Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

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Evolution of Hyaloperonospora effectors: ATR1 effector homologs from sister species of the downy mildew pathogen H. arabidopsidis are not recognised by RPP1WsB
Solovyeva, I. ; Schmuker, A. ; Cano, L.M. ; Damme, M. van; Ploch, S. ; Kamoun, S. ; Thines, M. - \ 2015
Mycological Progress 14 (2015). - ISSN 1617-416X - 9 p.
plant immune-system - phylogenetic-relationships - peronospora-parasitica - oomycete effector - resistance gene - proteins - sequences - thaliana - reveals - plasmopara
Like other plant-pathogenic oomycetes, downy mildew species of the genus Hyaloperonospora manipulate their hosts by secreting effector proteins. Despite intense research efforts devoted to deciphering the virulence and avirulence activities of effectors in the H. arabidopsidis/Arabidopsis thaliana pathosystem, there is only a single study in this pathosystem on the variation of effectors and resistance genes in natural populations, and the evolution of these effectors in the context of pathogen evolution is studied even less. In this work, the identification of A rabidopsis t haliana recognised (ATR)1-homologs is reported in two sister species of H. arabidopsidis, H. thlaspeos-perfoliati, and H. crispula, which are specialized on the host plants Microthlaspi perfoliatum and Reseda lutea, respectively. ATR1-diversity within these sister species of H. arabidopsidis was evaluated, and the ATR1-homologs from different isolates of H. thlaspeos-perfoliati and H. crispula were tested to see if they would be recognised by the previously characterised RPP1-WsB protein from A. thaliana. None of the effectors from the sister species was recognised, suggesting that due to the adaptation to altered or new targets after a host jump, features of variable effectors might vary to a degree that recognition of orthologous Avr-causing effectors is no longer effective and probably does not contribute to non-host immunity.
Distributions, ex situ conservation priorities, and genetic resource potential of crop wild relatives of sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam., I. series Batatas]
Khoury, C.K. ; Heider, B. ; Castaneda-Alvarez, N.P. ; Achicanoy, H.A. ; Sosa, C.C. ; Miller, R.E. ; Scotland, R.W. ; Wood, J.R.I. ; Rossel, G. ; Eserman, L.A. ; Jarret, R.L. ; Yencho, G.C. ; Bernau, V. ; Juarez, H. ; Sotelo, S. ; Haan, S. de; Struik, P.C. - \ 2015
Frontiers in Plant Science 6 (2015). - ISSN 1664-462X - 14 p.
species distribution models - phylogenetic-relationships - beta-carotene - convolvulaceae - sequences - diversity - evolution - bias - challenges - tolerance
Crop wild relatives of sweetpotato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam., I. series Batatas] have the potential to contribute to breeding objectives for this important root crop. Uncertainty in regard to species boundaries and their phylogenetic relationships, the limited availability of germplasm with which to perform crosses, and the difficulty of introgression of genes from wild species has constrained their utilization. Here, we compile geographic occurrence data on relevant sweetpotato wild relatives and produce potential distribution models for the species. We then assess the comprehensiveness of ex situ germplasm collections, contextualize these results with research and breeding priorities, and use ecogeographic information to identify species with the potential to contribute desirable agronomic traits. The fourteen species that are considered the closest wild relatives of sweetpotato generally occur from the central United States to Argentina, with richness concentrated in Mesoamerica and in the extreme Southeastern United States. Currently designated species differ among themselves and in comparison to the crop in their adaptations to temperature, precipitation, and edaphic characteristics and most species also show considerable intraspecific variation. With 79% of species identified as high priority for further collecting, we find that these crop genetic resources are highly under-represented in ex situ conservation systems and thus their availability to breeders and researchers is inadequate. We prioritize taxa and specific geographic locations for further collecting in order to improve the completeness of germplasm collections. In concert with enhanced conservation of sweetpotato wild relatives, further taxonomic research, characterization and evaluation of germplasm, and improving the techniques to overcome barriers to introgression with wild species are needed in order to mobilize these genetic resources for crop breeding.
Using RNA-Seq to assemble a rose transcriptome with more than 13,000 full-length expressed genes and to develop the WagRhSNP 68k Axiom SNP array for rose (Rosa L.)
Koning, C.F.S. ; Esselink, G. ; Vukosavljev, M. ; Westende, W.P.C. van 't; Gitonga, V.W. ; Krens, F.A. ; Voorrips, R.E. ; Weg, W.E. van de; Schulz, D. ; Debener, T. ; Maliepaard, C.A. ; Arens, P.F.P. ; Smulders, M.J.M. - \ 2015
Frontiers in Plant Science 6 (2015). - ISSN 1664-462X - 10 p.
powdery mildew - markers - tool - identification - resistance - genome - diversity - sequences - platform - plant
In order to develop a versatile and large SNP array for rose, we set out to mine ESTs from diverse sets of rose germplasm. For this RNA-Seq libraries containing about 700 million reads were generated from tetraploid cut and garden roses using Illumina paired-end sequencing, and from diploid Rosa multiflora using 454 sequencing. Separate de novo assemblies were performed in order to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within and between rose varieties. SNPs among tetraploid roses were selected for constructing a genotyping array that can be employed for genetic mapping and marker-trait association discovery in breeding programs based on tetraploid germplasm, both from cut roses and from garden roses. In total 68,893 SNPs were included on the WagRhSNP Axiom array. Next, an orthology-guided assembly was performed for the construction of a non-redundant rose transcriptome database. A total of 21,740 transcripts had significant hits with orthologous genes in the strawberry (Fragaria vesca L.) genome. Of these 13,390 appeared to contain the full-length coding regions. This newly established transcriptome resource adds considerably to the currently available sequence resources for the Rosaceae family in general and the genus Rosa in particular.
Composition and predicted functional ecology of mussel - associated bacteria in Indonesian marine lakes
Cleary, D.F.R. ; Becking, L.E. ; Polonia, A. ; Freitas, R.M. ; Gomes, N. - \ 2015
Antonie van Leeuwenhoek: : Nederlandsch tijdschrift voor hygiëne, microbiologie en serologie 107 (2015)3. - ISSN 0003-6072 - p. 821 - 834.
microbial communities - brachidontes-exustus - scorched mussel - species complex - mytilidae - bivalvia - mycoplasma - diversity - islands - sequences
In the present study, we sampled bacterial communities associated with mussels inhabiting two distinct coastal marine ecosystems in Kalimantan, Indonesia, namely, marine lakes and coastal mangroves. We used 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing and predicted metagenomic analysis to compare microbial composition and function. Marine lakes are small landlocked bodies of seawater isolated to varying degrees from the open sea environment. They contain numerous endemic taxa and represent natural laboratories of speciation. Our primary goals were to (1) use BLAST search to identify closely related organisms to dominant bacterial OTUs in our mussel dataset and (2) to compare bacterial communities and enrichment in the predicted bacterial metagenome among lakes. Our sequencing effort yielded 3553 OTUs belonging to 44 phyla, 99 classes and 121 orders. Mussels in the largest marine lake (Kakaban) and the coastal mangrove habitat were dominated by bacteria belonging to the phylum Proteobacteria whereas smaller lakes, located on the island of Maratua, were dominated by bacteria belonging to the phyla Firmicutes and Tenericutes. The single most abundant OTU overall was assigned to the genus Mycoplasma. There were several significant differences among locations with respect to metabolic pathways. These included enrichment of xenobiotic biodegradation pathways in the largest marine lake and coastal mangrove. These locations were also the most enriched with respect to nitrogen metabolism. The presence of genes related to isoquinoline alkaloids, polyketides, hydrolases, mono and dioxygenases in the predicted analysis of functional pathways is an indication that the bacterial communities of Brachidontes mussels may be potentially important sources of new marine medicines and enzymes of industrial interest. Future work should focus on measuring how mussel microbial communities influence nutrient dynamics within the marine lake environment and isolating microbes with potential biotechnological applications.
Small Homologous Blocks in Phytophthora Genomes Do Not Point to an Ancient Whole-Genome Duplication
Hooff, J.J.E. van; Snel, B. ; Seidl, M.F. - \ 2014
Genome Biology and Evolution 6 (2014)5. - ISSN 1759-6653 - p. 1079 - 1085.
pathogen phytophthora - maximum-likelihood - evolution - genes - consequences - mechanisms - adaptation - repertoire - sequences - infestans
Genomes of the plant-pathogenic genus Phytophthora are characterized by small duplicated blocks consisting of two consecutive genes (2HOM blocks) and by an elevated abundance of similarly aged gene duplicates. Both properties, in particular the presence of 2HOM blocks, have been attributed to a whole-genome duplication (WGD) at the last common ancestor of Phytophthora. However, large intraspecies synteny-compelling evidence for a WGD-has not been detected. Here, we revisited the WGD hypothesis by deducing the age of 2HOM blocks. Two independent timing methods reveal that the majority of 2HOM blocks arose after divergence of the Phytophthora lineages. In addition, a large proportion of the 2HOM block copies colocalize on the same scaffold. Therefore, the presence of 2HOM blocks does not support a WGD at the last common ancestor of Phytophthora. Thus, genome evolution of Phytophthora is likely driven by alternative mechanisms, such as bursts of transposon activity.
The Colletotrichum gigasporum species complex
Liu, F. ; Cai, L. ; Crous, P.W. ; Damm, U. - \ 2014
Persoonia 33 (2014). - ISSN 0031-5850 - p. 83 - 97.
sp-nov - primer sets - endophytes - pathogens - china - gloeosporioides - anthracnose - diversity - sequences - acutatum
In a preliminary analysis, 21 Colletotrichum strains with large conidia preserved in the CBS culture collection clustered with a recently described species, C. gigasporum, forming a clade distinct from other currently known Colletotrichum species complexes. Multi-locus phylogenetic analyses (ITS, ACT, TUB2, CHS-1, GAPDH) as well as each of the single-locus analyses resolved seven distinct species, one of them being C. gigasporum. Colletotrichum gigasporum and its close allies thus constitute a previously unknown species complex with shared morphological features. Five of the seven species accepted in the C. gigasporum species complex are described here as novel species, namely C. arxii, C. magnisporum, C. pseudomajus, C. radicis and C. vietnamense. A species represented by a single sterile strain, namely CBS 159.50, was not described as novel species, and is treated as Colletotrichum sp. CBS 159.50. Furthermore, C. thailandicum is reduced to synonymy with C. gigasporum.
Polycistronic expression of a ß-carotene biosynthetic pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae coupled to ß-ionone production
Beekwilder, J. ; Rossum, H.M. ; Koopman, F. ; Sonntag, F. ; Buchhaupt, M. ; Schrader, J. ; Hall, R.D. ; Bosch, H.J. ; Pronk, J.T. ; Maris, A.J.A. van; Daran, J.M. - \ 2014
Journal of Biotechnology 192 (2014)partB. - ISSN 0168-1656 - p. 383 - 392.
cleavage dioxygenase - yeast - genes - sequences - transformation - translation - polyprotein - versatile - genome - strain
The flavour and fragrance compound ß-ionone, which naturally occurs in raspberry and many other fruits and flowers, is currently produced by synthetic chemistry. This study describes a synthetic biology approach for ß-ionone production from glucose by Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is partially based on polycistronic expression. Experiments with model proteins showed that the T2A sequence of the Thosea asigna virus mediated efficient production of individual proteins from a single transcript in S. cerevisiae. Subsequently, three ß-carotene biosynthesis genes from the carotenoid-producing ascomycete Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous (crtI, crtE and crtYB) were expressed in S. cerevisiae from a single polycistronic construct. In this construct, the individual crt proteins were separated by T2A sequences. Production of the individual proteins from the polycistronic construct was confirmed by Western blot analysis and by measuring the production of ß-carotene. To enable ß-ionone production, a carotenoid-cleavage dioxygenase from raspberry (RiCCD1) was co-expressed in the ß-carotene producing strain. In glucose-grown cultures with a second phase of dodecane, ß-ionone and geranylacetone accumulated in the organic phase. Thus, by introducing a polycistronic construct encoding a fungal carotenoid pathway and an expression cassette encoding a plant dioxygenase, a novel microbial production system has been established for a fruit flavour compound.
Dynamics of the Microbiota in Response to Host Infection
Belzer, C. ; Gerber, G.K. ; Roeselers, G. ; Delaney, M. ; DuBois, A. ; Liu, Q. ; Belavusava, V. ; Yeliseyev, V. ; Houseman, A. ; Onderdonk, A. ; Cavanaugh, C. ; Bry, L. - \ 2014
PLoS One 9 (2014)7. - ISSN 1932-6203
citrobacter-rodentium infection - gene-expression data - mucosal infection - gut microbiome - mice - inflammation - diversity - sequences - pathogen - colitis
Longitudinal studies of the microbiota are important for discovering changes in microbial communities that affect the host. The complexity of these ecosystems requires rigorous integrated experimental and computational methods to identify temporal signatures that promote physiologic or pathophysiologic responses in vivo. Employing a murine model of infectious colitis with the pathogen Citrobacter rodentium, we generated a 2-month time-series of 16S rDNA gene profiles, and quantitatively cultured commensals, from multiple intestinal sites in infected and uninfected mice. We developed a computational framework to discover time-varying signatures for individual taxa, and to automatically group signatures to identify microbial sub-communities within the larger gut ecosystem that demonstrate common behaviors. Application of this model to the 16S rDNA dataset revealed dynamic alterations in the microbiota at multiple levels of resolution, from effects on systems-level metrics to changes across anatomic sites for individual taxa and species. These analyses revealed unique, time-dependent microbial signatures associated with host responses at different stages of colitis. Signatures included a Mucispirillum OTU associated with early disruption of the colonic surface mucus layer, prior to the onset of symptomatic colitis, and members of the Clostridiales and Lactobacillales that increased with successful resolution of inflammation, after clearance of the pathogen. Quantitative culture data validated findings for predominant species, further refining and strengthening model predictions. These findings provide new insights into the complex behaviors found within host ecosystems, and define several time-dependent microbial signatures that may be leveraged in studies of other infectious or inflammatory conditions.
Binning metagenomic contigs by coverage and composition
Alneberg, J. ; Bjarnason, B.S. ; Bruijn, I. de; Schirmer, M. ; Quick, J. ; Ijaz, U.Z. ; Lahti, L.M. ; Loman, N.J. ; Andersson, A.F. ; Quince, C. - \ 2014
Nature Methods : techniques for life scientists and chemists 11 (2014). - ISSN 1548-7091 - p. 1144 - 1146.
sequences - genomes
Shotgun sequencing enables the reconstruction of genomes from complex microbial communities, but because assembly does not reconstruct entire genomes, it is necessary to bin genome fragments. Here we present CONCOCT, a new algorithm that combines sequence composition and coverage across multiple samples, to automatically cluster contigs into genomes. We demonstrate high recall and precision on artificial as well as real human gut metagenome data sets.
An integrated catalog of reference genes in the human gut microbiome
Li, J. ; Jia, H. ; Cai, X. ; Zhong, H. ; Feng, Q. ; Sunagawa, S. ; Arumugam, M. ; Kultima, J.R. ; Prifti, E. ; Nielsen, T. ; Juncker, A.S. ; Manichanh, C. ; Chen, B. ; Zhang, W. ; Levenez, F. ; Xu, X. ; Xiao, L. ; Liang, S. ; Zhang, D. ; Zhang, Z. ; Chen, W. ; Zhao, H. ; Al-Aama, J.Y. ; Edris, S. ; Yang, H. ; Hansen, H. ; Nielsen, H.B. ; Brunak, S. ; Kristiansen, K. ; Guarner, F. ; Pedersen, O. ; Doré, J. ; Ehrlich, S.D. ; Bork, P. ; Wang, J. ; Vos, W.M. de; Tims, S. ; Zoetendal, E.G. ; Kleerebezem, M. - \ 2014
Nature Biotechnology 32 (2014)8. - ISSN 1087-0156 - p. 834 - 841.
eukaryotic diversity - fecal microbiota - population-size - metagenome - sequences - genomes - tool - alignment - impact - twins
Many analyses of the human gut microbiome depend on a catalog of reference genes. Existing catalogs for the human gut microbiome are based on samples from single cohorts or on reference genomes or protein sequences, which limits coverage of global microbiome diversity. Here we combined 249 newly sequenced samples of the Metagenomics of the Human Intestinal Tract (MetaHit) project with 1,018 previously sequenced samples to create a cohort from three continents that is at least threefold larger than cohorts used for previous gene catalogs. From this we established the integrated gene catalog (IGC) comprising 9,879,896 genes. The catalog includes close-to-complete sets of genes for most gut microbes, which are also of considerably higher quality than in previous catalogs. Analyses of a group of samples from Chinese and Danish individuals using the catalog revealed country-specific gut microbial signatures. This expanded catalog should facilitate quantitative characterization of metagenomic, metatranscriptomic and metaproteomic data from the gut microbiome to understand its variation across populations in human health and disease.
BioHackathon series in 2011 and 2012: penetration of ontology and linked data in life science domains
Katayama, T. ; Wilkinson, M.D. ; Aoki-Kinoshita, K.F. ; Prins, J.C.P. - \ 2014
Journal of Biomedical Semantics 5 (2014). - ISSN 2041-1480
genome analysis environment - metabolic pathways - web services - gene - sequences - software - biology - normalization - collection - glycomics
The application of semantic technologies to the integration of biological data and the interoperability of bioinformatics analysis and visualization tools has been the common theme of a series of annual BioHackathons hosted in Japan for the past five years. Here we provide a review of the activities and outcomes from the BioHackathons held in 2011 in Kyoto and 2012 in Toyama. In order to efficiently implement semantic technologies in the life sciences, participants formed various sub-groups and worked on the following topics: Resource Description Framework (RDF) models for specific domains, text mining of the literature, ontology development, essential metadata for biological databases, platforms to enable efficient Semantic Web technology development and interoperability, and the development of applications for Semantic Web data. In this review, we briefly introduce the themes covered by these sub-groups. The observations made, conclusions drawn, and software development projects that emerged from these activities are discussed.
Identification and assembly of genomes and genetic elements in complex metagenomic samples without using reference genomes
Nielsen, H.B. ; Almeida, M. ; Sierakowska Juncker, A. ; Rasmussen, S. ; Li, J. ; Sunagawa, S. ; Plichta, D.R. ; Gautier, L. ; Pedersen, A.G. ; Chatelier, E. Le; Pelletier, E. ; Bonde, I. ; Nielsen, T. ; Manichanh, C. ; Arumugam, M. ; Batto, J.M. ; Quintanilha dos Santos, M.B. ; Blom, N. ; Borruel, N. ; Burgdorf, K.S. ; Boumezbeur, F. ; Casellas, F. ; Doré, J. ; Dworzynski, P. ; Guarner, F. ; Hansen, T. ; Hildebrand, F. ; Kaas, R.S. ; Kennedy, S. ; Kristiansen, K. ; Kultima, J.R. ; Leonard, P. ; Levenez, F. ; Lund, O. ; Moumen, B. ; Paslier, D. Le; Pons, N. ; Pedersen, O. ; Prifti, E. ; Qin, J. ; Raes, J. ; Sørensen, S. ; Tap, J. ; Tims, S. ; Ussery, D.W. ; Yamada, T. ; Jamet, A. ; Mérieux, A. ; Cultrone, A. ; Torrejon, A. ; Quinquis, B. ; Brechot, C. ; Delorme, C. ; M'Rini, C. ; Vos, W.M. de; Maguin, E. ; Varela, E. ; Guedon, E. ; Gwen, F. ; Haimet, F. ; Artiguenave, F. ; Vandemeulebrouck, G. ; Denariaz, G. ; Khaci, G. ; Blottière, H. ; Knol, J. ; Weissenbach, J. ; Hylckama Vlieg, J.E. van; Torben, J. ; Parkhil, J. ; Turner, K. ; Guchte, M. van de; Antolin, M. ; Rescigno, M. ; Kleerebezem, M. ; Derrien, M. ; Galleron, N. ; Sanchez, N. ; Grarup, N. ; Veiga, P. ; Oozeer, R. ; Dervyn, R. ; Layec, S. ; Bruls, T. ; Winogradski, Y. ; Zoetendal, E.G. ; Renault, D. ; Sicheritz-Ponten, ; Bork, P. ; Wang, J. ; Brunak, S. ; Ehrlich, S.D. - \ 2014
Nature Biotechnology 32 (2014). - ISSN 1087-0156 - p. 822 - 828.
short read alignment - sequences - systems - algorithms - microbiota - protein - life - sets - tree - tool
Most current approaches for analyzing metagenomic data rely on comparisons to reference genomes, but the microbial diversity of many environments extends far beyond what is covered by reference databases. De novo segregation of complex metagenomic data into specific biological entities, such as particular bacterial strains or viruses, remains a largely unsolved problem. Here we present a method, based on binning co-abundant genes across a series of metagenomic samples, that enables comprehensive discovery of new microbial organisms, viruses and co-inherited genetic entities and aids assembly of microbial genomes without the need for reference sequences. We demonstrate the method on data from 396 human gut microbiome samples and identify 7,381 co-abundance gene groups (CAGs), including 741 metagenomic species (MGS). We use these to assemble 238 high-quality microbial genomes and identify affiliations between MGS and hundreds of viruses or genetic entities. Our method provides the means for comprehensive profiling of the diversity within complex metagenomic samples.
Introducing Chaetothyriothecium, a new genus of Microthyriales
Hongsanan, S. ; Chomnunti, P. ; Crous, P.W. ; Chukeatirote, E. ; Hyde, K.D. - \ 2014
Phytotaxa 161 (2014)2. - ISSN 1179-3155 - p. 157 - 164.
probability - sequences - bootstrap - inference - alignment - genera - trees - tools
The order Microthyriales comprises foliar biotrophs, epiphytes, pathogens or saprobes that occur on plant leaves and stems. The order is relatively poorly known due to limited sampling and few in-depth studies. There is also a lack of phylogenetic data for these fungi, which form small black spots on plant host surfaces, but rarely cause any damage to the host. A "Microthyriaceae"-like fungus collected in central Thailand is described as a new genus, Chaetothyriothecium (type species Chaetothyriothecium elegans sp. nov.). Phylogenetic analyses of LSU gene data showed this species to cluster with other members of Microthyriales, where it is related to Microthyrium microscopicum the type of the order. The description of the new species is supplemented by DNA sequence data, which resolves its placement in the order. Little molecular data is available for this order, stressing the need for further collections and molecular data.
New insights into domestication of carrot from root transcriptome analyses
Rong, J. ; Lammers, Y. ; Strasburg, J.L. ; Schidlo, N.S. ; Ariyurek, Y. ; Jong, T.J. de; Klinkhamer, P.G.L. ; Smulders, M.J.M. ; Vrieling, K. - \ 2014
BMC Genomics 15 (2014). - ISSN 1471-2164 - 15 p.
daucus-carota l. - nucleotide polymorphism - wild - populations - inference - sativus - genome - diversity - sequences - selection
Background - Understanding the molecular basis of domestication can provide insights into the processes of rapid evolution and crop improvement. Here we demonstrated the processes of carrot domestication and identified genes under selection based on transcriptome analyses. Results - The root transcriptomes of widely differing cultivated and wild carrots were sequenced. A method accounting for sequencing errors was introduced to optimize SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) discovery. 11,369 SNPs were identified. Of these, 622 (out of 1000 tested SNPs) were validated and used to genotype a large set of cultivated carrot, wild carrot and other wild Daucus carota subspecies, primarily of European origin. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that eastern carrot may originate from Western Asia and western carrot may be selected from eastern carrot. Different wild D. carota subspecies may have contributed to the domestication of cultivated carrot. Genetic diversity was significantly reduced in western cultivars, probably through bottlenecks and selection. However, a high proportion of genetic diversity (more than 85% of the genetic diversity in wild populations) is currently retained in western cultivars. Model simulation indicated high and asymmetric gene flow from wild to cultivated carrots, spontaneously and/or by introgression breeding. Nevertheless, high genetic differentiation exists between cultivated and wild carrots (Fst =0.295) showing the strong effects of selection. Expression patterns differed radically for some genes between cultivated and wild carrot roots which may be related to changes in root traits. The up-regulation of water-channel-protein gene expression in cultivars might be involved in changing water content and transport in roots. The activated expression of carotenoid-binding-protein genes in cultivars could be related to the high carotenoid accumulation in roots. The silencing of allergen-protein-like genes in cultivated carrot roots suggested strong human selection to reduce allergy. These results suggest that regulatory changes of gene expressions may have played a predominant role in domestication. Conclusions - Western carrots may originate from eastern carrots. The reduction in genetic diversity in western cultivars due to domestication bottleneck/selection may have been offset by introgression from wild carrot. Differential gene expression patterns between cultivated and wild carrot roots may be a signature of strong selection for favorable cultivation traits.
Ercella succinigenes gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic succinate-producing bacterium
Gelder, A.H. van; Sousa, D.Z. ; Rijpstra, W.I. ; Damsté, J.S. ; Stams, A.J.M. ; Sanchez Andrea, I. - \ 2014
International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology 64 (2014)7. - ISSN 1466-5026 - p. 2449 - 2454.
ribosomal-rna genes - acid - heterogeneity - fermentation - sequences - biofuels - glycerol - industry - operons - genomes
A novel anaerobic succinate-producing bacterium, strain ZWBT, was isolated from sludge collected from a biogas desulfurization bioreactor (Eerbeek, the Netherlands). Cells were non-spore-forming, motile, slightly curved rods (0.4–0.5 µm in diameter and 2–3 µm in length), and stained Gram-negative. The temperature range for growth was 25–40 °C, with an optimum at 37 °C. The pH range for growth was 7.0–9.0, with an optimum at pH 7.5. Strain ZWBT was able to ferment glycerol and several carbohydrates mainly to H2, succinate and acetate. Sulfur and fumarate could be used as electron acceptors by strain ZWBT. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 37.6 mol%. The most abundant fatty acids were iso-C14¿:¿0 and iso-C16¿:¿0 DMA. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain ZWBT belongs to the family Ruminococcaceae and it is distantly related to Saccharofermentans acetigenes JCM 14006T (92.1¿%). Based on the physiological features and phylogenetic analysis, strain ZWBT represents a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Ercella succinigenes gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Ercella succinigenes is ZWBT (¿=¿DSM 27333T¿=¿JCM 19283T).
Effects of selective digestive decontamination (SDD) on the gut resistome
Buelow, E. ; Bello Gonzalez, T.D.G. ; Versluis, D. ; Oostdijk, E.A.N. ; Ogilvie, L.A. ; Mourik, M.S.M. van; Oosterink, L. ; Passel, M.W.J. van; Smidt, H. ; D’Andrea, M.M. ; Been, M. de; Jones, B.V. ; Willems, R.J.L. ; Bonten, M.J.M. ; Schaik, W. - \ 2014
Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy 69 (2014)8. - ISSN 0305-7453 - p. 2215 - 2223.
intensive-care units - antimicrobial resistance - microbiota - tract - microarray - metagenome - sequences - bacterial - classification - generation
Objectives Selective digestive decontamination (SDD) is an infection prevention measure for critically ill patients in intensive care units (ICUs) that aims to eradicate opportunistic pathogens from the oropharynx and intestines, while sparing the anaerobic flora, by the application of non-absorbable antibiotics. Selection for antibiotic-resistant bacteria is still a major concern for SDD. We therefore studied the impact of SDD on the reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes (i.e. the resistome) by culture-independent approaches. Methods We evaluated the impact of SDD on the gut microbiota and resistome in a single ICU patient during and after an ICU stay by several metagenomic approaches. We also determined by quantitative PCR the relative abundance of two common aminoglycoside resistance genes in longitudinally collected samples from 12 additional ICU patients who received SDD. Results The patient microbiota was highly dynamic during the hospital stay. The abundance of antibiotic resistance genes more than doubled during SDD use, mainly due to a 6.7-fold increase in aminoglycoside resistance genes, in particular aph(2¿)-Ib and an aadE-like gene. We show that aph(2¿)-Ib is harboured by anaerobic gut commensals and is associated with mobile genetic elements. In longitudinal samples of 12 ICU patients, the dynamics of these two genes ranged from a ~104 fold increase to a ~10-10 fold decrease in relative abundance during SDD. Conclusions ICU hospitalization and the simultaneous application of SDD has large, but highly individualized, effects on the gut resistome of ICU patients. Selection for transferable antibiotic resistance genes in anaerobic commensal bacteria could impact the risk of transfer of antibiotic resistance genes to opportunistic pathogens.
Development and Validation of a Genotype 3 Recombinant Protein based Immunoassay for Hepatitis E Virus Serology in Swine
Poel, W.H.M. van der; Pavio, N. ; Goot, J. van der; Es, M. van; Martin, M. ; Engel, B. - \ 2014
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research 47 (2014)4. - ISSN 0100-879X - p. 334 - 339.
sequences - zoonosis
Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is classified within the family Hepeviridae, genus Hepevirus. HEV genotype 3 (Gt3) infections are endemic in pigs in Western Europe and in North and South America and cause zoonotic infections in humans. Several serological assays to detect HEV antibodies in pigs have been developed, at first mainly based on HEV genotype 1 (Gt1) antigens. To develop a sensitive HEV Gt3 ELISA, a recombinant baculovirus expression product of HEV Gt3 open reading frame-2 was produced and coated onto polystyrene ELISA plates. After incubation of porcine sera, bound HEV antibodies were detected with anti-porcine anti-IgG and anti-IgM conjugates. For primary estimation of sensitivity and specificity of the assay, sets of sera were used from pigs experimentally infected with HEV Gt3. For further validation of the assay and to set the cutoff value, a batch of 1100 pig sera was used. All pig sera were tested using the developed HEV Gt3 assay and two other serologic assays based on HEV Gt1 antigens. Since there is no gold standard available for HEV antibody testing, further validation and a definite setting of the cutoff of the developed HEV Gt3 assay were performed using a statistical approach based on Bayes' theorem. The developed and validated HEV antibody assay showed effective detection of HEV-specific antibodies. This assay can contribute to an improved detection of HEV antibodies and enable more reliable estimates of the prevalence of HEV Gt3 in swine in different regions.
Comparison of two short DNA barcoding loci (COI and COII) and two longer ribosomal DNA genes (SSU & LSU rRNA) for specimen identification among quarantine root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) and their close relatives
Kiewnick, S. ; Holterman, M.H.M. ; Elsen, S.J.J. van den; Megen, H.H.B. van; Frey, J.E. ; Helder, J. - \ 2014
European Journal of Plant Pathology 140 (2014)1. - ISSN 0929-1873 - p. 97 - 110.
small-subunit rdna - molecular characterization - phylogenetic analysis - pellioditis-marina - globodera-pallida - complex nematoda - cyst nematodes - sequences - evolution - morphology
Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are important pests of numerous crops worldwide. Some members of this genus have a quarantine status, and accurate species identification is required to prevent further spreading. DNA barcoding is a method for organism identification in non-complex DNA backgrounds based on informative motifs in short DNA stretches (˜600 bp). As part of the EU 7th Framework project QBOL, 15 Meloidogyne species were chosen to compare the resolutions offered by two typical DNA barcoding loci, COI and COII, with the distinguishing signals produced by two ribosomal DNA genes (small and large subunit rDNA; SSU¿˜¿1,700 and LSU¿˜¿3,400 bp). None of the four markers distinguished between the tropical species Meloidogyne incognita, M. javanica and M. arenaria. Taking P ID (Liberal) values =0.93 as a measure for species delimitation, the four mtDNA and rDNA markers performed well for the tropical Meloidogyne species complex, M. enterolobii, M. hapla, and M. maritima. Within cluster III A (Holterman et al. Phytopathology, 99, 227–235, 2009), SSU rDNA did not offer resolution at species level. Both mtDNA loci COI and COII did, whereas for LSU rDNA a longer fragment (=700 bp) is required. The high level of mitochondrial heteroplasmy recently reported for M. chitwoodi (Humphreys-Pereira and Elling Nematology, 15, 315–327, 2013) was not found in the populations under investigation, suggesting this could be a regional phenomenon. For identification of RKNs, we suggest the combined use of SSU rDNA with one of three other markers presented here.
Towards a new classification system for legumes: Progress report from the 6th International Legume Conference
Pontes Coelho Borges, L.M. ; Bruneau, A. ; Cardoso, D. ; Crisp, M. ; Delgado-Salinas, A. ; Doyle, J.J. ; Egan, A. ; Herendeen, P.S. ; Hughes, C. ; Kenicer, G. ; Klitgaard, B. ; Koenen, E. ; Lavin, M. ; Lewis, G. ; Luckow, M. ; Mackinder, B. ; Malecot, V. ; Miller, J.T. ; Pennington, R.T. ; Queiroz, L.P. de; Schrire, B. ; Simon, M.F. ; Steele, K. ; Torke, B. ; Wieringa, J.J. ; Wojciechowski, M.F. ; Boatwright, S. ; Estrella, M. de la; Mansano, V.D. ; Prado, D.E. ; Stirton, C. ; Wink, M. - \ 2013
South African Journal of Botany 89 (2013). - ISSN 0254-6299 - p. 3 - 9.
caesalpinioid legumes - phylogeny - leguminosae - evolution - diversification - dipsacales - sequences - lineages - gene - rbcl
Legume systematists have been making great progress in understanding evolutionary relationships within the Leguminosae (Fabaceae), the third largest family of flowering plants. As the phylogenetic picture has become clearer, so too has the need for a revised classification of the family. The organization of the family into three subfamilies and 42 tribes is outdated and evolutionarily misleading. The three traditionally recognized subfamilies, Caesalpinioideae, Mimosoideae, and Papilionoideae, do not adequately represent relationships within the family. The occasion of the Sixth International Legume Conference in Johannesburg, South Africa in January 2013, with its theme "Towards a new classification system for legumes," provided the impetus to move forward with developing a new classification. A draft classification, based on current phylogenetic results and a set of principles and guidelines, was prepared in advance of the conference as the basis for discussion. The principles, guidelines, and draft classification were presented and debated at the conference. The objectives of the discussion were to develop consensus on the principles that should guide the development of the classification, to discuss the draft classification's strengths and weaknesses and make proposals for its revision, and identify and prioritize phylogenetic deficiencies that must be resolved before the classification could be published. This paper describes the collaborative process by a large group of legume systematists, publishing under the name Legume Phylogeny Working Group, to develop a new phylogenetic classification system for the Leguminosae. The goals of this paper are to inform the broader legume community, and others, of the need for a revised classification, and spell out clearly what the alternatives and challenges are for a new classification system for the family. (C) 2013 SAAB. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
The tropical African legume Scorodophloeus clade includes two undescribed Hymenostegia segregate genera and Micklethwaitia, a rare, monospecific genus from Mozambique.
Mackinder, B.A. ; Saslis-Lagoudakis, H. ; Wieringa, J.J. ; Devey, D. ; Forest, F. ; Bruneau, A. - \ 2013
South African Journal of Botany 89 (2013). - ISSN 0254-6299 - p. 156 - 163.
odd man - leguminosae - caesalpinioideae - detarieae - patterns - phylogeny - sequences - forests
Legume subfamily Caesalpinioideae accommodates approximately 2250 species in 171 genera which traditionally are placed in four tribes: Caesalpinieae, Cassieae, Cercideae and Detarieae. The monophyletic tribe Detarieae includes the Amherstieae subclade which contains about 55 genera. Our knowledge of the relationships among those genera is good in some cases but for many other genera phylogenetic relationships have been unclear. The non-monophyletic nature of at least two amherstioid genera, Cynometra and Hymenostegia has also complicated the picture. During the course of a multi-disciplinary study of Hymenostegia sensu lato, which includes phylogenetic analyses based on matK and trnL data, we have recovered the “Scorodophloeus clade”, an exclusively tropical African clade of four genera which includes the eponymous genus Scorodophloeus, two undescribed generic segregates of Hymenostegia sensu lato, and the previously unsampled rare monospecific genus Micklethwaitia from Mozambique. Zenkerella is suggested as a possible sister genus to the Scorodophloeus clade. A distribution map is presented of the seven species that belong to the Scorodophloeus clade.
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