Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Authenticity and the Contradictions of the “Ecotourism Script” : Global Marketing and Local Politics in Ghana
Büscher, Bram ; Bremer, Renée van den; Fletcher, Robert ; Koot, Stasja - \ 2017
Critical Arts 31 (2017)4. - ISSN 0256-0046 - p. 37 - 52.
authenticity - development - ecotourism - Ghana - marketing - politics
Tourism in Ghana has been developing rapidly over the last decade. By marketing over a dozen “community ecotourism” sites, particularly around monkey and forest sanctuaries, Ghana hopes to attract travellers to spend money in the country and so aid local development and protect natural resources. This paper analyses this trend, outlining several contradictions in the country’s national branding of “authenticity” in ecotourism and how this takes local shape in the case of the Tafi-Atome monkey sanctuary in Eastern Ghana. We propose that actors on different levels in Ghana appear to market and brand ecotourism according to a “script” that directs and influences local ecotourism practices in ways that obscure these contradictions and thereby enable continuation of and belief in the script. We conclude that this “ecotourism script” is central to the promotion and implementation of ecotourism in general, and needed to maintain the belief that the activity is an important conservation and development panacea.
Step-change: how micro-entrepreneurs enter the upcoming middle-class market in developing and emerging countries
Babah Daouda, Falylath - \ 2017
University. Promotor(en): Hans van Trijp, co-promotor(en): Paul Ingenbleek. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789463436298 - 225
marketing - developing countries - entrepreneurship - small businesses - medium sized businesses - economic development - economic situation - gender relations - gender - ontwikkelingslanden - ondernemerschap - kleine bedrijven - middelgrote bedrijven - economische ontwikkeling - economische situatie - man-vrouwrelaties - geslacht (gender)

In developing and emerging (D&E) countries, the large number of poor people, most of whom are female, earn a living based on small-scale self-employed units established in subsistence marketplaces in the large informal sector. With the recent rise of middle-classes in developing and emerging countries, micro-entrepreneurs, can potentially lift themselves out of poverty by seizing the opportunities provided by the new upcoming middle-class (UMC) customers. To exploit these opportunities micro-entrepreneurs have to make a step-change away from their current customers in subsistence marketplaces to create higher value propositions for UMC customers. As a strategic marketing decision, the step-change inherently comes with challenges in developing resources and capabilities required to cater to UMC customers. It hosts potential conflicts between informal- and formal-sector stakeholders as it requires both new resources and continued access to existing resources. The findings suggest that step-change is a three-step process consisting of three market entries, into, “passing-by customers”, UMC, and business markets. The value propositions associated with these markets are also hierarchical in terms of quality, quantity, consistency, and complexity. Although the processes within the steps (motivations, opportunity recognition, assessing the need of resources, resource accumulation and (re-)integration, value proposition, and market entry) have a similar structure, their content differs between steps. The findings also indicate that gender issues vary by step. Whereas, in step 1 and 3 gender differences are less remarkable, they are more pronounced in step 2, where women mainly use their relationships with individuals to access resources whereas men use both individuals and groups to access resources. The thesis suggests that to initiate and sustain step-changes, both female and male entrepreneurs have to invest in capability-building.

Understanding heterogeneity in decision-making among elderly consumers: the case of functional foods
Zanden, Lotte D.T. van der - \ 2017
University. Promotor(en): Hans van Trijp, co-promotor(en): Ellen van Kleef; Rene de Wijk. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789463431439 - 161
voedselopname - ouderen - voedselsamenstellingtabellen - voedselverrijking - ouderenvoeding - leeftijdsgroepen - marketing - marketing van voedingsmiddelen - ziekenhuisdiëten - besluitvorming - consumenten - voedselconsumptie - food intake - elderly - food composition tables - food enrichment - elderly nutrition - age groups - food marketing - hospital diets - decision making - consumers - food consumption

The population of elderly has grown considerably over the past few decades, due to reduced birth rates and increased life expectancy. Old age is, however, still associated with a higher incidence of various health conditions that pose a threat to quality of life and result in high healthcare costs. Various products and services could help elderly to stay active and healthy for longer if they were adopted, such as mobility aids, home modifications and functional foods. A key challenge is to position products and services like these on the market in such a way that elderly can see their value and will start using them. In doing this, it is crucial to know what elderly need and to understand how they make decisions. This thesis therefore aims to provide a deeper understanding of decision-making among elderly consumers. It does so using functional foods as an example, and concentrates on answering the following research questions: 1) Which types of wants, inferences and intentions characterize the elderly consumer population? 2) What are relevant ways to distinguish between elderly consumers? and 3) How can elderly consumers be motivated to form consumption intentions for products and services aimed at promoting their wellbeing?

An experience-sampling paradigm shows that there are age-related differences in both desires (i.e. wants), such as the desire for food, and goals, such as the goal to work (i.e. intentions), but not in the way these wants and intentions interact with each other (Chapter 2). Young and old consumers experience the same types of conflict between their wants and intentions. The extent of conflict does change with age however, such that older adults experience conflict less often and less strongly than younger adults. This age-related difference can be partly explained by the way in which consumers perceive the time they have left in their lives. Those who perceive time as limited, experience more conflict. Zooming in on product-specific decision-making, a series of focus groups indicates that elderly consumers overall want to use healthy products that they use frequently as a basis for enrichment with protein (Chapter 3). Most elderly do not display intentions to purchase and use such products, however, either because they do not feel the need to use functional foods or because they hold various negative inferences regarding functional foods, such as a high price or bad taste. Importantly, elderly consumers differ strongly in their wants, inferences and intentions, suggesting that segmentation of this population is warranted.

A narrative review reveals that there are various ways to segment the elderly consumer population, for example based on age, future time perspective or purchase behaviour, and every approach has its strengths and weaknesses (Chapter 4). Based on the objectives of a segmentation approach one can, however, make an informed decision regarding which segmentation base to use. In the functional food market, elderly consumers may best be segmented using a segmentation base on the food or product level (i.e. rather than the person level) that results in segments in which consumers have similar needs and wants, for example the attributes benefits that consumers seek. A segmentation study shows that using such a segmentation base results in segments that provide concrete instructions for the development of functional foods (Chapter 5). The resulting segments of elderly have unique preferences that do not necessarily reflect those of the average elderly consumer and thereby provide useful insights that can help increase our understanding of elderly consumers.

Segmentation also provides a basis for tailoring products to the needs and wants of elderly consumers. A segmentation study illustrates that such tailoring can increase elderly consumers’ willingness to try protein-enriched foods for the first time (i.e. trial purchase), as well as their willingness to use such products on a more regular basis (i.e. repeat purchase) (Chapter 5). For a small group of elderly, tailoring proves to be ineffective, however, as they categorically reject all types of protein-enriched foods presented to them. These elderly are relatively uninterested in the concept of functional foods, which may be due to negative inferences surrounding such products. Overcoming the activation of such negative inferences may be useful in motivating elderly consumers to use protein-enriched foods. A field study in a hospital setting shows that the implementation of a verbal prompt intervention that motivates consumers to make decisions without much can increase the consumption of protein (Chapter 6). By understanding and capitalizing on cognitive biases in human decision-making, interventions like these can motivate consumers to form consumption intentions even when they hold negative inferences about products or services.

Overall, this thesis shows that although elderly consumers share an age bracket they are strongly heterogeneous in their wants, inferences and intentions. This heterogeneity is robust, as it can even be observed when zooming in on decision-making regarding a specific product category (i.e. protein-enriched foods). Our understanding of the elderly consumer population increases by studying this heterogeneity, as it provides insights beyond those that apply to the group of elderly that reflect the average. In studying heterogeneity, it pays off to focus on bases that are predictive of behaviour while demographic characteristics like age provide only few insights. Industry and health institutions can also benefit from an increased understanding of the composition of the elderly population and how they make decisions. Such understanding may provide them with concrete instructions for the development and commercialization of products and services for this growing group of consumers.

The design and impact of a marketing training to strengthen customer value creation among Ethiopian pastoralists
Teklehaimanot, Mebrahtu Leake - \ 2017
University. Promotor(en): Hans van Trijp, co-promotor(en): Paul Ingenbleek; Workneh Kassa Tessema. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789463434522 - 195
marketing - training - educational courses - pastoral society - pastoralism - value added - ethiopia - east africa - opleiding - lerarenopleidingen - pastorale samenleving - pastoralisme - toegevoegde waarde - ethiopië - oost-afrika

As the world population is expected to expand beyond 9 billion by 2050, food production will need to increase by approximately 70% to feed the population. Furthermore, a growing part of that expanding population pertains to an upcoming middle class, leading to an increasing demand for high-value products, animal protein and safer food. To respond to this growing demand in terms of quantity and quality, supply chains are pushing market-frontiers deeper into the rural areas in developing and emerging markets to secure their supplies. As a consequence, rural smallholders including pastoralists, who have been functioning at local markets, are increasingly integrating with international markets. While such integration opens opportunities for the smallholders to access higher purchasing power, it is difficult for remote and isolated pastoralists with limited productive resources and limited institutional support to recognize and seize the opportunities. Because pastoralists are mostly isolated from the other value chain members, they have not developed the knowledge regarding how the market functions and what the value chain members want. By conducting a field experiment among a group of Ethiopian pastoralists, this thesis shows that marketing training is an important approach in enhancing the market knowledge of pastoralists that enable them to understand the market environment, to reproduce their animals as per market requirements and to generate returns. The thesis also has implications for other rural smallholders that share similar characteristics with the pastoralists.

Smallholder Dairy Value Chain Interventions; The Kenya Market-led Dairy Programme (KMDP) – Status Report
Rademaker, I.F. ; Koech, R.K. ; Jansen, A. ; Lee, J. van der - \ 2016
Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation (Report CDI-16-018 ) - 70 p.
dairy farming - value chain analysis - supply chain management - small businesses - farmers - milk production - marketing - kenya - melkveehouderij - waardeketenanalyse - ketenmanagement - kleine bedrijven - boeren - melkproductie
The Kenya Market-led Dairy Programme (KMDP) is a 4.5-year programme funded by the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands and implemented by SNV Netherlands Development Organisation in collaboration with stakeholders in the dairy industry. The overall goal of KMDP is to contribute to the development of a vibrant and competitive private sector-driven dairy sector in Kenya, with beneficiaries across the value chain. KMDP has two pillars, or strategic intervention levels. The first pillar is the smallholder dairy value chain, which has the objective to increase efficiency, effectiveness and inclusiveness in this production and marketing channel. The second pillar concerns systemic issues in the sector, where the objective is to promote and support interventions and innovations in feed and fodder supply, milk quality, practical skills development and the policy or regulatory environment. Work in the second pillar partly supports work in the first pillar and partly addresses issues in the enabling environment and supporting systems. In the smallholder dairy value chain, KMDP has engaged with eighteen farmer-owned milk collection and bulking enterprises (CBEs), dispersed over three main milksheds in Kenya: North Rift region, Central region, and Eastern region (Meru). In addition, KMDP works with two processors that receive and process milk from a number of the eighteen supported CBEs. This report describes the work of KMDP in the smallholder dairy value chain. It looks at the response of CBEs, processors and farmers to KMDP’s interventions, which cover five themes: 1. Capacity building of CBEs in governance and financial management; 2. Training and extension activities for farmers; 3. Fodder development and preservation at CBE- and farmer level; 4. Business development through linkages with input suppliers and service providers; 5. Milk procurement and milk quality along the value chain.
Geïntegreerde beheersing ziekten en plagen in robuuste teeltsystemen : 'Systeemsprongen' geven richting aan onderzoeksagenda
Salm, Caroline van der - \ 2016
horticulture - greenhouse horticulture - agricultural research - integrated control - plant protection - cropping systems - plant breeding - crop monitoring - marketing - workshops (programs)

De glastuinbouw wil nagenoeg emissie- en residuvrij produceren en minder afhankelijk worden van chemische gewasbescherming. Caroline van de Salm van Wageningen UR Glastuinbouw is projectleider van deze PPS.

Understanding place brands as collective and territorial development processes
Donner, M.I.M. - \ 2016
University. Promotor(en): F. Fort; Cees Leeuwis, co-promotor(en): Sietze Vellema. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789462577992 - 178 p.
rural sociology - food consumption - food - branding - marketing - morocco - france - regional development - rural development - tourism - international tourism - rurale sociologie - voedselconsumptie - voedsel - brandmerken - marokko - frankrijk - regionale ontwikkeling - plattelandsontwikkeling - toerisme - internationaal toerisme

Place branding strategies linking marketing to places have received increasing attention in practice and theory in the past two decades. It is generally assumed that place branding contributes to the economic, social, political and cultural development of cities, regions and countries. But there exists neither a commonly accepted definition nor a sound theoretical framework for place branding research. Studies have until now mainly focused on nations and cities, while the regional scale has rather been neglected, even more in the context of Mediterranean countries. In addition, little is yet known about the conditions, processes, and outcomes of place branding.

The objective of this thesis is to contribute to the clarification of the place branding concept and to a broader understanding of this rich and complex phenomenon. The focus is on the underlying conditions, processes and dynamics of place branding in regions that contributes to territorial development. Place branding is related to local food products and tourism for sustainable territorial development in Mediterranean rural regions (in France and Morocco).

The introduction chapter outlines the societal and theoretical context of place branding regarding this thesis. Place brands have emerged as attempts to respond to intertwined and multifaceted economic, political and socio-cultural challenges: to the externalities of globalisation, to local development challenges due to regionalisation and decentralisation processes, and to socio-economic tensions in the Mediterranean basin and its food domain. Accordingly, three established literature streams are mobilized: the marketing and branding of places, regional studies and sociology. It is supposed that insights from the three disciplines are needed to understand the conditions, processes and development outcomes of regional branding. This leads to three units of analysis: the first deals with place branding in a narrow sense, understanding it as marketing strategy for the development of places and their local assets based on a distinctive territorial identity; the second considers territorial development policies and public-private interactions; and the third analyses place-based, collective and embedded processes among various actors in rural areas.

Chapter 2 comprises a case study of the Sud de France brand in the region Languedoc-Roussillon, which is mainly used for the valorisation and promotion of local wines, food and tourism, but also serving institutional aims. It is a study of local dynamics and the process of regional branding, leading to beneficial outcomes stemming from a public development intervention. It demonstrates various economic and non-economic benefits created by a place brand and unfolds some of its working mechanisms, such as horizontal and vertical relations among different territorial actors, a multiple stakeholder involvement, or the linkage of a place brand with its political, social and economic context.

Chapter 3 is a continuation of Chapter 2, as it further investigates the kind of value that can be created by a place brand for different stakeholders, using the Sud de France case. Based on stakeholder and brand equity theory, it develops a measurement model and monitoring tool for the value of place brands. Results show that various place brand value dimensions coexist, according to the expectations of four identified key stakeholder groups. These value dimensions include economic, socio-cultural and environmental indicators.

Chapter 4 offers a comparison of four regional branding initiatives in Europe, with the aim to gain insights into the general conditions, as well as context-dependent factors for successfully developing and maintaining place brands. It combines a marketing perspective with the sociology of food and endogenous rural development, and analyses strategic and operational brand management aspects, as well as contextual factors. Findings indicate the importance of various embeddedness dimensions for regional branding, such as public policies, cooperation and governance forms, territorial identity and the anchorage of local actors in their places.

Chapter 5 is an explorative case study of place branding in the province of Chefchaouen, Morocco, in order to find out whether and how it would be possible to implement there a place brand as a coherent and collective territorial development project. Preconditions and various initiatives towards place branding are analysed at three action levels (macro, meso, micro). Specific attention is given to local cooperation and network activities, to leadership and political unity, being strongly related to the question of territorial governance. The main insight gained from the Chefchaouen case is that a collective place brand could be a useful tool for cross-sector cooperation, territorial governance and development, but that currently Moroccan regions still lack sufficient autonomy to fully develop their own territorial projects.

The final chapter builds upon the research findings to highlight conceptual differences between diverse brands related to places. The main conclusion of this thesis is that place brands in regions – in order to be able to support agribusiness and local development – must be considered as more than mere marketing instruments, but as dynamic, collective and embedded territorial development processes. These insights lead to conceptual and theoretical, methodological, as well as policy and managerial implications, for place branding research and practice. A main suggestion for further research is to use complex systems theory to cover the complexity of place brands.

Natuurinclusief ondernemen: Van koplopers naar mainstreaming?
Smits, M.J.W. ; Heide, C.M. van der; Dagevos, H. ; Selnes, T. ; Goossen, C.M. - \ 2016
Wageningen : Wettelijke Onderzoekstaken Natuur & Milieu (WOt-technical report 63) - 78 p.
Rijksnatuurvisie, natuurinclusief ondernemen, natuurvriendelijke bedrijven, marketingtheorie, - ondernemerschap - natuurbeheer - natuurbeleid - marketing - natuur - participatie - biologische landbouw - entrepreneurship - nature management - nature conservation policy - nature - participation - organic farming
In de Rijksnatuurvisie is een belangrijke rol weggelegd voor particulier initiatief in het natuurbeleid, met name voor bedrijven. Hiervoor wordt de term ‘natuurinclusief ondernemen’ geïntroduceerd. In de praktijk zien we daadwerkelijk steeds meer ondernemers die natuur meenemen in hun businesscase. Anderzijds zijn er ook talrijke ondernemers die deze stap (nog) niet hebben gemaakt. Om de ambitie zoals beschreven in de Rijksnatuurvisie waar te maken, is het nodig dat er een breed gedragen visie ontstaat bij bedrijven dat natuurvriendelijk ondernemerschap de toekomst heeft. Dit noemen we mainstreaming. Maar hoe realistisch is de verwachting dat een groot deel van de bedrijven deze omslag naar natuurvriendelijk ondernemen maakt de komende periode? Dit rapport geeft een reflectie op de ambities zoals beschreven in de Rijksnatuurvisie voor een transitie naar een natuurinclusieve economie, en met name de verwachtingen voor natuurinclusief handelen door ondernemers. Daarbij focussen we op enkele sectoren met veel grond, te
weten de (biologische) landbouw, de recreatiesector en het particulier landgoedbezit.
Marketing Novel Fruit Products : Evidence for Diverging Marketing Effects Across Different Products and Different Countries
’T Riet, Jonathan Van; Onwezen, M.C. ; Bartels, Jos ; Lans, I.A. Van Der; Kraszewska, Magdalena - \ 2016
Journal of Food Products Marketing 22 (2016)3. - ISSN 1045-4446 - p. 332 - 349.
adoption - fruit consumption - marketing - novel food products

The purpose of this study was to compare the influence of four different marketing claims and price information on consumers’ product choices for novel fruits and novel fruit products, using a choice experiment. In total, 1,652 people in Greece (n = 400), the Netherlands (n = 419), Poland (n = 423), and Spain (n = 410) participated in the study. The marketing claims entailed (1) information about scientific findings concerning health benefits, (2) social norm information, (3) information about the products’ naturalness, and (4) information about the products’ time-until-expiration. The results showed that all four marketing claims and price information influenced consumer choice, but the effect of naturalness depended on the specific novel fruit product being advertised, and the effect of time-until-expiration depended on both country and fruit product. These results suggest that marketing communications should be tailored to different national markets and to specific fruit products.

Sustainable consumption and marketing
Dam, Y.K. van - \ 2016
University. Promotor(en): Hans van Trijp. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789462576490 - 176 p.
consumer behaviour - marketing - consumption - household consumption - market research - decision making - behavioural changes - behaviour - economic psychology - sustainability - consumentengedrag - consumptie - huishoudelijke consumptie - marktonderzoek - besluitvorming - gedragsveranderingen - gedrag - economische psychologie - duurzaamheid (sustainability)

Sustainable development in global food markets is hindered by the discrepancy between positive consumer attitudes towards sustainable development or sustainability and the lack of corresponding sustainable consumption by a majority of consumers. Apparently for many (light user) consumers the ‘importance’ of ‘sustainability’ has a meaning that is not directly translated into purchases.

The cognitive and motivational perceptual structures of sustainability among light users of sustainable products are empirically compared to the Brundlandt definition (needs of future generations) and the Triple-P-Baseline (people, planet, prosperity) definition of sustainability. Results show that light users cognitively can distinguish between the social and temporal dimensions of the Brundlandt definition, as well as the people, planet and prosperity dimensions of the Triple-P definition of sustainability. In the motivational structure of light users of sustainable products, all attributes that do not offer direct and personal benefits are collapsed into a single dimension. This single dimension explains purchases more parsimoniously than a more complex structure, and is itself explained by a set of psychographic predictors that appears to be related to identity.

Perceived relevance and determinance are two distinct constructs, underlying the overall concept of attribute importance. Attribute relevance is commonly measured by self-reported importance in a Likert type scale. In order to measure attribute determinance a survey based measure is developed. In an empirical survey (N=1543) determinance of sustainability related product attributes is measured through a set of forced choice items and contrasted to self-reported relevance of those attributes. In line with expectations, a priori determinance predicts sustainable food choice more efficiently than perceived relevance. Determinance of sustainability related product attributes can be predicted by future temporal orientation, independently of relevance of these attributes.

These results support an interpretation of the attitude to behaviour gap in terms of construal level theory, and this theory allows for testable hypotheses on low construal motivators that should induce light users to purchase sustainable products. Sustainable consumption is viewed as a dilemma between choices for immediate (low construal) benefits and choices that avoid long-term collective (high construal) harm.

Identity theory suggests that self-confirmation could be a driving motive behind the performance of norm-congruent sustainable behaviour. Through identity people may acquire the intrinsic motivation to carry out pro-environmental behaviour. This view is tested in two empirical studies in The Netherlands. The first study shows that sustainable identity predicts sustainable preference, and that the effect of identity on preference is partly mediated by self-confirmation motives. The second study confirms that sustainable identity influences the determinance of sustainable attributes, and through this determinance has an impact on sustainable product choice. This effect is partly mediated by stated relevance of these attributes.

Sustainable certification signals positive sustainable quality of a product, but fail to create massive demand for such products. Based on regulatory focus theory and prospect theory it is argued that negative signalling of low sustainable quality would have a stronger effect on the adoption of sustainable products than the current positive signalling of high sustainable quality. The effects of positive vs. negative signalling of high vs. low sustainable quality on attitude and preference formation are tested in three experimental studies. Results show (1) that negative labelling has a larger effect on attitude and preference than positive labelling, (2) that the effect of labelling is enhanced by regulatory fit, and (3) that the effect of labelling is mediated by personal norms, whereas any additional direct effect of environmental concern on preference formation is negligible.

Overall the present thesis suggests that the attitude to behaviour gap in sustainable consumption can be explained as a conflict between high construal motives for the abstract and distant goals of sustainable development and the low construal motives that drive daily consumption. Activating low construal motives for sustainable consumption, be it intrinsic motives to affirm a sustainable self-concept or loss aversion motives, increases sustainable consumer behaviour. Applying these insights to marketing decision making opens a new line of research into the individual, corporate, and institutional drivers that may contribute to the sustainable development of global food markets.

De consument wil smaak...maar welke smaak?
Verkerke, W. ; Labrie, C.W. - \ 2016
Kas Magazine / TuinbouwCommunicatie 2016 (2016)01. - ISSN 1878-8408 - p. 20 - 22.
tuinbouw - tomaten - paprika's - meloenen - aardbeien - smaak - consumentenpanels - smaakonderzoek - marketing - modellen - horticulture - tomatoes - sweet peppers - melons - strawberries - taste - consumer panels - taste research - models
Marktgericht produceren begint bij de smaak. Maar van welke smaak houdt de consument? Wageningen UR Glastuinbouw ontwikkelde een meetmodel voor de smaak van tomaten, paprika's en meloenen en werkt nu aan de aardbei. Bovendien brengt het de smaak van consumententypen in kaart. "Als je de smaakvoorkeur van consumenten kent, dan kun je pas écht produceren voor de markt."
Telersvereniging Paletti Growers kijkt over eigenbelang heen: 'Redeneren vanuit het winkelschap, in plaats vanuit product'
Splinter, Gerben - \ 2015
horticulture - greenhouse horticulture - ornamental crops - cut flowers - pot plants - bedding plants - logistics - farm management - associations - salesmanship - supermarkets - consumer satisfaction - entrepreneurship - marketing - germany - netherlands
'Wat triggert de kopers van jouw product?' : actualiteitenavond Bovenkarspel
Gude, Henk - \ 2015
horticulture - ornamental bulbs - tulips - knowledge transfer - coating - scalding - marketing - turnover
De actualiteitenavond die op 9 september, op initiatief van KAVB en CNB, plaatsvond in bij CNB in Bovenkarspel stond bol van de waardevolle informatie voor het vak. Zo was er een update over het onderzoek naar de effecten van bolcoating, en ging Flora- Holland in op het nieuwe broeiseizoen en de marketing van tulp. De grote vraag blijft immers: voor wie produceer je nou eigenlijk? En wat verwacht de consument van jouw product?
Influence consumer behaviour for product development (LEI Wageningen UR)
Reinders, M.J. - \ 2015
LEI Wageningen UR
product development - marketing - marketing policy - marketing techniques - food merchandising - food advertising - consumer attitudes - food acceptability - consumer behaviour - food technology - productontwikkeling - marketingbeleid - marketingtechnieken - reclamecampagne van voedsel - levensmiddelenreclame - houding van consumenten - voedselacceptatie - consumentengedrag - voedseltechnologie
LEI Wageningen UR can give you insights to better understand consumer considerations and to integrate them in your product development. Please contact Machiel Reinders from LEI Wageningen UR for more information.
Enhancing governance for sanitation marketing in DRC : Creating an enabling environment for sanitation marketing
Klaver, D.C. - \ 2015
Wageningen : Centre for Development Innovation - p. 1 - 38.
marketing - marketing policy - sanitation - new sanitation - governance - civil rights - congo democratic republic - east africa - marketingbeleid - volksgezondheidsbevordering - nieuwe sanitatie - burgerrechten - democratische republiek kongo - oost-afrika
This report is one of the results of the ‘Sanitation Marketing in Equateur Province’ project in RDC, in which Wageningen UR and Oxfam Great Britain (Oxfam GB) work together.

• It Describes the characteristics of different governance arrangements that address sanitation problems in Gemena in terms of actors involved and decision-making process and power;
•Assesses the strengths and weaknesses of these different governance arrangements in solving collective problems in the field of sanitation, and
•Presents different policy propositions on how to create more enabling governance arrangements for the sustainable provision of sanitation services.
Nieuwe kansen voor traditionele groenten : Traditional Food Network to improve the transfer of knowledge for innovation (TraFooN)
Kik, Chris - \ 2015
horticulture - vegetables - regional specialty products - old varieties - knowledge transfer - workshops (programs) - eu regulations - marketing - networks
Exit strategies for social venture entrepreneurs
Nuer, A.T.K. - \ 2015
University. Promotor(en): Gert van Dijk; Hans van Trijp, co-promotor(en): Joost Jongerden. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789462575684 - 227
ondernemerschap - bedrijfsmanagement - markten - marktstructuur - marketing - ontwikkelingslanden - entrepreneurship - business management - markets - market structure - developing countries

Key Words: Social Venture Entrepreneurs, Exit, Ownership

Social Venture Entrepreneurs invest in local and mostly bottom of pyramid (BoPs), and more so in developing economies. Different understanding and meanings given to the term exit and ownership, by social venture entrepreneurs and local communities with varied cultural business practices, are highlighted in this thesis. Results from this thesis show that it is important to factor in local and cultural practices into current social venture business models. This will help to ensure the sustainability and scale up of social ventures.

The study explores exit options within business and development management literature. There were limited scientific related social entrepreneurship literatures on the subject matter at the inception of this study. The choice to conduct a qualitative case study was made in order to bring to out the forms and meanings of exit, as well as perceived exit, and ownership forms expected or anticipated by both the social venture entrepreneur and related stakeholders, such as communities and local partners, covered in this study

Van het erf naar de stad : Samen met collega's een boerenwinkel in de stad openen, hoe pak je dat aan?
Schoutsen, M.A. ; Vijn, M.P. ; Boxtel, M. van - \ 2015
Ekoland (2015)5. - ISSN 0926-9142 - p. 14 - 15.
biologische landbouw - boerderijwinkels - neveninkomsten - relaties tussen stad en platteland - houding van consumenten - klantrelaties - economische samenwerking - bedrijfsvoering - voedselproductie - marketing - multifunctionele landbouw - organic farming - on-farm sales - supplementary income - rural urban relations - consumer attitudes - customer relations - economic cooperation - management - food production - multifunctional agriculture
De boerderijwinkel is een bekend verschijnsel. Maar komt de consument wel naar je toe? Een mogelijkheid is het starten van een boerenwinkel in de stad. Waarbij je als boeren zelf de winkel runt, en zo de marge goed houdt. Samenwerkende ondernemers van de Groene Marke en de Vechtdalmarke lukt dat met winkels in Zwolle, Dalfsen en Ommen.
Health, comfort, energy use and sustainability issues related to the use of biobased building materials : to what extent are the effects supported by science and data? : what are next steps to take?
Visser, C.L.M. de; Wijk, C.A.P. van; Voort, M.P.J. van der - \ 2015
Lelystad : Applied Plant Research of Wageningen UR, Business Unit arable farming, multifunctional agriculture and field production of vegetables (PPO-Rapport 641) - 43
bouwmaterialen - biobased economy - materialen uit biologische grondstoffen - binnenklimaat - eigenschappen - innovatie adoptie - marketing - duurzaamheid (sustainability) - energiebesparing - building materials - biobased materials - indoor climate - properties - innovation adoption - sustainability - energy saving
With the exception of wood, the use of natural (biobased) materials (based on hemp, flax, straw or other natural resources) is still limited. Nevertheless, many benefits are attributed to these materials in terms of a healthier and more comfortable indoor climate. Other potential benefits of natural insulation materials that are often mentioned are energy savings and reduced environmental impact. This report focuses on the empirical support for these claims, identifies research gaps and suggests, where appropriate, recommendations for next steps.
Focus op eigenschappen en grondstoffen nodig : groei in verschillende deelmarkten voor bioplastics
Bolck, Christiaan - \ 2015
bioplastics - biobased materials - biobased economy - properties - consumer behaviour - marketing
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