Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Fibrillar structures in mixed systems
Peng, Jinfeng - \ 2016
University. Promotor(en): Erik van der Linden, co-promotor(en): Paul Venema; K.P. Velikov. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789462578265 - 284
cellulose - bacteria - fibres - protein isolates - whey - mixtures - emulsions - mechanical properties - bacteriën - vezels - eiwitisolaten - wei - mengsels - emulsies - mechanische eigenschappen

Fibrillar structures are important structuring elements for food products. Understanding the behaviour of fibrillar structures in complex food systems is essential for successful industrial applications. This thesis presents the behaviour of two different fibrillar structures, i.e. whey protein isolate (WPI) fibrils and bacterial cellulose (BC) microfibrils in mixtures under various conditions. The WPI fibrils are prepared from WPI and the BC microfibrils are extracted from commercial available ‘Nata de Coco’ by high-energy de-agglomeration. In Chapter 1, a general introduction is given, where we introduce two different fibrillar structures that were studied in this thesis. Also, the aim and the outline of the thesis are presented. In Chapter 2, 3, 4 and 5, the behaviour of mixtures containing WPI and BC microfibrils under different conditions are investigated. By varying the concentration ratios, pH, NaCl concentration and further applying heating treatment, their physico-chemical properties in mixed solutions, mixed solutions after heating and further heat-induced mixed gels are investigated and characterized at both pH 2 and pH 7. In general, both mixing WPI and BC microfibrils without heating and subsequently applying heating treatment lead to stable and homogeneous mixtures at pH 7, as long as BC microfibril concentration is above a critical value. Microscopic images showed that the WPI aggregates and BC microfibrils co-existed in the system. WPI denatured and aggregated in the mixture in the same way as when it is heated alone. Upon gelation, the WPI and BC microfibrils form a duplex gel consisting of two independent and homogeneous networks spanning the whole system. At pH 2, the WPI and BC microfibrils also form stable and homogeneous mixtures in the liquid state, both before and after heating. Microscopic images showed two fibrillar structures that are uniformly and independently present. Upon gelation at higher WPI concentration, a bi-fibrillar gel is formed consisting of a WPI fibrilllar gel and BC microfibrillar gel that co-exist. In Chapter 6 and 7, the behaviour of WPI fibrils at pH 2 in dispersions containing spheres, i.e. emulsions and polystyrene latex dispersions are studied. When WPI and spheres are both positively charged (i.e. WPI-stabilized emulsion), we observed depletion flocculation and depletion stabilization when the WPI fibril concentration increases. When WPI and the spheres are oppositely charged (i.e. polystyrene latex dispersions), bridging flocculation and steric/electrostatic stabilization were observed at low WPI fibril concentration, followed by depletion flocculation and depletion stabilization upon increasing WPI fibril concentrations. In Chapter 8 the stability of emulsions at pH 2 in the presence of only BC microfibrils and in the presence of both BC microfibrils and WPI fibrils was studied. When only BC microfibrils added at a sufficiently high concentration, the emulsions are stabilized by the presence of a yield stress as generated by the BC network. When both WPI fibrils and BC microfibrils are added to the emulsions, the networks they form behave in the same way, as when they are added to the emulsions separately. The WPI fibrils induced depletion flocculation and stabilization of the emulsions, despite the presence of the BC microfibrils. However, at high enough BC microfibril concentrations, the emulsions can be stabilized against depletion flocculation as induced by the WPI fibrils. The competition between stabilization and/or de-stabilization induced by the BC microfibrils and the WPI fibrils can lead to emulsions with different microstructures and rheological properties. A general discussion on the results obtained in this thesis is presented in Chapter 9, which includes recommendations for further research and concluding remarks.

Functionality-driven fractionation of lupin seeds
Berghout, J.A.M. - \ 2015
University. Promotor(en): Remko Boom, co-promotor(en): Atze Jan van der Goot. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789462572287 - 165
lupinen - eiwitisolaten - fractionering - scheiding - mechanische eigenschappen - voedselproducten - lupins - protein isolates - fractionation - separation - mechanical properties - food products
Functionality-driven fractionation of lupin seeds

The growth in the world population requires an increase in the production of protein-rich foods from plant-based materials. Lupin seeds have potential to become a novel plant protein source for food products because they are rich in protein (about 37 wt%) and they can be grown in moderate temperature climates as in north-western Europe. Besides a high protein content, lupin seeds are rich in dietary fibres (soluble and insoluble), contain about 7-10 wt% oil, and are low in starch. To optimally use the proteins present in lupin, a fractionation process has to be developed. For other legumes, refining of protein is usually performed through wet fractionation techniques. However, wet fractionation methods are resource-intensive, as a result of which the potential reduction in environmental impact when using plant-based materials for foods decreases.

The aim of this thesis is to obtain understanding of the production of functional, protein-rich material from lupin seeds in a more efficient manner. In this thesis, it is shown that focus on functionality rather than purity can lead to simplified fractionation processes, which is a concept referred to as functionality-driven fractionation (Figure 1). The influence of these simplifications on protein functionality and on physical and chemical stability of the protein isolates was explored. Furthermore, we performed a sustainability assessment of fractionation processes, from which we concluded that focus on a dry product with high purity has a large impact on energy use. In case of lupin, avoiding the oil extraction step as well as the drying step could lead to large gains in sustainability.

Figure 1 Upper scheme: conventional ingredient production and product processing route, focusing on protein and yield. Lower scheme: novel approach, focusing on functionality and sustainability.

The results presented in this thesis provide steps towards more sustainable production of functional fractions for food applications obtained with simplified fractionation processes. This work provides future perspectives for functionality-driven fractionation processes that may be extended to other legumes and pulses as well. This approach leads to the development of ingredients and fractions of seeds and legumes that can be used for plant-based food products.

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