Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Increasing quality of life in pulmonary arterial hypertension : is there a role for nutrition?
Vinke, Paulien ; Jansen, Suzanne M. ; Witkamp, Renger F. ; Norren, Klaske van - \ 2018
Heart Failure Reviews (2018). - ISSN 1382-4147 - 12 p.
Deficiencies - Exercise - Lifestyle - Nutrition - Pulmonary arterial hypertension - Review

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease primarily affecting the pulmonary vasculature and heart. PAH patients suffer from exercise intolerance and fatigue, negatively affecting their quality of life. This review summarizes current insights in the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying PAH. It zooms in on the potential involvement of nutritional status and micronutrient deficiencies on PAH exercise intolerance and fatigue, also summarizing the potential benefits of exercise and nutritional interventions. Pubmed/Medline, Scopus, and Web of Science were searched for publications on pathophysiological mechanisms of PAH negatively affecting physical activity potential and nutritional status, and for potential effects of interventions involving exercise or nutritional measures known to improve exercise intolerance. Pathophysiological processes that contribute to exercise intolerance and impaired quality of life of PAH patients include right ventricular dysfunction, inflammation, skeletal muscle alterations, and dysfunctional energy metabolism. PAH-related nutritional deficiencies and metabolic alterations have been linked to fatigue, exercise intolerance, and endothelial dysfunction. Available evidence suggests that exercise interventions can be effective in PAH patients to improve exercise tolerance and decrease fatigue. By contrast, knowledge on the prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies and the possible effects of nutritional interventions in PAH patients is limited. Although data on nutritional status and micronutrient deficiencies in PAH are scarce, the available knowledge, including that from adjacent fields, suggests that nutritional intervention to correct deficiencies and metabolic alterations may contribute to a reduction of disease burden.

Groei en productie van zwarte els in Nederland
Jansen, J.J. ; Oosterbaan, A. ; Mohren, G.M.J. ; Copini, P. ; Ouden, J. den - \ 2018
Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research (FEM Groei en Productie rapport 2018-10) - 47
In the Netherlands growth and yield research on black alder was done on a limited scale from 1965 to 1990. This regards two studies by the Dorschkamp/IBN research institute; together with the permanent sample plots from the timber prognosis system HOSP, this comprises a dataset of 14 plots with 59 recordings. In addition, the information from 518 stands of the Fourth National Forest Inventory was used. For the development of top height htop with age t Jansen’s et al. polymorphic model with site index h50 and four additional parameters fitted best. The diameter at a height of 7 m (d7) was estimated from data of the Fourth National Forest Inven-tory. The diameter development up to stand height of 7 m was described with a model of Jansen et al., a power function in htop and the estimated value for d7. From a stand height of 7 m upwards, the basal area increment (iG) was also described by Jansen’s et al. model based on a power function with t, year of recording (yor), and the stand density of Hart (S %). For S% > 15.7 the basal area increment decreases non-linear with increasing S %. The model contains a correction factor for yor, although this was not significant, as the year of recording (yor), turned out to be not significant. The effect of thinning on the diameter after thinning was modelled with the La Bastide-Faber model. The models were used to construct a yield table with five site classes and one thinning intensity.
Modelling the distribution and compositional variation of plant communities at the continental scale
Jiménez-Alfaro, Borja ; Suárez-Seoane, Susana ; Chytrý, Milan ; Hennekens, Stephan M. ; Willner, Wolfgang ; Hájek, Michal ; Agrillo, Emiliano ; Álvarez-Martínez, Jose M. ; Bergamini, Ariel ; Brisse, Henry ; Brunet, Jörg ; Casella, Laura ; Dítě, Daniel ; Font, Xavier ; Gillet, François ; Hájková, Petra ; Jansen, Florian ; Jandt, Ute ; Kącki, Zygmunt ; Lenoir, Jonathan ; Rodwell, John S. ; Schaminée, Joop H.J. ; Sekulová, Lucia ; Šibík, Jozef ; Škvorc, Željko ; Tsiripidis, Ioannis - \ 2018
Diversity and Distributions 24 (2018)7. - ISSN 1366-9516 - p. 978 - 990.
community distribution models - ecosystem properties - extent of occurrence - generalized dissimilarity modelling - habitat conservation - plant communities - vegetation
Aim: We investigate whether (1) environmental predictors allow to delineate the distribution of discrete community types at the continental scale and (2) how data completeness influences model generalization in relation to the compositional variation of the modelled entities. Location: Europe. Methods: We used comprehensive datasets of two community types of conservation concern in Europe: acidophilous beech forests and base-rich fens. We computed community distribution models (CDMs) calibrated with environmental predictors to predict the occurrence of both community types, evaluating geographical transferability, interpolation and extrapolation under different scenarios of sampling bias. We used generalized dissimilarity modelling (GDM) to assess the role of geographical and environmental drivers in compositional variation within the predicted distributions. Results: For the two community types, CDMs computed for the whole study area provided good performance when evaluated by random cross-validation and external validation. Geographical transferability provided lower but relatively good performance, while model extrapolation performed poorly when compared with interpolation. Generalized dissimilarity modelling showed a predominant effect of geographical distance on compositional variation, complemented with the environmental predictors that also influenced habitat suitability. Main conclusions: Correlative approaches typically used for modelling the distribution of individual species are also useful for delineating the potential area of occupancy of community types at the continental scale, when using consistent definitions of the modelled entity and high data completeness. The combination of CDMs with GDM further improves the understanding of diversity patterns of plant communities, providing spatially explicit information for mapping vegetation diversity and related habitat types at large scales.
Supplementation of fructooligosaccharides to suckling piglets affects intestinal microbiota colonization and immune development
Schokker, Dirkjan ; Fledderus, Jan ; Jansen, Rutger ; Vastenhouw, Stephanie A. ; Bree, Freddy M. de; Smits, Mari A. ; Jansman, Alfons A.J.M. - \ 2018
Journal of Animal Science 96 (2018)6. - ISSN 0021-8812 - p. 2139 - 2153.
Emerging knowledge shows the importance of early life events in programming the intestinal mucosal immune system and development of the intestinal barrier function. These processes depend heavily on close interactions between gut microbiota and host cells in the intestinal mucosa. In turn, development of the intestinal microbiota is largely dependent on available nutrients required for the specific microbial community structures to expand. It is currently not known what the specificities are of intestinal microbial community structures in relation to the programming of the intestinal mucosal immune system and development of the intestinal barrier function. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of a nutritional intervention on intestinal development of suckling piglets by daily oral administration of fructooligosaccharides (FOS) over a period of 12 d (days 2–14 of age). At the microbiota community level, a clear “bifidogenic” effect of the FOS administration was observed in the colon digesta at day 14. The former, however, did not translate into significant changes of local gene expression in the colonic mucosa. In the jejunum, significant changes were observed for microbiota composition at day 14, and microbiota diversity at day 25. In addition, significant differentially expressed gene sets in mucosal tissues of the jejunum were identified at both days 14 and 25 of age. At the age of 14 d, a lower activity of cell cycle–related processes and a higher activity of extracellular matrix processes were observed in the jejunal mucosa of piglets supplemented with FOS compared with control piglets. At day 25, the lower activity of immune-related processes in jejunal tissue was seen in piglets supplemented with FOS. Villi height and crypt depth in the jejunum were significantly different at day 25 between the experimental and control groups, where piglets supplemented with FOS had greater villi and deeper crypts. We conclude that oral FOS administration during the early suckling period of piglets had significant bifidogenic effects on the microbiota in the colon and on gene expression in the jejunal mucosa by thus far unknown mechanisms.
High adiposity is associated with higher nocturnal and diurnal glycaemia, but not with glycemic variability in older individuals without diabetes
Noordam, Raymond ; Huurman, Neline C. ; Wijsman, Carolien A. ; Akintola, Abimbola A. ; Jansen, Steffy W.M. ; Stassen, Stephanie ; Beekman, Marian ; Rest, Ondine van de; Slagboom, P.E. ; Mooijaart, Simon P. ; Heemst, Diana van - \ 2018
Frontiers in Endocrinology 9 (2018).
Adiposity - Body composition - Continuous glucose monitoring - Glycemia - Glycemic variability

Background: It is well known that adiposity is a risk factor for insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the associations of measures of adiposity with indices of glycemia and of glycemic variability over a 72-h period in non-diabetic older adults. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in non-diabetic individuals from the Active and Healthy Aging Study (N = 228), Switchbox (N = 116), and the Growing Old Together Study (N = 94). Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference were measured, and indices of glycemia and glycemic variability were derived from continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) using the Mini-Med® CGM system. Associations between adiposity and CGM were studied separately for the three cohorts, and derived estimates were subsequently meta-analyzed. Results: After meta-analyzing the results from the separate cohorts, individuals with a higher BMI had higher levels of glycemia. Individuals with BMI between 30 and 35 kg/m2 had 0.28 mmol/L [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.12-0.44] higher 72 h-mean glucose concentration, 0.26 mmol/L (0.10-0.42) higher diurnal glucose (6:00 a.m. to 0:00 a.m.), and 0.39 mmol/L (0.19; 0.59) higher nocturnal glucose (3:00 a.m. to 6:00 a.m.) than participants with a normal weight (BMI 18.5-25 kg/m2). However, no associations were observed between higher BMI and glycemic variability. Results for glycemia and glycemic variability were similarly observed for a high waist circumference. Conclusion: High adiposity associates with constant higher mean glucose levels over the day in non-diabetic older adults.

The persistence of a broad range of antibiotics during calve, pig and broiler manure storage
Berendsen, B.J.A. ; Lahr, J. ; Nibbeling, C. ; Jansen, L.J.M. ; Bongers, I.E.A. ; Wipfler, E.L. ; Schans, M.G.M. van de - \ 2018
Chemosphere 204 (2018). - ISSN 0045-6535 - p. 267 - 276.
Antibiotics - Dissipation - Environment - Fate - Manure - Persistence - Reviewer suggestions

After administration to livestock, a large fraction of antibiotics are excreted unchanged via excreta and can be transferred to agricultural land. For effective risk assessment a critical factor is to determine which antibiotics can be expected in the different environmental compartments. After excretion, the first relevant compartment is manure storage. In the current study, the fate of a broad scope of antibiotics (n = 46) during manure storage of different livestock animals (calves, pigs, broilers) was investigated. Manure samples were fortified with antibiotics and incubated during 24 days. Analysis was carried out by LC-MS. The dissipation of the antibiotics was modelled based on the recommendations of FOCUS working group. Sulphonamides relatively quickly dissipate in all manure types, with a DT90 of in general between 0.2 and 30 days. Tetracyclines (DT90 up to 422 days), quinolones (DT90 100–5800 days), macrolides (DT90 18–1000 days), lincosamides (DT90 135–1400 days) and pleuromutilins (DT90 of 49–1100 days) are in general much more persistent, but rates depend on the manure type. Specifically lincomycin, pirlimycin, tiamulin and most quinolones are very persistent in manure with more than 10% of the native compound remaining after a year in most manure types. For all compounds tested in the sub-set, except the macrolides, the dissipation was an abiotic process. Based on the persistence and current frequency of use, oxytetracycline, doxycycline, flumequine and tilmicosin can be expected to end up in environmental compartments. Ecotoxicological data should be used to further prioritize these compounds.

Bouwen aan vertrouwen: woningbouwprogrammering aan de vooravond van de omgevingswet : eindrapport PROSPER-onderzoek
Wichard, Lars ; Janssen-Jansen, Leonie ; Spit, Tejo - \ 2018
Wageningen : Wageningen Universiteit, Land Use Planning - ISBN 9789463432696 - 79
Databewakers: We moeten niet naïef zijn
Vernede, Raoul ; Brouwer, Maarten ; Jansen, Bert ; Knibbe, Willem Jan - \ 2018
Effects of wild ungulates on the regeneration, structure and functioning of temperate forests: A semi-quantitative review
Ramirez Chiriboga, J.I. ; Jansen, P.A. ; Poorter, L. - \ 2018
Forest Ecology and Management 424 (2018). - ISSN 0378-1127 - p. 406 - 419.
Wild ungulates such as red deer, roe deer and wild boar are key drivers of forest ecosystems. Across the northern hemisphere, their range and abundance is increasing, while at the same time forest conversion and habitat fragmentation have led to a large variation in ungulate density and composition among areas. Understanding ungulate density impacts are important in order to prevent shifts towards undesired states, such as from forest to heathland. Here, we assess the effects of ungulate density on forest regeneration, development and functioning. We carried out a systematic literature review of 433 published studies in temperate forests, and used the data to model dose-response curves of the effects of ungulate density on three sets of forest attributes; tree regeneration (abundance, species richness and composition), forest structure (horizontal and vertical), and forest functioning (nutrient cycling in soil, timber and food production). Ungulate density averaged 23.6 km−2 across studies. Ungulates had a negative effect on forest regeneration, structure and functioning in 70% of the evaluated cases. The dose-response curves had a sigmoidal, rather than a unimodal shape. Critical tipping points, where ungulates started to have a negative effect on forest regeneration, were found at an ungulate metabolic weight density of 115 kg km−2 for forest regeneration, 141 kg km−2 for forest structure, and 251 kg km−2 for forest functioning, which is roughly equivalent to 10, 13 and 23 roe deer per km−2. Forest regeneration was most sensitive to immediate browsing and trampling impacts of small seedlings, while forest functioning was least sensitive because of time lags. However, these effects may build up over time. We suggest research priorities for studying ungulate-plant interactions in temperate forests, and make management recommendations how to balance wildlife with a functioning forest.
Provenance, Ideology and the Public Interest in Planning
Janssen-Jansen, Leonie ; Lloyd, Greg - \ 2018
In: The Routledge Handbook of Institutions and Planning in Action / Salet, Willem, Routledge - ISBN 9781138085732
Comparative genomics of the nonlegume Parasponia reveals insights into evolution of nitrogen-fixing rhizobium symbioses
Velzen, R. van; Holmer, R. ; Bu, F. ; Rutten, L.J.J. ; Zeijl, A.L. van; Liu, W. ; Santuari, L. ; Cao, Q. ; Sharma, Trupti ; Shen, Defeng ; Purwana Roswanjaya, Yuda ; Wardhani, T. ; Seifi Kalhor, M. ; Jansen, Joelle ; Hoogen, D.J. van den; Güngör, Berivan ; Hartog, M.V. ; Hontelez, J. ; Verver, Jan ; Yang, Wei-Cai ; Schijlen, E.G.W.M. ; Repin, Rimi ; Schilthuizen, M. ; Schranz, M.E. ; Heidstra, R. ; Miyata, Kana ; Fedorova, E. ; Kohlen, W. ; Bisseling, A.H.J. ; Smit, S. ; Geurts, R. - \ 2018
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 115 (2018)20. - ISSN 0027-8424 - p. E4700 - E4709.
Nodules harboring nitrogen-fixing rhizobia are a well-known trait of legumes, but nodules also occur in other plant lineages, with rhizobia or the actinomycete Frankia as microsymbiont. It is generally assumed that nodulation evolved independently multiple times. However, molecular-genetic support for this hypothesis is lacking, as the genetic changes underlying nodule evolution remain elusive. We conducted genetic and comparative genomics studies by using Parasponia species (Cannabaceae), the only nonlegumes that can establish nitrogen-fixing nodules with rhizobium. Intergeneric crosses between Parasponia andersonii and its nonnodulating relative Trema tomentosa demonstrated that nodule organogenesis, but not intracellular infection, is a dominant genetic trait. Comparative transcriptomics of P. andersonii and the legume Medicago truncatula revealed utilization of at least 290 orthologous symbiosis genes in nodules. Among these are key genes that, in legumes, are essential for nodulation, including NODULE INCEPTION (NIN) and RHIZOBIUM-DIRECTED POLAR GROWTH (RPG). Comparative analysis of genomes from three Parasponia species and related nonnodulating plant species show evidence of parallel loss in nonnodulating species of putative orthologs of NIN, RPG, and NOD FACTOR PERCEPTION. Parallel loss of these symbiosis genes indicates that these nonnodulating lineages lost the potential to nodulate. Taken together, our results challenge the view that nodulation evolved in parallel and raises the possibility that nodulation originated ∼100 Mya in a common ancestor of all nodulating plant species, but was subsequently lost in many descendant lineages. This will have profound implications for translational approaches aimed at engineering nitrogen-fixing nodules in crop plants.
Groei en productie van ruwe berk in Nederland
Jansen, J.J. ; Oosterbaan, A. ; Mohren, G.M.J. ; Ouden, J. den - \ 2018
Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research (FEM Groei en Productie rapport 2018-13) - 41
In the Netherlands growth and yield research on silver birch was done from 1982 to 1994. This includes studies by the Dorschkamp/IBN research institute and by Wageningen University. To-gether with the permanent sample plots from the timber prognosis system HOSP, this comprises a dataset of 43 plots with 132 recordings. For the development of top height htop with age t Cieszewski’s polymorphic model with site index h50 and three additional parameters fitted best.The diameter at a height of 7 m (d7) was estimated with the plot data and with the data of the Fourth National Forest Inventory, and the average of both estimates was chosen. The diameter develop-ment up to stand height of 7 m was described with a model of Jansen et al., a power function in htop and the estimated value for d7. From a stand height of 7 m upwards, the basal area increment (iG) was also described by Jansen’s et al. model based on a power function with h50, t, year of recording (yor), and the stand density of Hart (S %). For S% > 19.5 the basal area increment decreases non-lin-ear with increasing S %. The model contains a correction factor for yor, although this was not signifi-cant, as the year of recording (yor), turned out to be not significant. The effect of thinning on the di-ameter after thinning was modelled with the La Bastide-Faber model.The models were used to construct a yield table with five site classes and one thinning intensity.
A Dutch perspective on urban growth boundaries : From containing to stimulating growth
Janssen-Jansen, Leonie ; Tan, Wendy - \ 2018
In: Instruments of Land Policy Taylor and Francis - ISBN 9781138201514 - p. 137 - 141.
Within international planning educational circles, the Netherlands has long been held up as an exemplar of effective national and regional land use planning practices. Well-known examples are the water management policies (van der Cammen and de Klerk 2012). The clearly defined administrative hierarchies, the policy consistency, and the management of the land resource with governmental controls in planning have been praised in planning literature. The Dutch planning system is seen as a great example for other countries, just as Sullivan’s Portland example (Bontje 2003; Fainstein 2005). The urban growth boundary (UGB) of the Regional Framework Plan of Portland is likewise one of the most outstanding elements of the land use planning system in State of Oregon. This is an example of an instrument accompanied by many other complementary ordinances, regulations, and rules that together result in a desired planning outcome. The UGB is therefore often compared to national planning instruments in the Netherlands intent on enforcing a strict boundary between the urban and the rural. In the Netherlands, this divide has always been a keystone concept of the land use planning system, which is to keep as much open space ‘open’ as possible, while concurrently address the need for expansion and growth by ensuring enough land for residential development in a context of land scarcity in the upcoming decades. This is a similar situation to Portland where the growth necessary for the next 20 years needs to be balanced by the geographical constraints of the nature and agricultural areas. Although the regional UGB enjoys statutory status in Portland, regional coordination is considered an informal norm within the Netherlands. For example, certain provinces keep to an 80–20 rule, whereby the majority of new developments should take place within existing urban contours. The regional focus of Portland’s planning system is relevant for international planners as most land use issues tend to cross administrative borders in nature and involve more than a single government level. On the surface, the Dutch planning system might not have much to offer as compared to Portland as the legal force is maintained mostly at the local level in the form of municipal land use plans (Needham 2016). Although the 2008 revision of the planning law (WRO 2008) does enable regional and inter-municipal zoning plans 138that can be brought forward by multiple municipalities or proposed by the Dutch regional government – the province – this instrument has been hardly implemented. From the provincial perspective, ‘overthrowing’ municipalities is politically not popular; municipalities – and their governors – focus on the land in their municipality as they are accountable for planning within the municipality, not outside.
Groei en productie van gewone esdoorn in Nederland
Jansen, J.J. ; Oosterbaan, A. ; Mohren, G.M.J. ; Ouden, J. den - \ 2018
Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research (FEM Groei en Productie rapport 2018-12) - 41
In the Netherlands growth and yield research on sycamore was done from 1976 to 2001. This includes studies by the Dorschkamp/IBN research institute and by Wageningen University. To-gether with the permanent sample plots from the timber prognosis system HOSP, this comprises a dataset of 32 plots with 113 recordings. For the development of top height htop with age t Cieszewski’s polymorphic model with site index h50 and three additional parameters fitted best.The diameter development up to stand height of 7 m was described with a model of Jansen et al., a power function in htop and initial spacing (N0). From a stand height of 7 m upwards, the basal area in-crement (iG) was described by Jansen’s et al. model based on a power function with htop, t, year of re-cording (yor), and the stand density of Hart (S %). For S% > 16.3 the basal area increment decreases non-linearly with increasing %. The model contains a correction factor for yor, although this was not significant, as the year of recording (yor), turned out to be not significant. The effect of thinning on the diameter after thinning was modelled with the La Bastide-Faber model.The models were used to construct a yield table with five site classes and one thinning intensity.
Taxonomy of the family Arenaviridae and the order Bunyavirales : update 2018
Maes, Piet ; Alkhovsky, Sergey V. ; Bào, Yīmíng ; Beer, Martin ; Birkhead, Monica ; Briese, Thomas ; Buchmeier, Michael J. ; Calisher, Charles H. ; Charrel, Rémi N. ; Choi, Il Ryong ; Clegg, Christopher S. ; Torre, Juan Carlos de la; Delwart, Eric ; DeRisi, Joseph L. ; Bello, Patrick L. Di; Serio, Francesco Di; Digiaro, Michele ; Dolja, Valerian V. ; Drosten, Christian ; Druciarek, Tobiasz Z. ; Du, Jiang ; Ebihara, Hideki ; Elbeaino, Toufic ; Gergerich, Rose C. ; Gillis, Amethyst N. ; Gonzalez, Jean Paul J. ; Haenni, Anne Lise ; Hepojoki, Jussi ; Hetzel, Udo ; Hồ, Thiện ; Hóng, Ní ; Jain, Rakesh K. ; Jansen van Vuren, Petrus ; Jin, Qi ; Jonson, Miranda Gilda ; Junglen, Sandra ; Keller, Karen E. ; Kemp, Alan ; Kipar, Anja ; Kondov, Nikola O. ; Koonin, Eugene V. ; Kormelink, Richard ; Korzyukov, Yegor ; Krupovic, Mart ; Lambert, Amy J. ; Laney, Alma G. ; LeBreton, Matthew ; Lukashevich, Igor S. ; Marklewitz, Marco ; Markotter, Wanda ; Martelli, Giovanni P. ; Martin, Robert R. ; Mielke-Ehret, Nicole ; Mühlbach, Hans Peter ; Navarro, Beatriz ; Ng, Terry Fei Fan ; Nunes, Márcio Roberto Teixeira ; Palacios, Gustavo ; Pawęska, Janusz T. ; Peters, Clarence J. ; Plyusnin, Alexander ; Radoshitzky, Sheli R. ; Romanowski, Víctor ; Salmenperä, Pertteli ; Salvato, Maria S. ; Sanfaçon, Hélène ; Sasaya, Takahide ; Schmaljohn, Connie ; Schneider, Bradley S. ; Shirako, Yukio ; Siddell, Stuart ; Sironen, Tarja A. ; Stenglein, Mark D. ; Storm, Nadia ; Sudini, Harikishan ; Tesh, Robert B. ; Tzanetakis, Ioannis E. ; Uppala, Mangala ; Vapalahti, Olli ; Vasilakis, Nikos ; Walker, Peter J. ; Wáng, Guópíng ; Wáng, Lìpíng ; Wáng, Yànxiăng ; Wèi, Tàiyún ; Wiley, Michael R. ; Wolf, Yuri I. ; Wolfe, Nathan D. ; Wú, Zhìqiáng ; Xú, Wénxìng ; Yang, Li ; Yāng, Zuòkūn ; Yeh, Shyi Dong ; Zhāng, Yǒng Zhèn ; Zhèng, Yàzhōu ; Zhou, Xueping ; Zhū, Chénxī ; Zirkel, Florian ; Kuhn, Jens H. - \ 2018
Archives of Virology (2018). - ISSN 0304-8608 - p. 1 - 16.
In 2018, the family Arenaviridae was expanded by inclusion of 1 new genus and 5 novel species. At the same time, the recently established order Bunyavirales was expanded by 3 species. This article presents the updated taxonomy of the family Arenaviridae and the order Bunyavirales as now accepted by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) and summarizes additional taxonomic proposals that may affect the order in the near future.
Groei en productie van es in Nederland
Jansen, J.J. ; Goudzwaard, L. ; Oosterbaan, A. ; Mohren, G.M.J. ; Ouden, J. den - \ 2018
Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research (FEM Groei en Productie rapport 2018-11) - 43
In the Netherlands growth and yield research on ash was done from 1949 to 1988. This in-cludes studies by the Dorschkamp/IBN research institute and by Wageningen University. Together with the permanent sample plots from the timber prognosis system HOSP, all this comprises a da-taset of 41 plots with 150 recordings. For the development of top height htop with age t, Cieszewski’s polymorphic model with site index h50 and three additional parameters fitted best.The diameter development up to stand height of 7 m was described with a linear function in htop and tree distance. From a stand height of 7 m and up, the basal area increment (iG) was described by Jan-sen’s et al. model based on a power function with h50, htop, t, year of recording (yor), and the stand density of Hart (S %). For S% > 16.7 the basal area increment strongly decreases non-linearly with in-creasing %. The model contains a correction factor for yor, but this was not significant, nor was htop. The effect of thinning on the diameter after thinning was modelled with a modified La Bastide-Faber model. The models were used to construct yield tables for with five site classes and one thinning in-tensity.
Groei en productie van Amerikaanse eik in Nederland
Jansen, J.J. ; Oosterbaan, A. ; Mohren, G.M.J. ; Ouden, J. den - \ 2018
Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research (FEM Groei en Productie rapport 2018-9) - 41
In the Netherlands growth and yield research on red oak was done from 1949 to 1988. This includes studies by Becking and by the Dorschkamp/IBN research institute. Together with the perma-nent sample plots from the timber prognosis system HOSP, all this comprises a dataset of 58 plots with 306 recordings. For the development of top height htop with age t, Jansen & Hildebrand’s poly-morphic model with site index h70 and three additional parameters fitted best.The diameter development up to stand height of 7 m was described with a linear function in htop and initial density (N0). From a stand height of 7 m and up, the basal area increment (iG) was described by Jansen’s et al. model based on a power function with htop, t, year of recording (yor), and the stand density index of Hart (S %). For S% > 19.1 the basal area increment drops strongly non-linear with in-creasing S%. The model contains a correction factor for yor, which was not significant. The effect of thinning on the diameter after thinning, was modelled with a modified La Bastide-Faber model. The model was used to construct yield tables for with five site classes and one thinning intensity
Groei en productie van populier in Nederland
Jansen, J.J. ; Mohren, G.M.J. ; Schmidt, P. ; Goudzwaard, L. ; Oosterbaan, A. ; Ouden, J. den - \ 2018
Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research (FEM Groei en Productie rapport 2018-8) - 127
Between 1947 and 2000, growth and yield of Poplar was studied in the Netherlands. To the permanent plots measured by Becking and De Dorschkamp/IBN, the permanent sample plots from HOSP were added, resulting in 235 plots and 1808 recordings.The development of the mean height hm with age t was found to be best described by a Chapman-Richards-model, with adjustment factors for dense stand and for different parameters for forest stands, line plantings, and for aspen, using site index h25. The diameter development up to a height of 7 m was best described with a Gompertz-model in t, hm and the initial spacing (SP0).The basal area increment IG was best explained by a power function in which hm, age, h25 and the Becking-Hart spacing index S% are included. For S% > 29.2 the basal area increment dropped with a non-linear function in S%. For dense spacing and for line plantings, other models fitted best.Combining all models, a stand projection model was constructed, which described the plot develop-ment as measured reasonably well.Yield tables were made for forests with different spacing, for forests with a wide stand with and with-out systematically thinning, for forest with very dense spacing including mortality, for line plantings without thinning, and for aspen with heavy thinning from below
Groei en productie van Oostenrijkse den in Nederland
Jansen, J.J. ; Oosterbaan, A. ; Mohren, G.M.J. ; Ouden, J. den - \ 2018
Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research (FEM Groei en Productie rapport 2018-7) - 96
In the Netherlands, growth and yield research on Austrian pine was done from 1925 to 1990. This include studies by the Dorschkamp/IBN research institute. Together with the permanent sample plots from the timber prognosis system HOSP, all this comprises a dataset of 117 plots with 486 recordings. For the development of top height htop over age (t), Jansen & Hildebrand’s model with asymptote and 3 additional parameters fitted best. As site index, top height at 50 year (h50) was chosen. The diameter development up to stand height of 7 m was best described with a power func-tion based on htop, the density after refinements (NR), and h50. From a stand height of 7 m and up, the basal area increment (iG) was best described by a power function based on htop, t, and the stand den-sity index of Hart (S%). For S % > 28.7 the basal area increment drops with increasing S %. The effect of thinning on diameter after thinning was modelled with a modified La Bastide-Faber model. With all models together, a stand projection model was constructed, which follows the measured stand development reasonably well. The model was used to construct yield tables with seven site classes and six thinning intensities.
Groei en productie van Corsicaanse den in Nederland
Jansen, J.J. ; Oosterbaan, A. ; Mohren, G.M.J. ; Ouden, J. den - \ 2018
Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research (FEM Groei en Productie rapport 2018-6) - 109
In the Netherlands, growth and yield research on Corsican pine was done from 1925 to 1990. This includes studies by Becking and by the Dorschkamp/IBN research institute. Together with the permanent sample plots from the timber prognosis system HOSP, all this comprises a dataset of 193 plots with 869 recordings. For the development of top height htop over age (t), Jansen & Hilde-brand’s model with asymptote and 3 additional parameters fitted best. As site index, top height at 50 year (h50) was chosen. The diameter development up to stand height of 7 m was best described with a Gompertz function based on htop, the density after refinements (NR), and h50. From a stand height of 7 m and up, the basal area increment (iG) was best described by a power function based on htop, t, and the stand density index of Hart (S %). For S % > 22.4 the basal area increment drops with increas-ing S %. The year of recording in relation with Brunchorstia dieback was also included in the model. The effect of thinning on diameter after thinning was modelled with a modified La Bastide-Faber model. With all models together, a stand projection model was constructed, which follows the meas-ured stand development reasonably well. The model was used to construct yield tables with seven site classes and six thinning intensities.
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