Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Validation of biomarkers of food intake-critical assessment of candidate biomarkers
Dragsted, Lars O. ; Gao, Qinfeng ; Scalbert, Augustin ; Vergères, Guy ; Kolehmainen, Marjukka ; Manach, Claudine ; Brennan, Lorraine ; Afman, L.A. ; Wishart, David S. ; Lacueva, Cristina Andres ; Garcia-Aloy, Mar ; Verhagen, H. ; Feskens, E.J.M. ; Feskens, E.J.M. ; Praticò, Giulia - \ 2018
Genes & Nutrition 13 (2018). - ISSN 1555-8932
Biomarkers of food intake (BFIs) are a promising tool for limiting misclassification in nutrition research where more subjective dietary assessment instruments are used. They may also be used to assess compliance to dietary guidelines or to a dietary intervention. Biomarkers therefore hold promise for direct and objective measurement of food intake. However, the number of comprehensively validated biomarkers of food intake is limited to just a few. Many new candidate biomarkers emerge from metabolic profiling studies and from advances in food chemistry. Furthermore, candidate food intake biomarkers may also be identified based on extensive literature reviews such as described in the guidelines for Biomarker of Food Intake Reviews (BFIRev). To systematically and critically assess the validity of candidate biomarkers of food intake, it is necessary to outline and streamline an optimal and reproducible validation process. A consensus-based procedure was used to provide and evaluate a set of the most important criteria for systematic validation of BFIs. As a result, a validation procedure was developed including eight criteria, plausibility, dose-response, time-response, robustness, reliability, stability, analytical performance, and inter-laboratory reproducibility. The validation has a dual purpose: (1) to estimate the current level of validation of candidate biomarkers of food intake based on an objective and systematic approach and (2) to pinpoint which additional studies are needed to provide full validation of each candidate biomarker of food intake. This position paper on biomarker of food intake validation outlines the second step of the BFIRev procedure but may also be used as such for validation of new candidate biomarkers identified, e.g., in food metabolomic studies.
Guidelines for Biomarker of Food Intake Reviews (BFIRev) : How to conduct an extensive literature search for biomarker of food intake discovery
Praticò, Giulia ; Gao, Qian ; Scalbert, Augustin ; Vergères, Guy ; Kolehmainen, Marjukka ; Manach, Claudine ; Brennan, Lorraine ; Pedapati, Sri Harsha ; Afman, Lydia A. ; Wishart, David S. ; Vázquez-Fresno, Rosa ; Lacueva, Cristina Andres ; Garcia-Aloy, Mar ; Verhagen, Hans ; Feskens, Edith J.M. ; Dragsted, Lars O. - \ 2018
Genes & Nutrition 13 (2018)1. - ISSN 1555-8932
Biomarkers - Food exposure markers - Literature search methodology - Metabolomics - Systematic review
Identification of new biomarkers of food and nutrient intake has developed fast over the past two decades and could potentially provide important new tools for compliance monitoring and dietary intake assessment in nutrition and health science. In recent years, metabolomics has played an important role in identifying a large number of putative biomarkers of food intake (BFIs). However, the large body of scientific literature on potential BFIs outside the metabolomics area should also be taken into account. In particular, we believe that extensive literature reviews should be conducted and that the quality of all suggested biomarkers should be systematically evaluated. In order to cover the literature on BFIs in the most appropriate and consistent manner, there is a need for appropriate guidelines on this topic. These guidelines should build upon guidelines in related areas of science while targeting the special needs of biomarker methodology. This document provides a guideline for conducting an extensive literature search on BFIs, which will provide the basis to systematically validate BFIs. This procedure will help to prioritize future work on the identification of new potential biomarkers and on validating these as well as other biomarker candidates, thereby providing better tools for future studies in nutrition and health.
A scheme for a flexible classification of dietary and health biomarkers
Gao, Qian ; Praticò, G. ; Scalbert, A. ; Vergères, Guy ; Kolehmainen, M. ; Manach, Claudine ; Brennan, L. ; Afman, L.A. ; Wishart, D.S. ; Andres-Lacueva, Cristina ; Garcia-Aloy, M. ; Verhagen, H. ; Feskens, E.J.M. ; Dragsted, L.O. - \ 2017
Genes & Nutrition 12 (2017). - ISSN 1555-8932
Biomarkers are an efficient means to examine intakes or exposures and their biological effects and to assess system susceptibility. Aided by novel profiling technologies, the biomarker research field is undergoing rapid development and new putative biomarkers are continuously emerging in the scientific literature. However, the existing concepts for classification of biomarkers in the dietary and health area may be ambiguous, leading to uncertainty about their application. In order to better understand the potential of biomarkers and to communicate their use and application, it is imperative to have a solid scheme for biomarker classification that will provide a well-defined ontology for the field. In this manuscript, we provide an improved scheme for biomarker classification based on their intended use rather than the technology or outcomes (six subclasses are suggested: food compound intake biomarkers (FCIBs), food or food component intake biomarkers (FIBs), dietary pattern biomarkers (DPBs), food compound status biomarkers (FCSBs), effect biomarkers, physiological or health state biomarkers). The application of this scheme is described in detail for the dietary and health area and is compared with previous biomarker classification for this field of research.
Dietary and health biomarkers-time for an update
Dragsted, L.O. ; Gao Qizian, ; Praticò, G. ; Manach, Claudine ; Wishart, D.S. ; Scalbert, A. ; Feskens, E.J.M. - \ 2017
Genes & Nutrition 12 (2017)24. - ISSN 1555-8932 - 7 p.
In the dietary and health research area, biomarkers are extensively used for multiple purposes. These include biomarkers of dietary intake and nutrient status, biomarkers used to measure the biological effects of specific dietary components, and biomarkers to assess the effects of diet on health. The implementation of biomarkers in nutritional research will be important to improve measurements of dietary intake, exposure to specific dietary components, and of compliance to dietary interventions. Biomarkers could also help with improved characterization of nutritional status in study volunteers and to provide much mechanistic insight into the effects of food components and diets. Although hundreds of papers in nutrition are published annually, there is no current ontology for the area, no generally accepted classification terminology for biomarkers in nutrition and health, no systematic validation scheme for these biomarker classes, and no recent systematic review of all proposed biomarkers for food intake. While advanced databases exist for the human and food metabolomes, additional tools are needed to curate and evaluate current data on dietary and health biomarkers. The Food Biomarkers Alliance (FoodBAll) under the Joint Programming Initiative—A Healthy Diet for a Healthy Life (JPI-HDHL)—is aimed at meeting some of these challenges, identifying new dietary biomarkers, and producing new databases and review papers on biomarkers for nutritional research. This current paper outlines the needs and serves as an introduction to this thematic issue of Genes & Nutrition on dietary and health biomarkers.
Nutrition for the ageing brain: Towards evidence for an optimal diet
Vauzour, David ; Camprubi-Robles, Maria ; Miquel-Kergoat, Sophie ; Andres-Lacueva, Cristina ; Bánáti, Diána ; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale ; Bowman, Gene L. ; Caberlotto, Laura ; Clarke, Robert ; Hogervorst, Eef ; Kiliaan, Amanda J. ; Lucca, Ugo ; Manach, Claudine ; Minihane, Anne-Marie ; Mitchell, Ellen Siobhan ; Perneczky, Robert ; Perry, Hugh ; Roussel, Anne-Marie ; Schuermans, Jeroen ; Sijben, John ; Spencer, Jeremy P.E. ; Thuret, Sandrine ; De Rest, Ondine Van; Vandewoude, Maurits ; Wesnes, Keith ; Williams, Robert J. ; Williams, Robin S.B. ; Ramirez, Maria - \ 2017
Ageing Research Reviews 35 (2017). - ISSN 1568-1637 - p. 222 - 240.
As people age they become increasingly susceptible to chronic and extremely debilitating brain diseases. The precise cause of the neuronal degeneration underlying these disorders, and indeed normal brain ageing remains however elusive. Considering the limits of existing preventive methods, there is a desire to develop effective and safe strategies. Growing preclinical and clinical research in healthy individuals or at the early stage of cognitive decline has demonstrated the beneficial impact of nutrition on cognitive functions. The present review is the most recent in a series produced by the Nutrition and Mental Performance Task Force under the auspice of the International Life Sciences Institute Europe (ILSI Europe). The latest scientific advances specific to how dietary nutrients and non-nutrient may affect cognitive ageing are presented. Furthermore, several key points related to mechanisms contributing to brain ageing, pathological conditions affecting brain function, and brain biomarkers are also discussed. Overall, findings are inconsistent and fragmented and more research is warranted to determine the underlying mechanisms and to establish dose-response relationships for optimal brain maintenance in different population subgroups. Such approaches are likely to provide the necessary evidence to develop research portfolios that will inform about new dietary recommendations on how to prevent cognitive decline.
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