Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Records 1 - 20 / 88

  • help
  • print

    Print search results

  • export

    Export search results

  • alert
    We will mail you new results for this query: q=Koppel
Check title to add to marked list
Advocating a need for suitable breeding approaches to boost integrated pest management : A European perspective
Lamichhane, Jay Ram ; Arseniuk, Edward ; Boonekamp, Piet ; Czembor, Jerzy ; Decroocq, Veronique ; Enjalbert, Jérome ; Finckh, Maria R. ; Korbin, Małgorzata ; Koppel, Mati ; Kudsk, Per ; Mesterhazy, Akos ; Sosnowska, Danuta ; Zimnoch-Guzowska, Ewa ; Messéan, Antoine - \ 2018
Pest Management Science 74 (2018)6. - ISSN 1526-498X - p. 1219 - 1227.
Crop diversification - Decentralization - DUS - Food security - Minor crops - Participatory plant breeding - Seed legislation - Sustainable agriculture
Currently, European farmers do not have access to sufficient numbers and diversity of crop species/varieties. This prevents them from designing cropping systems more resilient to abiotic and biotic stresses. Crop diversification is a key lever to reduce pest (pathogens, animal pests and weeds) pressures at all spatial levels from fields to landscapes. In this context, plant breeding should consist of: (1) increased efforts in the development of new or minor crop varieties to foster diversity in cropping systems, and (2) focus on more resilient varieties showing local adaptation. This new breeding paradigm, called here 'breeding for integrated pest management (IPM)', may boost IPM through the development of cultivars with tolerance or resistance to key pests, with the goal of reducing reliance on conventional pesticides. At the same time, this paradigm has legal and practical implications for future breeding programs, including those targeting sustainable agricultural systems. By putting these issues into the context, this article presents the key outcomes of a questionnaire survey and experts' views expressed during an EU workshop entitled 'Breeding for IPM in sustainable agricultural systems'.
Future research directions to reconcile wind turbine - wildlife interactions
May, R. ; Gill, A.B. ; Koppel, Johann ; Langston, R.H.W. ; Reichenbach, Marc ; Scheidat, M. ; Smallwood, Shawn ; Voigt, C. ; Hueppop, O. ; Portman, Michelle - \ 2017
In: Wind Energy and Wildlife Interactions. - Springer International Publishing - ISBN 9783319512709 - p. 255 - 276.
Future research directions - impacts of wind farms - wildlife - animal movement decisions - mitigation hierarchy
Concurrent with the development of wind energy, research activity on wind energy generation and wildlife has evolved significantly during the last decade. This chapter presents an overview of remaining key knowledge gaps, consequent future research directions and their significance for management and planning for wind energy generation. The impacts of wind farms on wildlife are generally site-, species- and season-specific and related management strategies and practices may differ considerably between countries. These differences acknowledge the need to consider potential wildlife impacts for each wind farm project. Still, the ecological mechanisms guiding species’ responses and potential vulnerability to wind farms can be expected to be fundamental in nature. A more cohesive understanding of the causes, patterns, mechanisms, and consequences of animal movement decisions will thereby facilitate successful mitigation of impacts. This requires planning approaches that implement the mitigation hierarchy effectively to reduce risks to species of concern. At larger geographical scales, population-level and cumulative impacts of multiple wind farms (and other anthropogenic activity) need to be addressed. This requires longitudinal and multiple-site studies to identify species-specific traits that influence risk of mortality, notably from collision with wind turbines, disturbance or barrier effects. In addition, appropriate pre- and post-construction monitoring techniques must be utilized. Predictive modelling to forecast risk, while tackling spatio-temporal variability, can guide the mitigation of wildlife impacts at wind farms.
Data from: How habitat-modifying organisms structure the food web of two coastal ecosystems
Zee, Els M. van der; Angelini, Christine ; Govers, Laura L. ; Christianen, M.J.A. ; Altieri, Andrew H. ; Reijden, K.J. van der; Silliman, Brian R. ; Koppel, Johan van de; Geest, Matthijs van der; Gils, Jan A. van; Veer, Henk W. van der; Piersma, Theunis ; Ruiter, P.C. de; Olff, H. ; Heide, Tjisse van der - \ 2016
food web - non-trophic interactions - foundation species - ecological networks - ecosystem engineering - facilitation
The diversity and structure of ecosystems has been found to depend both on trophic interactions in food webs and on other species interactions such as habitat modification and mutualism that form non-trophic interaction networks. However, quantification of the dependencies between these two main interaction networks has remained elusive. In this study, we assessed how habitat-modifying organisms affect basic food web properties by conducting in-depth empirical investigations of two ecosystems: North American temperate fringing marshes and West African tropical seagrass meadows. Results reveal that habitat-modifying species, through non-trophic facilitation rather than their trophic role, enhance species richness across multiple trophic levels, increase the number of interactions per species (link density), but decrease the realized fraction of all possible links within the food web (connectance). Compared to the trophic role of the most highly connected species, we found this non-trophic effects to be more important for species richness and of more or similar importance for link density and connectance. Our findings demonstrate that food webs can be fundamentally shaped by interactions outside the trophic network, yet intrinsic to the species participating in it. Better integration of non-trophic interactions in food web analyses may therefore strongly contribute to their explanatory and predictive capacity.
How habitat-modifying organisms structure the food web of two coastal ecosystems
Zee, Els M. van der; Angelini, Christine ; Govers, Laura L. ; Christianen, Marjolijn J.A. ; Altieri, Andrew H. ; Reijden, Karin J. van der; Silliman, Brian R. ; Koppel, Johan van de; Geest, Matthijs van der; Gils, Jan A. van; Veer, Henk W. van der; Piersma, Theunis ; Ruiter, Peter C. de; Olff, Han ; Heide, Tjisse van der - \ 2016
Proceedings of the Royal Society. B: Biological Sciences 283 (2016)1826. - ISSN 0962-8452 - 9 p.
Consumer–resource interactions - Ecological networks - Ecosystem engineering - Facilitation - Foundation species - Non-trophic interactions
The diversity and structure of ecosystems has been found to depend both on trophic interactions in food webs and on other species interactions such as habitat modification and mutualism that form non-trophic interaction networks. However, quantification of the dependencies between these two main interaction networks has remained elusive. In this study, we assessed how habitat-modifying organisms affect basic food web properties by conducting in-depth empirical investigations of two ecosystems: North American temperate fringing marshes and West African tropical seagrass meadows. Results reveal that habitat-modifying species, through non-trophic facilitation rather than their trophic role, enhance species richness across multiple trophic levels, increase the number of interactions per species (link density), but decrease the realized fraction of all possible links within the food web (connectance). Compared to the trophic role of the most highly connected species, we found this non-trophic effects to be more important for species richness and of more or similar importance for link density and connectance. Our findings demonstrate that food webs can be fundamentally shaped by interactions outside the trophic network, yet intrinsic to the species participating in it. Better integration of non-trophic interactions in food web analyses may therefore strongly contribute to their explanatory and predictive capacity.
Drought, Mutualism Breakdown, and Landscape-Scale Degradation of Seagrass Beds
Fouw, Jimmy de; Govers, Laura L. ; Koppel, Johan van de; Belzen, Jim van; Dorigo, Wouter ; Sidi Cheikh, Mohammed A. ; Christianen, Marjolijn J.A. ; Reijden, Karin J. van der; Geest, Matthijs van der; Piersma, Theunis ; Smolders, Alfons J.P. ; Olff, Han ; Lamers, Leon P.M. ; Gils, Jan A. van; Heide, Tjisse van der - \ 2016
Current Biology 26 (2016)8. - ISSN 0960-9822 - p. 1051 - 1056.
In many marine ecosystems, biodiversity critically depends on foundation species such as corals and seagrasses that engage in mutualistic interactions [1-3]. Concerns grow that environmental disruption of marine mutualisms exacerbates ecosystem degradation, with breakdown of the obligate coral mutualism ("coral bleaching") being an iconic example [2, 4, 5]. However, as these mutualisms are mostly facultative rather than obligate, it remains unclear whether mutualism breakdown is a common risk in marine ecosystems, and thus a potential accelerator of ecosystem degradation. Here, we provide evidence that drought triggered landscape-scale seagrass degradation and show the consequent failure of a facultative mutualistic feedback between seagrass and sulfide-consuming lucinid bivalves that in turn appeared to exacerbate the observed collapse. Local climate and remote sensing analyses revealed seagrass collapse after a summer with intense low-tide drought stress. Potential analysis - a novel approach to detect feedback-mediated state shifts - revealed two attractors (healthy and degraded states) during the collapse, suggesting that the drought disrupted internal feedbacks to cause abrupt, patch-wise degradation. Field measurements comparing degraded patches that were healthy before the collapse with patches that remained healthy demonstrated that bivalves declined dramatically in degrading patches with associated high sediment sulfide concentrations, confirming the breakdown of the mutualistic seagrass-lucinid feedback. Our findings indicate that drought triggered mutualism breakdown, resulting in toxic sulfide concentrations that aggravated seagrass degradation. We conclude that external disturbances can cause sudden breakdown of facultative marine mutualistic feedbacks. As this may amplify ecosystem degradation, we suggest including mutualisms in marine conservation and restoration approaches.
Kuchende kalveren: (Koppel)kuur op basis van kliniek of toch diagnostiek?
Antonis, A.F.G. ; Koene, M.G.J. - \ 2015
Tijdschrift voor Diergeneeskunde 140 (2015)10. - ISSN 0040-7453 - p. 26 - 31.
Beyond food : A foundation species facilitates its own predator
Aguera Garcia, Antonio ; Koppel, Johan van de; Jansen, J.M. ; Smaal, A.C. ; Bouma, T.J. - \ 2015
Oikos 124 (2015)10. - ISSN 0030-1299 - p. 1367 - 1373.

Facilitation by foundation species can play a critical role in structuring ecological communities. As environmental stress increases, generally more organisms become dependent on the stress buffering provided by foundation species. As such, foundation species may even facilitate their own predators, an interaction that can influence the functioning and structure of the foundation species population and thereby the facilitated organisms. This work presents a case study on the blue mussels and sea stars, where we tested to what extent a foundation species (i.e. blue mussels) may facilitate its own predator (sea star) when exposed to a gradient of environmental stress (hydrodynamic forces). Amelioration of hydrodynamic stress by mussels facilitated sea stars, allowing them to persist on a soft bottom in highly dynamic environment, which would not be possible in the absence of mussels. Moreover, sea stars continue preying on mussels when environmental stress increases. The results suggest that a foundation species may interact with its own predator beyond the role of food source, by ameliorating environmental stress, creating an additional dependence link between the foundation species and the predator, which potentially has major implications for ecosystem structure and stability.

Experimental evidence for inherent Lévy search behaviour in foraging animals
Kölzsch, A. ; Alzate, A. ; Bartumeus, F. ; Jager, M. de; Weerman, E.J. ; Hengeveld, G.M. ; Naguib, M. ; Nolet, B.A. ; Koppel, J. van de - \ 2015
Proceedings of the Royal Society. B: Biological Sciences 282 (2015)1807. - ISSN 0962-8452 - 9 p.
correlated-random-walks - environmental complexity - wandering albatrosses - movement patterns - marine predator - flight - strategies - success - evolve - scale
Recently, Lévy walks have been put forward as a new paradigm for animal search and many cases have been made for its presence in nature. However, it remains debated whether Lévy walks are an inherent behavioural strategy or emerge from the animal reacting to its habitat. Here, we demonstrate signatures of Lévy behaviour in the search movement of mud snails (Hydrobia ulvae) based on a novel, direct assessment of movement properties in an experimental set-up using different food distributions. Our experimental data uncovered clusters of small movement steps alternating with long moves independent of food encounter and landscape complexity. Moreover, size distributions of these clusters followed truncated power laws. These two findings are characteristic signatures of mechanisms underlying inherent Lévy-like movement. Thus, our study provides clear experimental evidence that such multi-scale movement is an inherent behaviour rather than resulting from the animal interacting with its environment.
Processes limiting mussel bed restoration in the Wadden Sea
Paoli, H. de; Koppel, J. van de; Zee, E. van der; Kangeri, A.K. - \ 2015
Journal of Sea Research 103 (2015). - ISSN 1385-1101 - p. 42 - 49.
This paper reports on experimental restoration of mussel beds in the Wadden Sea and the processes that might limit successful restoration of this foundation species (i.e. substrate, predation, hydrodynamics). The importance of substrate, predation, hydrodynamic conditions and location on mussel restoration success was studied using artificially created mussel beds. Experimental beds established on a stable substrate (coir net) were compared with control beds established on sand, at three locations in the Wadden Sea. Their persistence was followed over time. The results revealed a near disappearance of all experimental beds in just over 7 months. Providing a stable substrate did not improve mussel survival. Predation could not explain the disappearance of the beds, as the maximal predation rate by birds was found to be insufficient to have a significant effect on mussel cover. Differences in wave conditions alone could also not explain the variation in decline of mussel cover between the locations. However, the gradual disappearance of mussels from the seaward side of the bed strongly suggested that hydrodynamic conditions (i.e. combined effects of waves and current) played an important role in the poor persistence of the artificial beds. Our results highlight the fact that restoration of mussel beds in dynamic areas cannot simply be implemented bymussel transplantation, particularly if additional measures to prevent wave losses are not taken, even when artificial substrate is provided to facilitate mussel adhesion.
Water en natuur : een mooi koppel
Hattum, T. van; Kwakernaak, C. ; Cleef, R. van - \ 2015
H2O online (2015)15-3-2015.
waterbeleid - veiligheid - natuurbeleid - watervoorziening - wateropslag - natura 2000 - klimaatverandering - water policy - safety - nature conservation policy - water supply - water storage - climatic change
Nederland staat voor forse opgaven op het gebied van waterveiligheid en zoetwatervoorziening. Er worden de komende jaren miljarden euro’s geïnvesteerd om die opgaven te realiseren. Juist nu liggen er dan ook grote kansen voor slimme combinaties van water- en natuuropgaven. Wat is er voor nodig om die kansen maximaal te benutten? In opdracht van het Ministerie van Economische Zaken deed Alterra hier onderzoek naar. Dit artikel vat de belangrijkste bevindingen en aanbevelingen uit deze studie samen
Pattern formation at multiple spatial scales drives the resilience of mussel bed ecosystems
Liu, Q. ; Herman, P.M.J. ; Mooij, W.M. ; Huisman, J. ; Scheffer, M. ; Olff, H. ; Koppel, J. van de - \ 2014
Nature Communications 5 (2014). - ISSN 2041-1723
self-organization - trade-offs - dynamics - systems - model
Self-organized complexity at multiple spatial scales is a distinctive characteristic of biological systems. Yet, little is known about how different self-organizing processes operating at different spatial scales interact to determine ecosystem functioning. Here we show that the interplay between self-organizing processes at individual and ecosystem level is a key determinant of the functioning and resilience of mussel beds. In mussel beds, self-organization generates spatial patterns at two characteristic spatial scales: small-scale net-shaped patterns due to behavioural aggregation of individuals, and large-scale banded patterns due to the interplay of between-mussel facilitation and resource depletion. Model analysis reveals that the interaction between these behavioural and ecosystem-level mechanisms increases mussel bed resilience, enables persistence under deteriorating conditions and makes them less prone to catastrophic collapse. Our analysis highlights that interactions between different forms of self-organization at multiple spatial scales may enhance the intrinsic ability of ecosystems to withstand both natural and human-induced disturbances.
Water en natuur: een mooi koppel! : onderzoek naar de succesfactoren, belemmeringen en kansen voor het meekoppelen van water- en natuuropgaven
Hattum, T. van; Kwakernaak, C. ; Tol-Leenders, T.P. van; Roelsma, J. ; Broekmeyer, M.E.A. ; Schmidt, A.M. ; Hartgers, E.M. ; Nysingh, S.L. - \ 2014
Wageningen : Alterra, Wageningen-UR (Alterra-rapport 2533) - 69
waterbeleid - veiligheid - natuurbeleid - watervoorziening - wateropslag - natura 2000 - klimaatverandering - gebiedsontwikkeling - regionale planning - water policy - safety - nature conservation policy - water supply - water storage - climatic change - area development - regional planning
Nederland staat de komende jaren voor forse opgaven op het gebied van waterveiligheid, zoetwatervoorziening, waterkwaliteit en natuur. Daarbij is het belangrijk bij deze investeringen ambities te laten ‘meekoppelen’ om zo meer maatschappelijk rendement te halen. In opdracht van het ministerie van Economische Zaken heeft Alterra een onderzoek uitgevoerd naar de succesfactoren en belemmeringen van het mee-koppelen van water- en natuuropgaven. Op basis van interviews met diverse vertegenwoordigers van rijksoverheid, provincies, waterschappen, bedrijfsleven en natuurorganisaties zijn de belangrijkste succesfactoren en belemmeringen in beeld gebracht, die zijn vertaald naar aanbevelingen om het meekoppelen van water- en natuuropgaven te stimuleren.
Uitheemse slangen in Nederland : een analyse van de kans op introductie, vestiging, uitbreiding en schade
Bugter, R.J.F. ; Koppel, S. ; Creemers, R.C.M. ; Griffioen, A.J. ; Ottburg, F.G.W.A. - \ 2014
Wageningen : Alterra, Wageningen-UR (RAVON-rapport 2013.112) - 122
slangen (reptielen) - risicoanalyse - invasieve exoten - nadelige gevolgen - inventarisaties - nederland - snakes - risk analysis - invasive alien species - adverse effects - inventories - netherlands
In opdracht van het Bureau Risicobeoordeling en Onderzoeksprogrammering van de Nederlandse Voedsel en Waren Autoriteit (NVWA) is door RAVON, Natuurbalans-Limes Divergens en Alterra een beoordeling van het risico van vestiging van uitheemse slangen in Nederland uitgevoerd. Dit risico hangt af van de kans op introductie, de kans dat geïntroduceerde exemplaren een duurzame populatie opbouwen, de kans dat die populatie zich uit kan breiden en de kans op ecologische, economische en sociale schade. Na een eerste screening zijn de risico’s voor elf soorten en soortgroepen beoordeeld. Voor vier soorten / soortgroepen werd het risico als substantieel beoordeeld, voor de andere soorten of soortgroepen was dit matig, mogelijk aanwezig of verwaarloosbaar. De grootste risicofactor is de introductie van een aantal exemplaren van een soort ineens.
Risk analysis of exotic fish species included in the Dutch Fisheries Act and their hybrids
Schiphouwer, M.E. ; Kessel, N. van; Matthews, J. ; Leuven, R.S.E.W. ; Koppel, S. ; Kranenbarg, J. ; Haenen, O.L.M. ; Lenders, H.J.R. ; Nagelkerke, L.A.J. ; Velde, G. van der; Crombaghs, B. ; Zollinger, R. - \ 2014
Nijmegen : Nederlands Expertise Centrum Exoten (Report 2013.068) - 207
vissen - fauna - verspreiding - risicobeheersing - invasieve exoten - inventarisaties - fishes - dispersal - risk management - invasive alien species - inventories
In dit rapport worden de risico’s geanalyseerd van exotische vissoorten die zijn opgenomen in de Visserijwet en hun hybriden. De volgende soorten en één specifieke hybride zijn in de analyse meegenomen: beekridder (Salvelinus alpinus); roofblei (Leuciscus aspius); karper (Cyprinus carpio); Amerikaanse hondsvis (Umbra pygmaea); graskarper (Ctenopharyngodon idella); hybride ‘kruiskarper’ (Cyprinus carpio X Carassius spp.); snoekbaars (Sander lucioperca); giebel (Carassius gibelio) en kleine marene (Coregonus albula). Hoewel zeeforel (Salmo trutta trutta) was opgenomen in de initiële selectie van exotische soorten, is in consensus met experts besloten deze soort als inheems te beschouwen. Op basis van dit rapport worden de volgende maatregelen aanbevolen: - Het uitzetten van exoten, met name karper, giebel, snoekbaars, graskarper en vruchtbare hybriden (kruiskarper), moet gestopt of gereguleerd worden om verdere verspreiding en nieuwe introducties te voorkomen. - Het screenen van nationale en international vistransporten en maatregelen te nemen om de verspreiding van ziekten en andere meeliftende exoten te voorkomen.
How superdiffusion gets arrested: ecological encounters explain shift from Lévy to Brownian movement
Jager, M. de; Bartumeus, F. ; Kölzsch, A. ; Weissing, F.J. ; Hengeveld, G.M. ; Nolet, B.A. ; Herman, P.M.J. ; Koppel, J. van de - \ 2014
Proceedings of the Royal Society. B: Biological Sciences 281 (2014)1774. - ISSN 0962-8452 - 8 p.
power-law distributions - flight search patterns - environmental complexity - walks evolve - predators - dynamics - animals - mussels - success
Ecological theory uses Brownian motion as a default template for describing ecological movement, despite limited mechanistic underpinning. The generality of Brownian motion has recently been challenged by empirical studies that highlight alternative movement patterns of animals, especially when foraging in resource-poor environments. Yet, empirical studies reveal animals moving in a Brownian fashion when resources are abundant. We demonstrate that Einstein's original theory of collision-induced Brownian motion in physics provides a parsimonious, mechanistic explanation for these observations. Here, Brownian motion results from frequent encounters between organisms in dense environments. In density-controlled experiments, movement patterns of mussels shifted from Lévy towards Brownian motion with increasing density. When the analysis was restricted to moves not truncated by encounters, this shift did not occur. Using a theoretical argument, we explain that any movement pattern approximates Brownian motion at high-resource densities, provided that movement is interrupted upon encounters. Hence, the observed shift to Brownian motion does not indicate a density-dependent change in movement strategy but rather results from frequent collisions. Our results emphasize the need for a more mechanistic use of Brownian motion in ecology, highlighting that especially in rich environments, Brownian motion emerges from ecological interactions, rather than being a default movement pattern
Mogelijkmakers : Bram Bos: technische verduurzaming, integraal aanpakken
Bos, A.P. - \ 2013
YouTube
dierhouderij - duurzame veehouderij - duurzaamheid (sustainability) - innovaties - ondernemerschap - animal husbandry - sustainable animal husbandry - sustainability - innovations - entrepreneurship
Mogelijkmaker Het Nieuwe Veehouden Bram Bos, Wageningen Livestock Research, vertelt over technische verduurzaming. Tips uit zijn verhaal: Plaats technische verduurzaming in bredere context; Koppel vernieuwing aan belang andere partijen; Zoek bondgenoten voor ondersteuning.
Varkenshouders zien snel kans op staartbijten
Camerlink, Irene ; Duijvesteijn, Naomi ; Reimert, Inonge ; Ursinus, Nanda - \ 2013
Praktische varkenshouders zijn goed in staat om al in een vroegtijdig stadium te onderkennen of er in een koppel varkens staartbijten zal optreden. Varkenshouders zien snel kans op staartbijten Dit is een van de belangrijke conclusies van een interactieve masterclass 'Zicht op staartbijten', welke afgelopen dinsdag werd gehouden op Varken Innovatie Centrum Sterksel. De masterclass is een onderdeel van vier onderzoeksprojecten van Wageningen UR met als thema hoe varkens beter kunnen leven in groepen. Er waren ongeveer 60 deelnemers, waarvan ongeveer 20 varkenshouders. De rest waren bedrijfsadviseurs, dierenartsen, onderzoekers, vertegenwoordigers van de overheid en leden van de werkgroep Krulstaart. Er werden verschillende filmpjes vertoond met varkens in een groep. "Het was verbazend om te zien hoe snel varkenshouders al in een vroeg stadium onderkennen of het mis gaat met staartbijten. Zij zien snel of er onrust is in het hok en weten ook terdege waarom het mis zal gaan", zegt projectleider Irene Camerlink van Wageningen UR. Voor de deelnemers was het duidelijk dat er op termijn voor de varkenshouder een verbod op het couperen van staarten zal komen. De maatschappelijke denkwijze is wat dat betreft niet meer terug te draaien. "Voor de varkenshouder zijn er geen voordelen aan, alleen maar risico's. De instelling van de ondernemer of hij er nu al bewust mee aan de slag gaat is essentieel voor de kans op succes", aldus Camerlink. De basiszaken als gezondheid, klimaat en voeding moeten op orde zijn. Afleidingsmateriaal in de hokken is van secundair belang.
Combining Levy walks with path exploitation rules, and exploration of optimal exploration- exploitation strategies
Hengeveld, G.M. ; Koelzsch, A. ; Koppel, J. van de; Naguib, M. ; Nolet, B.A. - \ 2013
Hibernation site requirements of bats in man-made hibernacula in a spatial context
Boer, W.F. de; Koppel, S. ; Knegt, H.J. de; Dekker, J.J.A. - \ 2013
Ecological Applications 23 (2013)2. - ISSN 1051-0761 - p. 502 - 514.
niche factor-analysis - habitat-suitability - selection - scale - landscape - temperatures - chiroptera - myotis
Bat hibernacula selection depends on various spatial and nonspatial variables that differ widely between sites. However, previous studies have focused mainly on nonspatial variables. This research investigated factors that determined the abundance and species richness of hibernating bats in hibernation objects of the New Dutch Waterline, The Netherlands, and determined the relevant scales over which spatial factors operate using regression techniques and ecological-niche factor analyses. The effects of 32 predictor variables on several response variables, i.e., the total bat abundance, species richness, and abundance and presence of bat species, were investigated. Predictor variables were classified as internal variables (e.g., building size, climatic conditions, and human access) or external variables (e.g., ground and vegetation cover and land cover type) that were measured at different spatial scales to study the influence of the spatial context. The internal building variables (mainly the size of hibernacula and the number of hiding possibilities) affected the hibernating bat abundance and species richness. Climatic variables, such as changes in temperature and humidity, were less important. The hibernation site suitability was also influenced by spatial variables at a variety of scales, thereby indicating the importance of scale- dependent species–environment relationships. The absence of human use and public access enhanced hibernation site suitability, but the internal size-related variables had the greatest positive effect on hibernation site suitability. These results demonstrate the importance of considering the different spatial scales of the surrounding landscape to better understand habitat selection, and they offer directives to managers to optimize objects for hibernating bats and to improve management and bat conservation. The analyses have wider applications to other wildlife–habitat studies.
Soil and freshwater and marine sediment food webs: their structure and function
Krumins, J.A. ; Oevelen, D. van; Bezemer, T.M. ; Deyn, G.B. de; Hol, W.H.G. ; Donk, E. van; Boer, W. de; Ruiter, P.C. de; Middelburg, J.J. ; Monroy, F. ; Soetaert, K. ; Thébault, E. ; Koppel, J. van de; Veen, J.A. van; Viketoft, M. ; Putten, W.H. van der - \ 2013
Bioscience 63 (2013)1. - ISSN 0006-3568 - p. 35 - 42.
global carbon-cycle - terrestrial ecosystems - real ecosystems - climate-change - biodiversity - stability - communities - limitation - patterns - sequestration
The food webs of terrestrial soils and of freshwater and marine sediments depend on adjacent aboveground or pelagic ecosystems for organic matter input that provides nutrients and energy. There are important similarities in the flow of organic matter through these food webs and how this flow feeds back to primary production. In both soils and sediments, trophic interactions occur in a cycle in which consumers stimulate nutrient cycling such that mineralized resources are made available to the primary producers. However, aquatic sediments and terrestrial soils differ greatly in the connectivity between the production and the consumption of organic matter. Terrestrial soils and shallow aquatic sediments can receive organic matter within hours of photosynthesis when roots leak carbon, whereas deep oceanic sediments receive organic matter possibly months after carbon assimilation by phytoplankton. This comparison has implications for the capacity of soils and sediments to affect the global carbon balance.
Check title to add to marked list
<< previous | next >>

Show 20 50 100 records per page

 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.