Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Considerations and consequences of allowing DNA sequence data as types of fungal taxa
Zamora, Juan Carlos ; Svensson, Måns ; Kirschner, Roland ; Olariaga, Ibai ; Ryman, Svengunnar ; Parra, Luis Alberto ; Geml, József ; Rosling, Anna ; Adamčík, Slavomír ; Ahti, Teuvo ; Aime, M.C. ; Ainsworth, A.M. ; Albert, László ; Albertó, Edgardo ; García, Alberto Altés ; Ageev, Dmitry ; Agerer, Reinhard ; Aguirre-Hudson, Begoña ; Ammirati, Joe ; Andersson, Harry ; Angelini, Claudio ; Antonín, Vladimír ; Aoki, Takayuki ; Aptroot, André ; Argaud, Didier ; Sosa, Blanca Imelda Arguello ; Aronsen, Arne ; Arup, Ulf ; Asgari, Bita ; Assyov, Boris ; Atienza, Violeta ; Bandini, Ditte ; Baptista-Ferreira, João Luís ; Baral, Hans-Otto ; Baroni, Tim ; Barreto, Robert Weingart ; Beker, Henry ; Bell, Ann ; Bellanger, Jean-Michel ; Bellù, Francesco ; Bemmann, Martin ; Bendiksby, Mika ; Bendiksen, Egil ; Bendiksen, Katriina ; Benedek, Lajos ; Bérešová-Guttová, Anna ; Berger, Franz ; Berndt, Reinhard ; Bernicchia, Annarosa ; Biketova, Alona Yu. ; Bizio, Enrico ; Bjork, Curtis ; Boekhout, Teun ; Boertmann, David ; Böhning, Tanja ; Boittin, Florent ; Boluda, Carlos G. ; Boomsluiter, Menno W. ; Borovička, Jan ; Brandrud, Tor Erik ; Braun, Uwe ; Brodo, Irwin ; Bulyonkova, Tatiana ; Burdsall, Harold H. ; Buyck, Bart ; Burgaz, Ana Rosa ; Calatayud, Vicent ; Callac, Philippe ; Campo, Emanuele ; Candusso, Massimo ; Capoen, Brigitte ; Carbó, Joaquim ; Carbone, Matteo ; Castañeda-ruiz, Rafael F. ; Castellano, Michael A. ; Chen, Jie ; Clerc, Philippe ; Consiglio, Giovanni ; Corriol, Gilles ; Courtecuisse, Régis ; Crespo, Ana ; Cripps, Cathy ; Crous, Pedro W. ; Silva, Gladstone Alves Da ; Silva, Meiriele Da ; Dam, Marjo ; Dam, Nico ; Dämmrich, Frank ; Das, Kanad ; Davies, Linda ; Crop, Eske De; Kesel, Andre De; Kuijper, T.W.M. - \ 2018
IMA fungus 9 (2018)1. - ISSN 2210-6340 - p. 167 - 185.
Nomenclatural type definitions are one of the most important concepts in biological nomenclature. Being physical objects that can be re-studied by other researchers, types permanently link taxonomy (an artificial agreement to classify biological diversity) with nomenclature (an artificial agreement to name biological diversity). Two proposals to amend the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (ICN), allowing DNA sequences alone (of any region and extent) to serve as types of taxon names for voucherless fungi (mainly putative taxa from environmental DNA sequences), have been submitted to be voted on at the 11th International Mycological Congress (Puerto Rico, July 2018). We consider various genetic processes affecting the distribution of alleles among taxa and find that alleles may not consistently and uniquely represent the species within which they are contained. Should the proposals be accepted, the meaning of nomenclatural types would change in a fundamental way from physical objects as sources of data to the data themselves. Such changes are conducive to irreproducible science, the potential typification on artefactual data, and massive creation of names with low information content, ultimately causing nomenclatural instability and unnecessary work for future researchers that would stall future explorations of fungal diversity. We conclude that the acceptance of DNA sequences alone as types of names of taxa, under the terms used in the current proposals, is unnecessary and would not solve the problem of naming putative taxa known only from DNA sequences in a scientifically defensible way. As an alternative, we highlight the use of formulas for naming putative taxa (candidate taxa) that do not require any modification of the ICN.
An environmental assessment of biorefining of rubber dandelion to rubber and bioplastic
Hingsamer, Maria ; Canella, Lorenza ; Jungmeier, Gerfried ; Meer, Ingrid van der; Dijk, Peter van; Muylle, Hilde ; Kirschner, Jan ; Kappen, Frans ; Gevers, Nico ; Hruschka, Steffen - \ 2018
In: 26th European Biomass Conference and Exhibition Proceedings. - Florence : ETA-Florence Renewable Energies (European Biomass Conference and Exhibition Proceedings ) - ISBN 9788889407189 - p. 1103 - 1105.
Biobased economy - Bioplastic - Biorefinery - Novel crop - Rubber
‘DRIVE4EU - Dandelion Rubber and Inulin Valorization and Exploitation for Europe’, a demonstration project, aims at the development of a value chain for natural rubber and inulin from Rubber dandelions. The objective of the project is to set up a new European chain for the production and processing of natural rubber. This will enable the EU to become less dependent on the import of natural rubber and at the same time to respond to the threat of a global rubber shortage. The viability of using Rubber dandelions for rubber and inulin for bioplastics (PEF – Polyethylene Furanoate) production depends on the sustainability of this new value chain. Within the project an environmental assessment using the methodology of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is performed. The aim is to identify, quantify and assess the most important environmental impacts and benefits of rubber and inulin from Rubber dandelion based on the whole value chain. Within the LCA scientific environmental indicators (e.g. global warming potential, cumulated primary energy demand, land use, water use, and acidification) will be used to guide the development of the DRIVE4EU value chain to realize the highest possible sustainability in comparison to a substituted reference system (natural rubber from Hevea tree and PET from fossil resources). The combination of natural rubber and inulin makes Rubber dandelion very interesting as a production platform.
Increased transgenerational epigenetic variation, but not predictable epigenetic variants, after environmental exposure in two apomictic dandelion lineages
Preite, Veronica ; Oplaat, Carla ; Biere, Arjen ; Kirschner, Jan ; Putten, Wim H. van der; Verhoeven, Koen J.F. - \ 2018
Ecology and Evolution 8 (2018)5. - ISSN 2045-7758 - p. 3047 - 3059.
DNA methylation - drought - Europe - salicylic acid - stress memory - Taraxacum officinale
DNA methylation is one of the mechanisms underlying epigenetic modifications. DNA methylations can be environmentally induced and such induced modifications can at times be transmitted to successive generations. However, it remains speculative how common such environmentally induced transgenerational DNA methylation changes are and if they persist for more than one offspring generation. We exposed multiple accessions of two different apomictic dandelion lineages of the Taraxacum officinale group (Taraxacum alatum and T. hemicyclum) to drought and salicylic acid (SA) treatment. Using methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphism markers (MS-AFLPs) we screened anonymous methylation changes at CCGG restriction sites throughout the genome after stress treatments and assessed the heritability of induced changes for two subsequent unexposed offspring generations. Irrespective of the initial stress treatment, a clear buildup of heritable DNA methylation variation was observed across three generations, indicating a considerable background rate of heritable epimutations. Less evidence was detected for environmental effects. Drought stress showed some evidence for accession-specific methylation changes, but only in the exposed generation and not in their offspring. By contrast, SA treatment caused an increased rate of methylation change in offspring of treated plants. These changes were seemingly undirected resulting in increased transgenerational epigenetic variation between offspring individuals, but not in predictable epigenetic variants. While the functional consequences of these MS-AFLP-detected DNA methylation changes remain to be demonstrated, our study shows that (1) stress-induced transgenerational DNA methylation modification in dandelions is genotype and context-specific; and (2) inherited environmental DNA methylation effects are mostly undirected and not targeted to specific loci.
A New Value Chain for Rubber and Inulin Production in the European BioEconomy
Hingsamer, Maria ; Beerman, M. ; Jungmeier, Gerfried ; Meer, I.M. van der; Dijk, P. van; Muylle, Hilde ; Kirschner, Jan ; Kappen, F.H.J. ; Gevers, N. - \ 2017
biobased economy - biobased materials - biomass - rubber - taraxacum kok-saghyz - inulin
DRIVE4EU - ‘Dandelion Rubber and Inulin Valorization and Exploitation for Europe’, a European demonstration project sets up a European chain for the production and processing of natural rubber and inulin from Taraxacum koksaghyz (TKS, Rubber dandelion) to become less dependent on the import of natural rubber. Natural rubber is a sustainable material that is used for more than 40,000 products, e.g. natural rubber is applied in construction (adhesives, sealants), medicine (gloves, tubing) and transportation (matting, tyres) industries. Because of the specific quality aspects of natural rubber in many products it cannot be replaced by synthetic rubber. At the moment natural rubber is exclusively harvested from the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) of which about 90% is grown in South East Asia.
A New Value Chain for Rubber and Inulin Production in the European BioEconomy
Hingsamer, M. ; Beerman, M. ; Jungmeier, G. ; Meer, I.M. van der; Dijk, P. van; Muylle, H. ; Kirschner, J. ; Kappen, F.H.J. ; Gevers, N. - \ 2017
In: A New Value Chain for Rubber and Inulin Production in the European BioEconomy Florence : ETA-Florence Renewable Energies (European Biomass Conference and Exhibition Proceedings ) - ISBN 9788889407172 - p. 1292 - 1293.
‘DRIVE4EU - Dandelion Rubber and Inulin Valorization and Exploitation for Europe’, a demonstration project, aims at the development of a value chain for natural rubber and inulin from Rubber dandelions. The objective of the project is to set up a new European chain for the production and processing of natural rubber. This will enable the EU to become less dependent on the import of natural rubber and at the same time to respond to the threat of a global rubber shortage. The viability of using Rubber dandelions for rubber and inulin production depends on the sustainability of this new value chain. The results of a general economic assessment shows that the total costs over the whole value chain are dominated by the costs for cultivation and harvesting and the cost for biorefining. The combination of natural rubber and inulin makes Rubber dandelion very interesting as a production platform.
Promoting Argumentation Competence: Extending from First- to Second-Order Scaffolding Through Adaptive Fading
Noroozi, Omid ; Kirschner, Paul A. ; Biemans, Harm J.A. ; Mulder, Martin - \ 2017
Educational Psychology Review 30 (2017)1. - ISSN 1040-726X - p. 153 - 176.
Argumentation is fundamental for many learning assignments, ranging from primary school to university and beyond. Computer-supported argument scaffolds can facilitate argumentative discourse along with concomitant interactive discussions among learners in a group (i.e., first-order argument scaffolding). However, there is no evidence, and hence no knowledge, of whether such argument scaffolds can help students acquire argumentation competence that can be transferred by the students themselves to various similar learning tasks (i.e., second-order argument scaffolding). Therefore, this conceptual article argues that the focus of argument scaffold design and research should be expanded: from the study of first-order scaffolding alone to including the study of second-order scaffolding as well. On the basis of the Script Theory of Guidance (SToG), this paper presents a guideline for second-order argument scaffolding using diagnosis of the student’s internal argumentative script and offering adaptive external support and various fading mechanisms. It also explains how to complement adaptive fading support with peer assessment, automatic response tools, and adaptable self-assessment to ensure that learners actually understand, learn, and apply targeted argumentation activities in similar situations.
Identification of oligoclonal agamospermous microspecies : Taxonomic specialists versus microsatellites
Kirschner, Jan ; Oplaat, Carla ; Verhoeven, Koen J.F. ; Zeisek, Vojtěch ; Uhleman, Ingo ; Trávníček, Bohumil ; Räsänen, Juhani ; Wilschut, Rutger A. ; Štěpánek, Jan - \ 2016
Preslia 88 (2016)1. - ISSN 0032-7786 - p. 1 - 17.
Agamospermy - Clonality - Microsatellite variation - Plant identification - Population variation - Taraxacum - Taxonomy

There has been a decrease in the ability of biologists to identify their material correctly, particularly plants of complicated genera with common agamospermy, where old clonal entities are accorded the rank of species (microspecies). Agamospermous microspecies are taxonomic entities recognizable from one another by a set of minute morphological features. The knowledge of microspecies is confined to a few specialists. Specialists use microspecies names but there could be inconsistencies in the taxonomic concepts used by different, geographically remote experts. A selection of nine widespread, generally recognized agamospermous microspecies of Taraxacum sect. Taraxacum, which are characterized by means of eight microsatellite loci, were used to evaluate the ability of four European Taraxacum specialists to identify these microspecies consistently. With two exceptions (and one unclear result) for 125 plants coming from an area extending from Finland to central Europe, the experts identified the microspecies consistently, exclusively on the basis of morphological differences. Another problem studied was within-species variation. The within-species microsatellite variation corresponded to the mutational clone cluster hypothesis, with a single unclear result. Each microspecies consisted of one, more or less dominant, clone and several minority clones, each usually confined to a single plant. A combination of the traditional microspecies identification by experts and the characterization of microspecies by a set of molecular markers opens the field of microtaxonomy to a wider group of researchers.

Natural epigenetic variation contributes to heritable flowering divergence in a widespread asexual dandelion lineage
Wilschut, Rutger ; Oplaat, C. ; Snoek, L.B. ; Kirschner, J. ; Verhoeven, K.J.F. - \ 2016
Molecular Ecology 25 (2016)8. - ISSN 0962-1083 - p. 1759 - 1768.
dna methylation - epigenetic inheritance - apomixis - asexual reproduction - adaptation
Epigenetic variation has been proposed to contribute to the success of asexual plants, either as a contributor to phenotypic plasticity or by enabling transient adaptation via selection on transgenerationally stable, but reversible, epialleles. While recent studies in experimental plant populations have shown the potential for epigenetic mechanisms to contribute to adaptive phenotypes, it remains unknown if heritable variation in ecologically relevant traits is at least partially epigenetically determined in natural populations. Here, we tested the hypothesis that DNA methylation variation contributes to heritable differences in flowering time within a single widespread apomictic clonal lineage of the common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale s. lat.). Apomictic clone members of the same apomictic lineage collected from different field sites showed heritable differences in flowering time, which was correlated with inherited differences in methylation-sensitive AFLP marker profiles. Differences in flowering between apomictic clone members were significantly reduced after in vivo de-methylation using the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor zebularine. This synchronization of flowering times suggests that flowering time divergence within an apomictic lineage was mediated by differences in DNA methylation. While the underlying basis of the methylation polymorphism at functional flowering time-affecting loci remains to be demonstrated, our study shows that epigenetic variation contributes to heritable phenotypic divergence in ecologically relevant traits in natural plant populations. This result also suggests that epigenetic mechanisms can facilitate adaptive divergence within genetically uniform asexual lineages.
Can computer models be used for social learning? A serious game in water management
Wal, Merel M. Van der; Kraker, Joop de; Kroeze, Carolien ; Kirschner, Paul A. ; Valkering, Pieter - \ 2016
Environmental Modelling & Software 75 (2016). - ISSN 1364-8152 - p. 119 - 132.
Serious game - Simulation model - Social learning - Water management

Computer simulation models are increasingly used to support solving complex problems in natural resource management, with social learning as subsidiary goal of the solution process. In this research, a serious game on water management is used where participants receive feedback on consequences of their choices from an Integrated Assessment Meta Model. This study aims to determine if and how social learning takes place and explores the role of the model in social learning. Group discussions were qualitatively analysed to uncover and understand the mechanisms in this process. Results show that social learning took place in 10 of the 12 game sessions. Though model feedback was an important driver for social learning, social learning was driven most by the team's reflection on their perspective. We conclude that using a model can facilitate social learning in a serious-game setting, in particular in combination with reflection on teams' perspectives.

Data from: Natural epigenetic variation contributes to heritable flowering divergence in a widespread asexual dandelion lineage
Wilschut, Rutger ; Oplaat, C. ; Snoek, L.B. ; Kirschner, J. ; Verhoeven, K.J.F. - \ 2015
contemporary evolution - ecological genetics - plant mating systems - epigenetics
Epigenetic variation has been proposed to contribute to the success of asexual plants, either as a contributor to phenotypic plasticity or by enabling transient adaptation via selection on transgenerationally stable, but reversible, epialleles. While recent studies in experimental plant populations have shown the potential for epigenetic mechanisms to contribute to adaptive phenotypes, it remains unknown whether heritable variation in ecologically relevant traits is at least partially epigenetically determined in natural populations. Here, we tested the hypothesis that DNA methylation variation contributes to heritable differences in flowering time within a single widespread apomictic clonal lineage of the common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale s. lat.). Apomictic clone members of the same apomictic lineage collected from different field sites showed heritable differences in flowering time, which was correlated with inherited differences in methylation-sensitive AFLP marker profiles. Differences in flowering between apomictic clone members were significantly reduced after in vivo demethylation using the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor zebularine. This synchronization of flowering times suggests that flowering time divergence within an apomictic lineage was mediated by differences in DNA methylation. While the underlying basis of the methylation polymorphism at functional flowering time-affecting loci remains to be demonstrated, our study shows that epigenetic variation contributes to heritable phenotypic divergence in ecologically relevant traits in natural plant populations. This result also suggests that epigenetic mechanisms can facilitate adaptive divergence within genetically uniform asexual lineages.
Measuring Social Learning in Participatory Approaches to Natural Resource Management
Wal, M.M. van der; Kraker, J. de; Offermans, A. ; Kroeze, C. ; Kirschner, P. ; Ittersum, M.K. van - \ 2014
Environmental Policy and Governance 24 (2014)1. - ISSN 1756-932X - p. 1 - 15.
natuurlijke hulpbronnen - hulpbronnenbeheer - sociaal leren - participatief management - klimaatverandering - governance - natural resources - resource management - social learning - participative management - climatic change - cultural theory - stakeholder participation - climate-change - sustainability - perspectives - framework - dilemmas
The role of social learning as a governance mechanism in natural resource management has been frequently highlighted, but progress in finding evidence for this role and gaining insight into the conditions that promote it are hampered by the lack of operational definitions of social learning and practical methods to measure it. In this article, we present a simple and flexible method to measure social learning, whether it has occurred and to what extent, among stakeholders in natural resource management. The method yields measurements of social learning that are visual, quantitative and qualitative. First, we elaborate our definition of social learning as a convergence of perspectives and outline how stakeholder perspectives in natural resource management can be described with Cultural Theory. Next, we provide a generic description of the method, followed by two examples illustrating its application to the domains of water and land management. Finally, we discuss relative strengths and weaknesses of the method and how it could be applied to improve our understanding of factors that contribute to social learning.
Team learning: building shared mental models
Bossche, P. van den; Gijselaers, W. ; Segers, M. ; Woltjer, G.B. ; Kirschner, P. - \ 2011
Instructional Science 39 (2011)3. - ISSN 0020-4277 - p. 283 - 301.
knowledge convergence - performance - mediation - conflict - diversity - framework - cognition - beliefs - task
To gain insight in the social processes that underlie knowledge sharing in teams, this article questions which team learning behaviors lead to the construction of a shared mental model. Additionally, it explores how the development of shared mental models mediates the relation between team learning behaviors and team effectiveness. Analyses were performed on student-teams engaged in a business simulation game. The measurement of shared mental models was based on cognitive mapping techniques. The results indicate that a team learning perspective provides insight in how people share knowledge. Particularly the team learning behaviors identified as co-construction and constructive conflict are related to the development of shared mental models. In addition, a shared mental model of the task environment in a team leads to improved performance. This underscores the importance of developing shared cognition in teamwork
Models as social learning tools in participatory integrated assessment
Kraker, J. de; Kroeze, C. ; Kirschner, P. - \ 2009
The effect of practical experience on perceptions of assessment authenticity, study approach and learning outcome
Gulikers, J.T.M. ; Kester, L. ; Kirschner, P.A. ; Bastiaens, Th.J. - \ 2008
Learning and Instruction 18 (2008). - ISSN 0959-4752 - p. 172 - 186.
students perceptions - questionnaire - environment - capability - impact
Does authentic assessment or the perception of it affect how students study and learn? Does practical experience affect how assessment authenticity is perceived? And does practical experience influence how an authentic assessment affects student learning? Mixed methods design yielded insight into the answers to these questions. This article presents the results of a study on the relationships between authenticity perceptions of different cohorts of students, who differed in the amount of practical experience, their study approach and their perceived degree of professional skill development. The results showed some salient differences in how freshman- and senior-student groups perceive the same authentic assessment and how this assessment influences their learning. These results suggest possible guidelines for developing and using authentic assessments during a curriculum in which learning and working are intertwined. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Authenticity is in the Eye of the Beholder: Student and Teacher Perceptions of Assessment Authenticity
Gulikers, J.T.M. ; Bastiaens, Th.J. ; Kirschner, P.A. ; Kester, L. - \ 2008
Journal of Vocational Education and Training 60 (2008)4. - ISSN 1363-6820 - p. 401 - 412.
In vocational education and training (VET) in the Netherlands, learning and working are integrated from the start. Authentic assessments are used during competence-based VET curricula to achieve correspondence between learning and working. The premise behind this study is that authenticity is subjective and that perceptions of assessment authenticity influence student learning for the assessments. It examines whether students and teachers differ in their perceptions of the authenticity of various assessment characteristics. Subsequently this study investigates whether freshman and senior students, who differ in their amount of practical experience, differ in their perceptions of assessment authenticity. The main findings were that teachers rated most assessment characteristics as more authentic than students did, while freshman and senior students did not differ in their perception of authenticity. Implications deal with communicating about and developing authentic assessment in the eyes of both students and teachers to stimulate students' professional skills development during a VET curriculum
Cognitive load measurements and stimulated recall interviews for studying the effects of information and communications technology.
Beers, P.J. ; Boshuizen, H.P.A. ; Kirschner, P.A. ; Gijselaers, W. ; Westendorp, J. - \ 2008
Educational Technology Research and Development 56 (2008)3. - ISSN 1042-1629 - p. 309 - 328.
knowledge construction - design - argumentation
Many researchers use information and communications technology (ICT)-tools to augment learning in a great variety of tasks. Their effects are generally measured in terms of intended outcomes. This article argues for the use of additional, more general measures to obtain a more complete impression of the effects of ICT-tools. The first study presented in this article shows why tools should not only be studied in terms of their specific intended outcomes, but also in terms of their effects on working memory, and the cognitive mechanisms needed to achieve the intended outcomes. The second study uses cognitive load measurements and stimulated recall interviews to obtain a more comprehensive view of the effects of learning tools. Results suggest that traditional outcome measures need to be complemented with quantitative and qualitative measures of cognitive processes to substantiate conclusions about intended effects of ICT-tools.
Coercing shared knowledge in collaborative learning environments
Kirschner, P.A. ; Beers, P.J. ; Boshuizen, H.P.A. ; Gijselaers, W. - \ 2008
Computers in Human Behavior 24 (2008)2. - ISSN 0747-5632 - p. 403 - 420.
cognitive load theory
Multidisciplinary teams are used in industry, government, and education for solving complex problems because they allow different perspectives to be brought to bear on a problem and thus enrich the problem space. This, in turn, is expected to allow for rich problem analyses and solutions. However, multidisciplinarity is not always advantageous. Good team solutions require team members to possess a good degree of common ground. To address this, researchers and educators often chose techniques such as collaboration scripts or scenarios to structure collaboration or how ICT-tools are used. They do this by making use of formalisms or constraints to structure conversation and discourse among collaborators with the aim of guiding the exchange of knowledge and information or both. Such techniques and tools have attained good results on cognitive aspects of group learning by focusing on task aspects. However, they have not explicitly addressed the problem of how teams with expertise diversity reach common ground. This article presents the results of a series of experiments that have shown that a tool that is capable of scripting the negotiation of both meaning and standpoint can have very positive effects on achieving common ground.
Defining authentic assessment: five dimensions of authenticity
Gulikers, J.T.M. ; Bastiaens, Th.J. ; Kirschner, P.A. - \ 2007
In: Balancing dilemmas in assessment and learning in contemporary education / Havnes, A., McDowell, L., New York : Routledge - ISBN 9780415955843 - p. 73 - 86.
Student, teacher and practitioner about authentic assessment: paper presented at Onderwijs Research Dagen
Gulikers, J.T.M. ; Bastiaens, Th.J. ; Kirschner, P.A. - \ 2006
The interviewer (Review of the cd-rom The Interviewer)
Gulikers, J.T.M. ; Kirschner, P.A. - \ 2006
British Journal of Educational Technology 37 (2006). - ISSN 0007-1013 - p. 308 - 309.
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