Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Morphological classification of plant cell deaths
Doorn, W.G. van; Beers, E.P. ; Dangl, J.L. ; Franklin-Tong, V.E. ; Woltering, E.J. - \ 2011
Cell Death and Differentiation 18 (2011). - ISSN 1350-9047 - p. 1241 - 1246.
innate immune-response - hypersensitive response - self-incompatibility - arabidopsis - autophagy - senescence - apoptosis - contributes - xylogenesis - mechanisms
Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral part of plant development and of responses to abiotic stress or pathogens. Although the morphology of plant PCD is, in some cases, well characterised and molecular mechanisms controlling plant PCD are beginning to emerge, there is still confusion about the classification of PCD in plants. Here we suggest a classification based on morphological criteria. According to this classification, the use of the term ‘apoptosis’ is not justified in plants, but at least two classes of PCD can be distinguished: vacuolar cell death and necrosis. During vacuolar cell death, the cell contents are removed by a combination of autophagy-like process and release of hydrolases from collapsed lytic vacuoles. Necrosis is characterised by early rupture of the plasma membrane, shrinkage of the protoplast and absence of vacuolar cell death features. Vacuolar cell death is common during tissue and organ formation and elimination, whereas necrosis is typically found under abiotic stress. Some examples of plant PCD cannot be ascribed to either major class and are therefore classified as separate modalities. These are PCD associated with the hypersensitive response to biotrophic pathogens, which can express features of both necrosis and vacuolar cell death, PCD in starchy cereal endosperm and during self-incompatibility. The present classification is not static, but will be subject to further revision, especially when specific biochemical pathways are better defined
The self-incompatibility response in Papaver rhoeas pollen causes early and striking alterations to organelles
Geitmann, A. ; Franklin-Tong, V.E. ; Emons, A.M.C. - \ 2004
Cell Death and Differentiation 11 (2004)8. - ISSN 1350-9047 - p. 812 - 822.
programmed-cell-death - sunflower helianthus-annuus - induced apoptosis - hypersensitive response - mitochondrial structure - actin polymerization - free calcium - tube growth - hl-60 cells - protein
Self-incompatibility (SI) in Papaver rhoeas is accompanied by a cascade of signalling events that result in the rapid arrest and eventual death of the pollen tube. We have used rapid freeze fixation, freeze substitution and transmission electron microscopy to provide the first description of changes to pollen at the ultrastructural level during SI in this species. Our studies reveal that dramatic alterations to the morphology of mitochondria, Golgi bodies and ER occur within 1 h of SI induction. Similar symptoms have also been observed during programmed cell death (PCD) in some cell types. These include: the conspicuous condensation of the vegetative and generative nuclei, the swelling and loss of cristae in mitochondria and the disappearance of Golgi bodies. Some of the early alterations to the mitochondria and Golgi bodies observed at 1 h, almost certainly occur when cells are still alive. Other events, such as nuclear condensation, occur later and coincide with DNA fragmentation and the loss of cell viability. Our observations suggest that the SI response in P. rhoeas pollen may potentially involve a type of PCD.
Cytomechanical properties of papaver pollen tubes are altered after self-incompatibility challenge
Geitmann, A. ; McConnaughey, W. ; Lang-Pauluzzi, I. ; Franklin-Tong, V.E. ; Emons, A.M.C. - \ 2004
Biophysical Journal 86 (2004)5. - ISSN 0006-3495 - p. 3314 - 3323.
plant-cells - signaling pathways - oxidative burst - rhoeas l - growth - cytoskeleton - actin - tensegrity - mechanics - calcium
Self-incompatibility (SI) in Papaver rhoeas triggers a ligand-mediated signal transduction cascade, resulting in the inhibition of incompatible pollen tube growth. Using a cytomechanical approach we have demonstrated that dramatic changes to the mechanical properties of incompatible pollen tubes are stimulated by SI induction. Microindentation revealed that SI resulted in a reduction of cellular stiffness and an increase in cytoplasmic viscosity. Whereas the former cellular response is likely to be the result of a drop in cellular turgor, we hypothesize that the latter is caused by as yet unidentified cross-linking events. F-actin rearrangements, a characteristic phenomenon for SI challenge in Papaver, displayed a spatiotemporal gradient along the pollen tube; this suggests that signal propagation occurs in a basipetal direction. However, unexpectedly, local application of SI inducing S-protein did not reveal any evidence for localized signal perception in the apical or subapical regions of the pollen tube. To our knowledge this represents the first mechanospatial approach to study signal propagation and cellular responses in a well-characterized plant cell system. Our data provide the first evidence for mechanical changes induced in the cytoplasm of a plant cell stimulated by a defined ligand.
Early cellular events in pollen tubes during the self-incompatibility reaction
Geitmann, A. ; Emons, A.M.C. ; Franklin-Tong, V.E. - \ 2001
In: Cell Biology of Plant and Fungal Tip Growth / Geitmann, A., Cresti, M., Brenth Heath, I., Amsterdam : IOS Press - p. 203 - 219.
Signalling and the cytoskeleton of pollen tubes of Papaver rhoeas
Snowman, B.N. ; Geitmann, A. ; Clarke, S.R. ; Staiger, C.J. ; Franklin, F.C.H. ; Emons, A.M.C. ; Franklin-Tong, V.E. - \ 2000
Annals of Botany 85 (2000)Suppl. 1. - ISSN 0305-7364 - p. 49 - 57.
Self-incompatibility (SI) is a genetically controlled system used by many flowering plants to prevent self-pollination, often by the inhibition of pollen tube growth. The importance of cytosolic free calcium, [Ca2+]i, for the regulation of pollen tube growth is well known. We have established, using calcium imaging, that the SI response in Papaver rhoeas L. pollen involves a calcium-mediated intracellular signalling pathway. Tip growth of cells is dependent upon a typical configuration of the actin cytoskeleton, which is controlled by actin binding proteins. In animal cells, the actin-binding protein, profilin, is thought to act as a key intermediate between signalling pathways and actin rearrangements. Profilin is an abundant component of pollen. To better understand the signalling cascades that modulate pollen tip growth and actin dynamics, we are investigating a possible signalling role for profilin. We have demonstrated that profilin modulates the phosphorylation of pollen proteins in vitro. This implicates a role for profilin in altering protein kinase or phosphatase activity. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that profilin from pollen can be phosphorylated in vitro. This provides compelling evidence that profilin interacts with signalling pathways in angiosperms. Finally, we demonstrate that in the SI response, the actin cytoskeleton of incompatible pollen tubes is dramatically rearranged. Our data strongly support a role for the cytoskeleton and actin-binding proteins interacting with signalling pathways involved in the regulation of pollen tube growth.
Actin rearrangements in pollen tubes are stimulated by the self-incompatibility (si) response in Papaver rhoeas L
Snowman, B.N. ; Geitmann, A. ; Emons, A.M.C. ; Franklin-Tong, V.E. - \ 2000
In: Actin: a dynamic framework for multiple plant cell functions / Staiger, C.J., Balusa, F., Volkmann, D., Barlow, P.W., Dordrecht : Kluwer - p. 347 - 360.
Till death do us part : Pollen tubes undergo programmed cell death upon contact with a self-incompatible stigma
Geitmann, A. ; Franklin-Tong, V.E. ; Emons, A.M.C. - \ 2000
In: Cell Biology of Plant and Fungal Tip Growth, Siena Siena : - p. 22 - 22.
The self-incompatibility response in Papaver rhoeas pollen tubes involves dramatic changes of the actin cytoskeleton
Geitmann, A. ; Lang-Pauluzzi, I. ; Snowman, B.N. ; Franklin-Tong, V.E. ; Emons, A.M.C. - \ 2000
In: Abstr. XVIth. Int. Congr. on Sexual Plant Reprod., Banff, Alberta, 2000. - Banff, Alberta : [s.n.], 2000 - p. 87 - 87.
The self-incompatibility response in Papaver rhoeas pollen tubes involves dramatic changes of the actin cytoskeleton
Geitmann, A. ; Lang-Pauluzzi, I. ; Snowman, B. ; Franklin-Tong, V.E. ; Emons, A.M.C. - \ 2000
In: Biophysics: From molecules to cell. - Lunteren : [s.n.], 2000 - p. 12 - 12.
The self-incompatibility response in Papaver rhoeas pollen tubes involves dramatic changes of the actin cytoskeleton
Geitmann, A. ; Lang-Pauluzzi, I. ; Snowman, B. ; Franklin-Tong, V.E. ; Emons, A.M.C. - \ 2000
In: 15 th Meeting of the European Cytoskeleton Forum. - Blankenberge, Belgium : [s.n.], 2000 - p. 90 - 90.
The response of the pollen tube cytoskeleton to self-incompatibility factor in Papaver rhoeas
Geitmann, A. ; Lang-Pauluzzi, I. ; Snowman, B. ; Franklin-Tong, V.E. ; Emons, A.M.C. - \ 2000
In: Abstr. 12th FESPP Congress. - Budapest : [s.n.], 2000
Alterations in the actin cytoskeleton of pollen tubes are induced by the self-incompatibility reaction in Papaver rhoeas
Geitmann, A. ; Snowman, B.N. ; Emons, A.M.C. ; Franklin-Tong, V.E. - \ 2000
The Plant Cell 12 (2000). - ISSN 1040-4651 - p. 1239 - 1251.
Self-incompatibility (SI) is a genetically controlled process used to prevent self-pollination. In Papaver rhoeas, the induction of SI is triggered by a Ca2 -dependent signaling pathway that results in the rapid and S allele–specific inhibition of pollen tube tip growth. Tip growth of cells is dependent on a functioning actin cytoskeleton. We have investigated the effect of self-incompatibility (S) proteins on the actin cytoskeleton in poppy pollen tubes. Here, we report that the actin cytoskeleton of incompatible pollen tubes is rapidly and dramatically rearranged during the SI response, not only in our in vitro SI system but also in vivo. We demonstrate that nonspecific inhibition of growth does not result in similar actin rearrangements. Because the SI-induced alterations are not observed if growth stops, this clearly demonstrates that these alterations are triggered by the SI signaling cascade rather than merely resulting from the consequent inhibition of growth. We establish a detailed time course of events and discuss the mechanisms that might be involved. Our data strongly implicate a role for the actin cytoskeleton as a target for signaling pathways involved in the SI response of P. rhoeas.
Signal transduction in incompatible pollen tubes: the role of the cytoskeleton
Geitmann, A. ; Franklin-Tong, V.E. ; Emons, A.M.C. - \ 1999
In: Book of abstracts : 6th International Botanical Microscopy Meeting, St. Andrews, March 25-29, 1999 - p. 1 - 1.
The role of the cytoskeleton in signalling self-incompatibility in Papaver rhoeas pollen tubes
Geitmann, A. ; Snowman, B. ; Franklin-Tong, V.E. ; Emons, A.M.C. - \ 1999
In: Book of abstracts : Pollen-Stigma Interactions, Oxford, July 18-21 1999. - [S.l.] : [s.n.], 1999 - p. 49 - 49.
The role of the cytoskeleton in signaling self-incompatibility in Papaver rhoeas pollen tubes
Geitmann, A. ; Snowman, B. ; Franklin-Tong, V.E. ; Emons, A.M.C. - \ 1999
In: Book of abstracts : 14th Meeting of the European Cytoskeleton Forum August 28,September 2, 1999, Oeiras, Portugal - p. 1 - 1.
Signalling and the cytoskeleton in pollen tubes of Papaver rhoeas
Franklin-Tong, V.E. ; Geitmann, A. ; Snowman, B. ; Emons, A.M. ; Franklin, F.C.H. ; Staiger, C.J. - \ 1999
In: Book of abstracts : Pollen-Stigma Interactions, Oxford, July 18-21 1999. - [S.l.] : [s.n.], 1999 - p. 14 - 14.
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