepted in the area of infectious disease, recent advances have now implied a role for the intestinal microbiota in human energy balance. In fact, numerous studies support an intricate relationship between the intestinal microbiota and obesity, as well as subsequent insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Intestinal microorganisms also seem to be involved in haemostatic tone and atherogenesis. However, as most of the findings stem from observational data, intervention studies in humans using interventions selectively aimed at altering the composition and activity of the intestinal microbiota are crucial to prove causality. If substantiated, this could open the arena for modulation of the intestinal microbiota as a future target in obesity-associated disease, both as a diagnostic test for personalized algorithms and for selective therapeutic strategies
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