Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

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A European Multi Lake Survey dataset of environmental variables, phytoplankton pigments and cyanotoxins
Mantzouki, E. ; Campbell, J. ; Loon, E. van; Visser, P. ; Konstantinou, I. ; Antoniou, M. ; Giuliani, G. ; Machado-Vieira, D. ; Gurjão de Oliveira, A. ; Maronić, D.Š. ; Stević, F. ; Pfeiffer, T.Ž. ; Vucelić, I.B. ; Žutinić, P. ; Udovič, M.G. ; Plenković-Moraj, A. ; Tsiarta, N. ; Bláha, L. ; Geriš, R. ; Fránková, M. ; Christoffersen, K.S. ; Warming, T.P. ; Feldmann, T. ; Laas, A. ; Panksep, K. ; Tuvikene, L. ; Kangro, K. ; Häggqvist, K. ; Salmi, P. ; Arvola, L. ; Fastner, J. ; Straile, D. ; Rothhaupt, K.O. ; Fonvielle, J. ; Grossart, H.P. ; Avagianos, C. ; Kaloudis, T. ; Triantis, T. ; Zervou, S.K. ; Hiskia, A. ; Gkelis, S. ; Panou, M. ; McCarthy, V. ; Senerpont Domis, L.N. de; Seelen, L. ; Verstijnen, Y. ; Lürling, M. ; Maliaka, V. ; Faassen, E.J. - \ 2018
Scientific Data 5 (2018). - ISSN 2052-4463 - 13 p.
Under ongoing climate change and increasing anthropogenic activity, which continuously challenge ecosystem resilience, an in-depth understanding of ecological processes is urgently needed. Lakes, as providers of numerous ecosystem services, face multiple stressors that threaten their functioning. Harmful cyanobacterial blooms are a persistent problem resulting from nutrient pollution and climate-change induced stressors, like poor transparency, increased water temperature and enhanced stratification. Consistency in data collection and analysis methods is necessary to achieve fully comparable datasets and for statistical validity, avoiding issues linked to disparate data sources. The European Multi Lake Survey (EMLS) in summer 2015 was an initiative among scientists from 27 countries to collect and analyse lake physical, chemical and biological variables in a fully standardized manner. This database includes in-situ lake variables along with nutrient, pigment and cyanotoxin data of 369 lakes in Europe, which were centrally analysed in dedicated laboratories. Publishing the EMLS methods and dataset might inspire similar initiatives to study across large geographic areas that will contribute to better understanding lake responses in a changing environment.
Temperature Effects Explain Continental Scale Distribution of Cyanobacterial Toxins
Lurling, M.F.L.L.W. ; Senerpont Domis, Lisette de; Seelen, Laura ; Verstijnen, Yvon ; Maliaka, Valentini ; Fastner, Jutta ; Teurlincx, Sven - \ 2018
Toxins 10 (2018)4. - ISSN 2072-6651
Insight into how environmental change determines the production and distribution of cyanobacterial toxins is necessary for risk assessment. Management guidelines currently focus on hepatotoxins (microcystins). Increasing attention is given to other classes, such as neurotoxins (e.g., anatoxin-a) and cytotoxins (e.g., cylindrospermopsin) due to their potency. Most studies examine the relationship between individual toxin variants and environmental factors, such as nutrients, temperature and light. In summer 2015, we collected samples across Europe to investigate the effect of nutrient and temperature gradients on the variability of toxin production at a continental scale. Direct and indirect effects of temperature were the main drivers of the spatial distribution in the toxins produced by the cyanobacterial community, the toxin concentrations and toxin quota. Generalized linear models showed that a Toxin Diversity Index (TDI) increased with latitude, while it decreased with water stability. Increases in TDI were explained through a significant increase in toxin variants such as MC-YR, anatoxin and cylindrospermopsin, accompanied by a decreasing presence of MC-LR. While global warming continues, the direct and indirect effects of increased lake temperatures will drive changes in the distribution of cyanobacterial toxins in Europe, potentially promoting selection of a few highly toxic species or strains
A collaborative evaluation of LC-MS/MS based methods for BMAA analysis : Soluble bound BMAA found to be an important fraction
Faassen, Els ; Antoniou, Maria G. ; Beekman-Lukassen, Wendy ; Blahova, Lucie ; Chernova, Ekaterina ; Christophoridis, Christophoros ; Combes, Audrey ; Edwards, Christine ; Fastner, Jutta ; Harmsen, Joop ; Hiskia, Anastasia ; Ilag, Leopold L. ; Kaloudis, Triantafyllos ; Lopicic, Srdjan ; Lurling, Miguel ; Mazur-Marzec, Hanna ; Meriluoto, Jussi ; Porojan, Cristina ; Viner-Mozzini, Yehudit ; Zguna, Nadezda - \ 2016
Marine Drugs 14 (2016)3. - ISSN 1660-3397
6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AQC) - Cycad - Daphnia magna - Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) - Internal standard - Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) - N-(2-aminoethyl) glycine (AEG) - Phytoplankton - Seafood - α,γ-diaminobutyric acid (DAB) - β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA)

Exposure to β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) might be linked to the incidence of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Analytical chemistry plays a crucial role in determining human BMAA exposure and the associated health risk, but the performance of various analytical methods currently employed is rarely compared. A CYANOCOST initiated workshop was organized aimed at training scientists in BMAA analysis, creating mutual understanding and paving the way towards interlaboratory comparison exercises. During this workshop, we tested different methods (extraction followed by derivatization and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis, or directly followed by LC-MS/MS analysis) for trueness and intermediate precision. We adapted three workup methods for the underivatized analysis of animal, brain and cyanobacterial samples. Based on recovery of the internal standard D3BMAA, the underivatized methods were accurate (mean recovery 80%) and precise (mean relative standard deviation 10%), except for the cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya. However, total BMAA concentrations in the positive controls (cycad seeds) showed higher variation (relative standard deviation 21%-32%), implying that D3BMAA was not a good indicator for the release of BMAA from bound forms. Significant losses occurred during workup for the derivatized method, resulting in low recovery (

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