Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Biomarkers of Dairy Fatty Acids and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis
Oliveira Otto, M.C. de; Nettleton, J.A. ; Lemaitre, R.N. ; Steffen, L.M. ; Kromhout, D. ; Rich, R.L. ; Tsai, M.Y. ; Jacobs, D.R. ; Mozaffarian, D. - \ 2013
Journal of the American Heart Association 2 (2013). - ISSN 2047-9980 - 11 p.
intima-media thickness - physical-activity - dietary patterns - plasma-lipids - milk-fat - hypertension - women - association - calcium - mesa
Background Evidence regarding the role of dairy fat intake in cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been mixed and inconclusive. Most earlier studies have used self-reported measures of dietary intake and focused on relatively racially homogeneous populations. Circulating biomarkers of dairy fat in a multiethnic cohort provide objective measures of dairy fat intake and facilitate conclusions relevant to populations with different diets and susceptibility to CVD. Methods and Results In a multiethnic cohort of 2837 US adults aged 45 to 84 years at baseline (2000–2002), phospholipid fatty acids including 15:0, 14:0, and trans-16:1n7 were measured using standardized methods, and the incidence of CVD prospectively adjudicated. Self-reported whole-fat dairy and butter intakes had strongest associations with 15:0, rather than 14:0 or trans-16:1n7. In multivariate models including demographics and lifestyle and dietary habits, each SD-unit of 15:0 was associated with 19% lower CVD risk (hazard ratio [95% CI] 0.81 [0.68 to 0.98]) and 26% lower coronary heart disease (CHD) risk (0.74 [0.60 to 0.92]). Associations were strengthened after mutual adjustment for 14:0 and trans-16:1n-7 and were similar after adjustment for potential mediators. Plasma phospholipid 14:0 and trans-16:1n-7 were not significantly associated with incident CVD or CHD. All findings were similar in white, black, Hispanic, and Chinese American participants. Conclusion Plasma phospholipid 15:0, a biomarker of dairy fat, was inversely associated with incident CVD and CHD, while no association was found with phospholipid 14:0 and trans-16:1n-7. These findings support the need for further investigation of CVD effects of dairy fat, dairy-specific fatty acids, and dairy products in general
Dietary intake of saturated fat by food source and incident cardiovascular disease: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis
Oliveira Otto, M.C. de; Mozaffarian, D. ; Kromhout, D. ; Bertoni, A.G. ; Sibley, C.T. ; Jacobs, D.R. ; Nettleton, J.A. - \ 2012
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 96 (2012)2. - ISSN 0002-9165 - p. 397 - 404.
coronary-heart-disease - blood-pressure - risk-factors - womens health - cholesterol - consumption - mesa - hypertension - metaanalysis - patterns
Background: Although dietary recommendations have focused on restricting saturated fat (SF) consumption to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, evidence from prospective studies has not supported a strong link between total SF intake and CVD events. An understanding of whether food sources of SF influence these relations may provide new insights. Objective: We investigated the association of SF consumption from different food sources and the incidence of CVD events in a multi-ethnic population. Design: Participants who were 45-84 y old at baseline (n = 5209) were followed from 2000 to 2010. Diet was assessed by using a 120-item food-frequency questionnaire. CVD incidence (316 cases) was assessed during follow-up visits. Results: After adjustment for demographics, lifestyle, and dietary confounders, a higher intake of dairy SF was associated with lower CVD risk [HR (95% CI) for +5 g/d and +5% of energy from dairy SF: 0.79 (0.68, 0.92) and 0.62 (0.47, 0.82), respectively]. In contrast, a higher intake of meat SF was associated with greater CVD risk [HR (95% CI) for +5 g/d and a +5% of energy from meat SF: 1.26 (1.02, 1.54) and 1.48 (0.98, 2.23), respectively]. The substitution of 2% of energy from meat SF with energy from dairy SF was associated with a 25% lower CVD risk [HR (95% CI): 0.75 (0.63, 0.91)]. No associations were observed between plant or butter SF and CVD risk, but ranges of intakes were narrow. Conclusion: Associations of SF with health may depend on food-specific fatty acids or other nutrient constituents in foods that contain SF, in addition to SF. Am J Clin Nutr 2012;96:397-404.
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