Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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What influences mothers’ snack choices for their children aged 2–7?
Damen, Femke W.M. ; Luning, Pieternel A. ; Fogliano, Vincenzo ; Steenbekkers, Bea L.P.A. - \ 2019
Food Quality and Preference 74 (2019). - ISSN 0950-3293 - p. 10 - 20.
Child dietary behavior - Diary - First child - Food choice - Healthy snack - Maternal education

The increasing intake of energy dense snacks by children is one of the factors contributing to childhood overweight. Mothers are mainly responsible for the foods their young children consume. Therefore, this study aims to describe snack choices and the related considerations of mothers with young children in the home environment. The possibility that snack choices and considerations are related to maternal education, childbirth order, and age groups of the children was also investigated. A food and motivation diary study with 136 Dutch mothers of young children aged 2–7 years was conducted for 13 days. Mothers reported every snack they gave to their child. Fruits, cookies and candy were the most frequently provided snacks; healthiness of the snack and child preference were the most used considerations. Considerations were grouped in six overall categories: health-related, influence of the child, habit-related, strategies, external influence and other considerations. Higher educated mothers and mothers of first children showed more health-conscious behavior. Lower educated mothers more often justified their (unhealthy) snack choice. Next to insight into the number and type of snacks provided, the empirical findings in this study provide new understanding of the considerations of mothers while providing a snack to their young children.

Values and value conflicts in snack providing of Dutch, Polish, Indonesian and Italian mothers
Damen, Femke W.M. ; Hofstede, Gert Jan ; Steenbekkers, Bea L.P.A. ; Vitaglione, Paola ; Pellegrini, Nicoletta ; Fogliano, Vincenzo ; Luning, Pieternel A. - \ 2019
Food Research International 115 (2019). - ISSN 0963-9969 - p. 554 - 561.
Child - Childhood obesity - Children's dietary behavior - Cross-cultural differences - Culture - Food choice - Mother - National culture

This study investigates which values play a role in the decision of mothers about snacks to offer to their young children with a focus on the value conflicts that might occur. The study explores whether national culture is reflected in mothers' values in snack choice for their young children and the related value conflicts. Semi-structured interviews with 67 mothers of 2–7 years old children divided over 4 national cultures (Dutch, Polish, Indonesian and Italian) were conducted. Questions were asked about their values and value conflicts when providing a snack to their young children. Four key themes could be distinguished to cluster the mentioned values. The health-related key theme includes all values that are associated with the healthiness of the product, the child-related key theme all values that connects to the child, the time-related key theme includes the value convenience and the product-related key theme includes all values that are associated with the product itself. Dutch and Polish mothers mostly valued health of the snack, whereas Indonesian and Italian mothers mostly valued the preference of their child. Data also shows specific prevalence between values and nationalities: convenience was very important for Dutch mothers, valuing organic food was typical for Polish mothers, religion played a role for Indonesian mothers, while Italian mothers placed more value on brand compared to the mothers of other cultures. In all cultures, the value conflicts mentioned were mainly related to health.

Meer hout uit het Nederlandse bos
Schelhaas, M. ; Clerkx, A.P.P.M. ; Schoonderwoerd, H. ; Damen, W. ; Oldenburger, J. - \ 2018
Vakblad Natuur Bos Landschap (2018)144. - ISSN 1572-7610 - p. 14 - 17.
Portion Control Opportunities in Children's Diets
Brouwer-Damen, F.W.M. ; Kleef, E. van; Agostoni, Carlo ; Almiron-Roig, Eva - \ 2017
Food Technology 71 (2017)11. - ISSN 0015-6639 - p. 44 - 51.
While the current food environment of large serving sizes, high calorie density, and plentiful and inexpensive options makes it difficult for parents to properly feed their kids, practical tools are emerging that support portion size management for children.
Exploring the floristic diversity of tropical Africa
Sosef, Marc S.M. ; Dauby, Gilles ; Blach-Overgaard, Anne ; Burgt, Xander van der; Catarino, Luís ; Damen, Theo ; Deblauwe, Vincent ; Dessein, Steven ; Dransfield, John ; Droissart, Vincent ; Duarte, Maria Cristina ; Engledow, Henry ; Fadeur, Geoffrey ; Figueira, Rui ; Gereau, Roy E. ; Hardy, Olivier J. ; Harris, David J. ; Heij, Janneke de; Janssens, Steven ; Klomberg, Yannick ; Ley, Alexandra C. ; Mackinder, Barbara A. ; Meerts, Pierre ; Poel, Jeike L. van de; Sonké, Bonaventure ; Stévart, Tariq ; Stoffelen, Piet ; Svenning, Jens Christian ; Sepulchre, Pierre ; Zaiss, Rainer ; Wieringa, Jan J. ; Couvreur, Thomas L.P. - \ 2017
BMC Biology 15 (2017)1. - ISSN 1741-7007
Botanical exploration - Digitization - Floristic patterns - Herbarium specimens - Plant growth form - Species richness - Tropical forests
Background: Understanding the patterns of biodiversity distribution and what influences them is a fundamental pre-requisite for effective conservation and sustainable utilisation of biodiversity. Such knowledge is increasingly urgent as biodiversity responds to the ongoing effects of global climate change. Nowhere is this more acute than in species-rich tropical Africa, where so little is known about plant diversity and its distribution. In this paper, we use RAINBIO - one of the largest mega-databases of tropical African vascular plant species distributions ever compiled - to address questions about plant and growth form diversity across tropical Africa. Results: The filtered RAINBIO dataset contains 609,776 georeferenced records representing 22,577 species. Growth form data are recorded for 97% of all species. Records are well distributed, but heterogeneous across the continent. Overall, tropical Africa remains poorly sampled. When using sampling units (SU) of 0.5°, just 21 reach appropriate collection density and sampling completeness, and the average number of records per species per SU is only 1.84. Species richness (observed and estimated) and endemism figures per country are provided. Benin, Cameroon, Gabon, Ivory Coast and Liberia appear as the botanically best-explored countries, but none are optimally explored. Forests in the region contain 15,387 vascular plant species, of which 3013 are trees, representing 5-7% of the estimated world's tropical tree flora. The central African forests have the highest endemism rate across Africa, with approximately 30% of species being endemic. Conclusions: The botanical exploration of tropical Africa is far from complete, underlining the need for intensified inventories and digitization. We propose priority target areas for future sampling efforts, mainly focused on Tanzania, Atlantic Central Africa and West Africa. The observed number of tree species for African forests is smaller than those estimated from global tree data, suggesting that a significant number of species are yet to be discovered. Our data provide a solid basis for a more sustainable management and improved conservation of tropical Africa's unique flora, and is important for achieving Objective 1 of the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation 2011-2020. In turn, RAINBIO provides a solid basis for a more sustainable management and improved conservation of tropical Africa's unique flora.
RAINBIO : A mega-database of tropical African vascular plants distributions
Dauby, Gilles ; Zaiss, Rainer ; Blach-Overgaard, Anne ; Catarino, Luís ; Damen, T.H.J. ; Deblauwe, Vincent ; Dessein, Steven ; Dransfield, John ; Droissart, Vincent ; Duarte, Maria Cristina ; Engledow, Henry ; Fadeur, Geoffrey ; Figueira, Rui ; Gereau, Roy E. ; Hardy, Olivier J. ; Harris, David J. ; Heij, Janneke De; Janssens, Steven ; Klomberg, Yannick ; Ley, Alexandra C. ; Mackinder, Barbara A. ; Meerts, Pierre ; Poel, Jeike van de; Sonké, Bonaventure ; Sosef, M.S.M. ; Stévart, Tariq ; Stoffelen, Piet ; Svenning, Jens Christian ; Sepulchre, Pierre ; Burgt, Xander Van Der; Wieringa, J.J. ; Couvreur, T.L.P. - \ 2016
Herbarium specimens - tropical forests - georeferencing - taxonomic backbone - habit - digitization - native species - cultivated species - biodiversity assessment
The tropical vegetation of Africa is characterized by high levels of species diversity but is undergoing important shifts in response to ongoing climate change and increasing anthropogenic pressures. Although our knowledge of plant species distribution patterns in the African tropics has been improving over the years, it remains limited. Here we present RAINBIO, a unique comprehensive mega-database of georeferenced records for vascular plants in continental tropical Africa. The geographic focus of the database is the region south of the Sahel and north of Southern Africa, and the majority of data originate from tropical forest regions. RAINBIO is a compilation of 13 datasets either publicly available or personal ones. Numerous in depth data quality checks, automatic and manual via several African flora experts, were undertaken for georeferencing, standardization of taxonomic names and identification and merging of duplicated records. The resulting RAINBIO data allows exploration and extraction of distribution data for 25,356 native tropical African vascular plant species, which represents ca. 89% of all known plant species in the area of interest. Habit information is also provided for 91% of these species.
RAINBIO : A mega-database of tropical African vascular plants distributions
Dauby, Gilles ; Zaiss, Rainer ; Blach-Overgaard, Anne ; Catarino, Luís ; Damen, Theo ; Deblauwe, Vincent ; Dessein, Steven ; Dransfield, John ; Droissart, Vincent ; Duarte, Maria Cristina ; Engledow, Henry ; Fadeur, Geoffrey ; Figueira, Rui ; Gereau, Roy E. ; Hardy, Olivier J. ; Harris, David J. ; Heij, Janneke de; Janssens, Steven ; Klomberg, Yannick ; Ley, Alexandra C. ; Mackinder, Barbara A. ; Meerts, Pierre ; Poel, Jeike L. van de; Sonké, Bonaventure ; Sosef, Marc S.M. ; Stévart, Tariq ; Stoffelen, Piet ; Svenning, Jens Christian ; Sepulchre, Pierre ; Burgt, Xander van der; Wieringa, Jan J. ; Couvreur, Thomas L.P. - \ 2016
Phytokeys 74 (2016). - ISSN 1314-2011 - p. 1 - 18.
Biodiversity assessment - Cultivated species - Digitization - Georeferencing - Habit - Herbarium specimens - Native species - Taxonomic backbone - Tropical forests

The tropical vegetation of Africa is characterized by high levels of species diversity but is undergoing important shifts in response to ongoing climate change and increasing anthropogenic pressures. Although our knowledge of plant species distribution patterns in the African tropics has been improving over the years, it remains limited. Here we present RAINBIO, a unique comprehensive mega-database of georeferenced records for vascular plants in continental tropical Africa. The geographic focus of the database is the region south of the Sahel and north of Southern Africa, and the majority of data originate from tropical forest regions. RAINBIO is a compilation of 13 datasets either publicly available or personal ones. Numerous in depth data quality checks, automatic and manual via several African flora experts, were undertaken for georeferencing, standardization of taxonomic names and identification and merging of duplicated records. The resulting RAINBIO data allows exploration and extraction of distribution data for 25,356 native tropical African vascular plant species, which represents ca. 89% of all known plant species in the area of interest. Habit information is also provided for 91% of these species.

Agro-Logistics
Vorst, J.G.A.J. van der - \ 2015
In: Feeding Tomorrow’s Cities / Latesteijn, van, H.C., Oostra, A., Damen - p. 28 - 29.
WET-tests on UV-treated ballast water
Kaag, N.H.B.M. - \ 2015
Den Helder : IMARES (Report / IMARES Wageningen UR C118/15) - 22
schepen - waterballast - waterbeheer - wetenschappelijk onderzoek - ultraviolette straling - waterzuivering - waterkwaliteit - ships - water ballasting - water management - scientific research - ultraviolet radiation - water treatment - water quality
Damen Shipyards has developed a barge-based ballast water management system (BWMS) that enables direct treatment of ballast water during discharge in a receiving harbour. The treatment is based upon filtration and a once-through UV-treatment. As part of the Type Approval process, the Dutch Authorities (IL&T) required an Environmental Acceptability document, based upon Whole Effluent Toxicity (WET) testing on freshwater and marine water, in order to ensure that no harmful levels of dis-infection byproducts (DBP) are formed by the UV-treatment.
Association of natural (auto-) antibodies in young gilts with osteochondrosis at slaughter
Koning, D.B. de; Damen, E.P.C.W. ; Nieuwland, M.G.B. ; Grevenhof, E.M. van; Hazeleger, W. ; Kemp, B. ; Parmentier, H.K. - \ 2015
Livestock Science 176 (2015). - ISSN 1871-1413 - p. 152 - 160.
serum-free culture - growth cartilage - epiphyseal growth - immune-responses - growing gilts - dairy-cows - chondrocytes - pigs - proteoglycans - lesions
Osteochondrosis (OC) develops at a young age and has been associated with lameness and reduced longevity of sows. Early detection of OC is therefore beneficial for selection against OC. Possibly, immunological components within the blood may serve as an indicator for OC development and could therefore be used as a biomarker. Levels of naturally occurring (auto-) antibodies (N[A]Ab) have been associated with homeostatic imbalance and various forms of inflammation, and may have an association with OC. The aim of this study was to investigate possible associations between the presence and levels of N(A)Ab of the IgM and IgG isotypes at an early age with OC in growing gilts at slaughter (24 weeks of age). Plasma samples were obtained from 212 Topigs 20 (Dutch Large White x Dutch Landrace) gilts at 6, 10, and 24 weeks of age and analyzed for N(A)Ab titers against 11 (auto-) antigens using ELISA. After slaughter, the elbow, hock, and knee joints were macroscopically examined for OC status. Due to low prevalence of OC in the elbow joint (5.4%), the elbow joint was not taken into account in analyses. Significant (P=0.05) associations with OC in both the hock joint and at the animal level (all joints combined) were found for IgM titers against chondroitin sulfate A at 6 weeks of age (OR 1.4 and 1.5), actin at 6 weeks of age (OR 1.4 and 1.3), thyroglobulin at 24 weeks of age (OR 1.5 and 1.3), and IgG titers against insulin at 6 weeks of age (OR 1.7 and 1.4). Additionally, significant (P=0.05) associations with OC were found at the knee joint for IgM titers against albumin at 6 weeks of age (OR 2.3), at the hock joint for IgM titers against keyhole limpet hemocyanin at 6 weeks of age (OR 1.4), and at the animal level for IgM titers against actin at 24 weeks of age (OR 1.3). This study indicated for the first time associations between the presence and levels of N(A)Ab at a young age and OC at 24 weeks of age in breeding gilts.
Burgers en natuur in de Haarlemmermeer : een inspirerend burgerinitiatief vanuit heemtuin De Heimanshof
Salverda, I.E. ; Dam, R.I. van; Weijer, H. - \ 2010
Damen
publieke tuinen - participatie - besluitvorming - stedelijke gebieden - haarlemmermeer - burgers - public gardens - participation - decision making - urban areas - citizens
De activiteiten van het initiatief vanuit De Heimanshof zijn gericht op het passief maar vooral actief betrekken van mensen bij de natuur in de Haarlemmermeer. De activiteiten bouwen op elkaar voort, versterken elkaar en gaan telkens een stapje verder in het aanspreken van betrokkenheid. Gezamenlijke inrichting en beheer van groen door bewoners heeft bijvoorbeeld positief effect op de sociale cohesie in een buurt
Cut-rose production in response to planting density in two contrasting cultivars
Burema, B.S. ; Buck-Sorlin, G.H. ; Damen, T. ; Vos, J. ; Heuvelink, E. ; Marcelis, L.F.M. - \ 2010
Acta Horticulturae 870 (2010). - ISSN 0567-7572 - p. 47 - 54.
Growing in lower planting density, rose plants produce more assimilates, which can be used to produce more and/or heavier flowering shoots. The effect of planting density was investigated during a period including the first five flowering flushes of a young crop. In a heated greenhouse two cut-rose cultivars were grown under bent canopy management. ‘Akito’ on own-roots and ‘Ilios’ on ‘Natal Briar’ rootstock were planted with densities of 8 and 4 plants per m2. Starting at the end of June 2007, flowering shoots were harvested over a time span of eight months. Based on ‘flowering flushes’, times of high harvest rate, the harvesting time span could be divided into five consecutive periods, each including one flush. The cultivars showed contrasting responses to planting density. In the first three periods the response in ‘Ilios’ was extraordinary, because at low density plants did not produce more flowering shoots, as would be expected. However, the response in shoot fresh weight was larger for ‘Ilios’ than for ‘Akito’, 35% compared to 21% over the entire study period. The results imply that there was a genetic difference in the effect of assimilate availability and/or local light environment. During the first three periods, these factors can not have influenced shoot number in ‘Ilios’, while they did in ‘Akito’. It is suggested that decreases of assimilate availability in winter caused the shoot number response to emerge for ‘Ilios’ later on.
Taxonomy of Atlantic Central African Orchids 1. A New Species of Angraecum set. Pectinaria (Orchidaceae) from Gabon and Equatorial Guinea.
Stévart, T. ; Cawoy, V. ; Damen, T.H.J. ; Droissart, V. - \ 2010
Systematic Botany 35 (2010)2. - ISSN 0363-6445 - p. 252 - 256.
vandeae - phylogenetics
During a recent survey of Atlantic central African orchids, we collected four orchid specimens in Rio Muni (Equatorial Guinea) that share the general morphology of Angraecum gabonense, the most frequent member of Angraecum section Pectinaria in Central Africa, but differ in leaf shape and flower size. Further inspection of specimens deposited at the Wageningen herbarium and cultivated in their greenhouse led to the discovery of additional specimens from the Monts Doudou area in Gabon. Comparison with other Angraecum specimens indicate that these collections represent a new species, which we describe here as Angraecum atlanticum, the fifth species of Angraecum section Pectinaria recorded in central Africa. The new species is restricted to submontane forests covering the mountain chain situated along the coasts of Gabon and Equatorial Guinea. The distinguishing features of the species include its leaves, which are more widely spaced than A. gabonese, and are 2.2 mm wide; its petals and sepals, which are slightly longer than the lip; its spur, which is somewhat inflated in the middle; and its larger ovary. Information on the ecology, phenology and distribution of Angraecum atlanticum is presented, along with a preliminary conservation assessment using the IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria.
Virtual rose: a new tool to optimize plant architecture in glasshouse rose production systems
Buck-Sorlin, G.H. ; Burema, B.S. ; Evers, J.B. ; Heijden, G.W.A.M. van der; Heuvelink, E. ; Marcelis, L.F.M. ; Struik, P.C. ; Visser, P.H.B. de; Damen, T.H.J. ; Vos, J. - \ 2007
In: Proceedings of the 5th International Workshop on Functional-Structural Plant Models, Napier, New Zealand, 4 - 9 November, 2007. - Hawke's Bay : Print Solutions - p. P48 - 1-P48-1.
Consumer behaviour and knowledge related to freezing and defrosting meat at home: An exploratory study
Damen, F.W.M. ; Steenbekkers, L.P.A. - \ 2007
British Food Journal 109 (2007)7. - ISSN 0007-070X - p. 511 - 518.
perceptions - foods
The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into the ways consumers freeze and defrost meat, the reasons for their behaviour and the knowledge they have about the process of freezing and defrosting. Consumers are aware of the microbiological safety risks involved in the consumption of meat. Therefore, many consumers freeze fresh meat to be able to store it safely for a longer period of time. In order to keep the quality of the meat, the freezing and defrosting process should follow certain basic principles.
Landbouw in de nieuwe EU-landen
Damen, J. ; Brink, A. van den; Duinhoven, G. van - \ 2002
Landwerk 3 (2002). - ISSN 1567-1844 - p. 40 - 43.
Modification of amino acid residues in carious dentin matrix
Kleter, G.A. ; Damen, J.J. ; Buijs, M.J. ; Cate, J.M. Ten - \ 1998
Journal of Dental Research 77 (1998)3. - ISSN 0022-0345 - p. 488 - 495.
A novel pyrroleninone cross-link from bovine dentine
Kleter, G.A. ; Damen, J.J. ; Kettenes van den Bosch, J.J. ; Bank, R.A. ; Koppele, J.M. Te; Veraart, J.R. ; Cate, J.M. Ten - \ 1998
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta. General subjects 1381 (1998)2. - ISSN 0304-4165 - p. 179 - 190.
Serological response of cattle to Brucella allergen after repeated intradermal applications of this allergen
Muskens, J.A.M. ; Bercovich, Z. ; Damen, C.P.R.M. - \ 1996
Veterinary Microbiology 48 (1996). - ISSN 0378-1135 - p. 174 - 178.
A study was conducted to determine whether an allergen that has been prepared from a mucoid strain of Brucella abortus triggers a serum antibody response that interferes with the interpretation of serologic tests results. Fifteen cattle seronegative for Brucella antigen were tested with the SDTH test several times. Blood samples were collected weekly and tested with the serum agglutination test and complement fixation test. Results show that some cattle tested seronegative after each of the SDTH tests while other cattle tested weakly positive with the serum agglutination test or the complement fixation test. All seropositive cattle tested seronegative 4–7 weeks after the last SDTH test indicating an antibody response of a transient nature. We conclude that serologic tests results indicating infection are reliable when recorded four weeks after a single SDTH test. If cattle are tested with the SDTH test several times an interval of seven weeks should be observed after the last test to ensure a reliable interpretation of the serologic tests results.
Transmission of solar radiation by a multispan Venlo-type glasshouse: validation of a model.
Heuvelink, E. ; Batta, L.G.G. ; Damen, T.H.J. - \ 1995
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 74 (1995). - ISSN 0168-1923 - p. 41 - 59.
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