Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Methane budget estimates in Finland from the CarbonTracker Europe-CH4 data assimilation system
Tsuruta, Aki ; Aalto, Tuula ; Backman, Leif ; Krol, Maarten C. ; Peters, Wouter ; Lienert, Sebastian ; Joos, Fortunat ; Miller, Paul A. ; Zhang, Wenxin ; Laurila, Tuomas ; Hatakka, Juha ; Leskinen, Ari ; Lehtinen, Kari E.J. ; Peltola, Olli ; Vesala, Timo ; Levula, Janne ; Dlugokencky, Ed ; Heimann, Martin ; Kozlova, Elena ; Aurela, Mika ; Lohila, Annalea ; Kauhaniemi, Mari ; Gomez-Pelaez, Angel J. - \ 2019
Tellus Series B: Chemical and Physical Meteorology (2019). - ISSN 0280-6509 - 21 p.
atmospheric CH - CH flux - data assimilation - Finland - flux estimation

We estimated the CH4 budget in Finland for 2004–2014 using the CTE-CH4 data assimilation system with an extended atmospheric CH4 observation network of seven sites from Finland to surrounding regions (Hyytiälä, Kjølnes, Kumpula, Pallas, Puijo, Sodankylä, and Utö). The estimated average annual total emission for Finland is 0.6 ± 0.5 Tg CH4 yr−1. Sensitivity experiments show that the posterior biospheric emission estimates for Finland are between 0.3 and 0.9 Tg CH4 yr−1, which lies between the LPX-Bern-DYPTOP (0.2 Tg CH4 yr−1) and LPJG-WHyMe (2.2 Tg CH4 yr−1) process-based model estimates. For anthropogenic emissions, we found that the EDGAR v4.2 FT2010 inventory (0.4 Tg CH4 yr−1) is likely to overestimate emissions in southernmost Finland, but the extent of overestimation and possible relocation of emissions are difficult to derive from the current observation network. The posterior emission estimates were especially reliant on prior information in central Finland. However, based on analysis of posterior atmospheric CH4, we found that the anthropogenic emission distribution based on a national inventory is more reliable than the one based on EDGAR v4.2 FT2010. The contribution of total emissions in Finland to global total emissions is only about 0.13%, and the derived total emissions in Finland showed no trend during 2004–2014. The model using optimized emissions was able to reproduce observed atmospheric CH4 at the sites in Finland and surrounding regions fairly well (correlation > 0.75, bias < ± ppb), supporting adequacy of the observations to be used in atmospheric inversion studies. In addition to global budget estimates, we found that CTE-CH4 is also applicable for regional budget estimates, where small scale (1x1 in this case) optimization is possible with a dense observation network.

The Glycaemic Index-Food-Frequency Questionnaire: Development and Validation of a Food Frequency Questionnaire Designed to Estimate the Dietary Intake of Glycaemic Index and Glycaemic Load : An Effort by the PREVIEW Consortium
Brouwer, E.M. ; Berendsen, A.M. ; Sluik, D. ; Wiel, A.M. van de; Raben, Anne ; Vries, J.H.M. de; Brand-Miller, Jennie ; Feskens, E.J.M. - \ 2019
Nutrients 11 (2019)1. - ISSN 2072-6643
Dietary glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) are indices used to quantify the effect of carbohydrate quality and quantity on postprandial glycaemia. GI/GL-health associations are widely studied but data on the validity of integrated GI/GL measurements are scarce. We evaluated the performance of a food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) specifically developed to assess GI/GL. In total, 263 Dutch men and 212 women (aged 55 ± 11 years) completed a 58-item GI-FFQ, an 183-item general-FFQ and a 2-day 24 h-recall and donated blood for glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) determination. The level of agreement between these methods was evaluated by (1) cross-classification, (2) correlations and (3) Bland and Altman plots. The three dietary assessment methods provided comparable mean intake estimates for total carbohydrates (range: 214–237 g/day), mono/disaccharides (100–107 g/day), polysaccharides (114–132 g/day), as well as bread, breakfast cereals, potatoes, pasta, rice, fruit, dairy, cakes/cookies and sweets. Mean (±SD) GI estimates were also comparable between the GI-FFQ (54 ± 3), general-FFQ (53 ± 4) and 24 h-recalls (53 ± 5). Mean (±SD) GI-FFQ GL (117 ± 37) was slightly lower than the general-FFQ GL (126 ± 38) and 24 h-recalls GL (127 ± 37). Classification of GI in quartiles was identical for the GI-FFQ and general-FFQ for 43% of the population (r = 0.58) and with 24 h-recalls for 35% of the population (de-attenuated r = 0.64). For GL, this was 48% (r = 0.65) and 44% (de-attenuated r = 0.74). Correlations between GI and HbA1c were low (r = −0.09 for GI-FFQ, r = −0.04 for general-FFQ and r = 0.07 for 24 h-recalls). In conclusion, compared to a general-FFQ and 24 h-recalls, the GI-FFQ showed a moderate to good relative validity for carbohydrates, carbohydrate-rich foods and GI/GL. No metric predicted HbA1c.
Embracing 3D Complexity in Leaf Carbon–Water Exchange
Earles, J.M. ; Buckley, Thomas N. ; Brodersen, Craig R. ; Busch, Florian A. ; Cano, F.J. ; Choat, Brendan ; Evans, John R. ; Farquhar, Graham D. ; Harwood, Richard ; Huynh, Minh ; John, Grace P. ; Miller, Megan L. ; Rockwell, Fulton E. ; Sack, Lawren ; Scoffoni, Christine ; Struik, Paul C. ; Wu, Alex ; Yin, Xinyou ; Barbour, Margaret M. - \ 2019
Trends in Plant Science 24 (2019)1. - ISSN 1360-1385 - p. 15 - 24.
3D - leaf anatomy - leaf hydraulic conductance - mesophyll conductance - photosynthesis

Leaves are a nexus for the exchange of water, carbon, and energy between terrestrial plants and the atmosphere. Research in recent decades has highlighted the critical importance of the underlying biophysical and anatomical determinants of CO2 and H2O transport, but a quantitative understanding of how detailed 3D leaf anatomy mediates within-leaf transport has been hindered by the lack of a consensus framework for analyzing or simulating transport and its spatial and temporal dynamics realistically, and by the difficulty of measuring within-leaf transport at the appropriate scales. We discuss how recent technological advancements now make a spatially explicit 3D leaf analysis possible, through new imaging and modeling tools that will allow us to address long-standing questions related to plant carbon–water exchange.

Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development (BOND): Vitamin B-12 Review
Allen, L.H. ; Miller, J. ; Groot, C.P.G.M. de; Rosenberg, I.H. ; Smith, A.D. ; Refsum, H. ; Raiten, D.J. - \ 2018
The Journal of Nutrition 148 (2018)suppl. 4. - ISSN 0022-3166 - p. 1995S - 2027S.
This report on vitamin B-12 (B12) is part of the Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development (BOND) Project, which provides state-of-the art information and advice on the selection, use, and interpretation of biomarkers of nutrient exposure, status, and function. As with the other 5 reports in this series, which focused on iodine, folate, zinc, iron, and vitamin A, this B12 report was developed with the assistance of an expert panel (BOND B12 EP) and other experts who provided information during a consultation. The experts reviewed the existing literature in depth in order to consolidate existing relevant information on the biology of B12, including known and possible effects of insufficiency, and available and potential biomarkers of status. Unlike the situation for the other 5 nutrients reviewed during the BOND project, there has been relatively little previous attention paid to B12 status and its biomarkers, so this report is a landmark in terms of the consolidation and interpretation of the available information on B12 nutrition. Historically, most focus has been on diagnosis and treatment of clinical symptoms of B12 deficiency, which result primarily from pernicious anemia or strict vegetarianism. More recently, we have become aware of the high prevalence of B12 insufficiency in populations consuming low amounts of animal-source foods, which can be detected with ≥1 serum biomarker but presents the new challenge of identifying functional consequences that may require public health interventions.
Cognitive and affective predictors of risks from wolves
Landon, A. ; Miller, C. ; Vaske, J.J. ; Jacobs, M.H. ; Williams, B. - \ 2018
Cognitive and affective predictors of risks from wolves
Landon, A. ; Miller, C. ; Vaske, J.J. ; Jacobs, M.H. - \ 2018
Biotransformation and bioactivation reactions – 2017 literature highlights
Khojasteh, S.C. ; Miller, Grover P. ; Mitra, Kaushik ; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M. - \ 2018
Drug Metabolism Reviews 50 (2018)3. - ISSN 0360-2532 - p. 221 - 255.

This annual review is the third one to highlight recent advances in the study and assessment of biotransformations and bioactivations (Table 1). We followed the same format as the previous years with selection and authoring each section (see Baillie et al. 2016; Khojasteh et al. 2017). We acknowledge that many universities no longer train students in mechanistic biotransformation studies reflecting a decline in the investment for those efforts by public funded granting institutions. We hope this work serves as a resource to appreciate the knowledge gained each year to understand and hopefully anticipate toxicological outcomes dependent on biotransformations and bioactivations. This effort itself also continues to evolve. I am pleased that Drs. Rietjens and Miller have again contributed to this annual review. We would like to welcome Kaushik Mitra as an author for this year’s issue, and we thank Deepak Dalvie for his contributions to last year’s edition. We have intentionally maintained a balance of authors such that two come from an academic setting and two come from industry. As always, please drop us a note if you find this review helpful. We would be pleased to hear your opinions of our commentary, and we extend an invitation to anyone who would like to contribute to a future edition of this review.

PREVIEW study—Influence of a behavior modification intervention (PREMIT) in over 2300 people with pre-diabetes : Intention, self-efficacy and outcome expectancies during the early phase of a lifestyle intervention
Huttunen-Lenz, Maija ; Hansen, Sylvia ; Christensen, Pia ; Larsen, Thomas Meinert ; Sandø-Pedersen, Finn ; Drummen, Mathijs ; Adam, Tanja C. ; Macdonald, Ian A. ; Taylor, Moira A. ; Martinez, J.A. ; Navas-Carretero, Santiago ; Handjiev, Svetoslav ; Poppitt, Sally D. ; Silvestre, Marta P. ; Fogelholm, Mikael ; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H. ; Brand-Miller, Jennie ; Berendsen, Agnes A.M. ; Raben, Anne ; Schlicht, Wolfgang - \ 2018
Psychology Research and Behavior Management 11 (2018). - ISSN 1179-1578 - p. 383 - 394.
Cognition - Diabetes mellitus - Goals - Habits - Weight loss

Purpose: Onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is often gradual and preceded by impaired glucose homeostasis. Lifestyle interventions including weight loss and physical activity may reduce the risk of developing T2D, but adherence to a lifestyle change is challenging. As part of an international T2D prevention trial (PREVIEW), a behavior change intervention supported participants in achieving a healthier diet and physically active lifestyle. Here, our aim was to explore the influence of this behavioral program (PREMIT) on social-cognitive variables during an 8-week weight loss phase. Methods: PREVIEW consisted of an initial weight loss, Phase I, followed by a weight-maintenance, Phase II, for those achieving the 8-week weight loss target of ≥ 8% from initial bodyweight. Overweight and obese (BMI ≥25 kg/m2) individuals aged 25 to 70 years with confirmed pre-diabetes were enrolled. Uni-and multivariate statistical methods were deployed to explore differences in intentions, self-efficacy, and outcome expectancies between those who achieved the target weight loss (“achievers”) and those who did not (“non-achievers”). Results: At the beginning of Phase I, no significant differences in intentions, self-efficacy and outcome expectancies between “achievers” (1,857) and “non-achievers” (163) were found. “Non-achievers” tended to be younger, live with child/ren, and attended the PREMIT sessions less frequently. At the end of Phase I, “achievers” reported higher intentions (healthy eating χ2 (1)=2.57; P <0.008, exercising χ2 (1)=0.66; P <0.008), self-efficacy (F(2; 1970)=10.27, P <0.005), and were more positive about the expected outcomes (F(4; 1968)=11.22, P <0.005). Conclusion: Although statistically significant, effect sizes observed between the two groups were small. Behavior change, however, is multi-determined. Over a period of time, even small differences may make a cumulative effect. Being successful in behavior change requires that the “new” behavior is implemented time after time until it becomes a habit. Therefore, having even slightly higher self-efficacy, positive outcome expectancies and intentions may over time result in considerably improved chances to achieve long-term lifestyle changes.

Tropical land carbon cycle responses to 2015/16 El Niño as recorded by atmospheric greenhouse gas and remote sensing data
Gloor, Emanuel ; Wilson, Chris ; Chipperfield, Martyn P. ; Chevallier, Frederic ; Buermann, Wolfgang ; Boesch, Hartmut ; Parker, Robert ; Somkuti, Peter ; Gatti, Luciana V. ; Correia, Caio ; Domingues, Lucas G. ; Peters, Wouter ; Miller, John ; Deeter, Merritt N. ; Sullivan, Martin J.P. - \ 2018
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. Biological sciences 373 (2018)1760. - ISSN 0962-8436 - 12 p.
carbon cycle - fire - global warming - tropical forests

The outstanding tropical land climate characteristic over the past decades is rapid warming, with no significant large-scale precipitation trends. This warming is expected to continue but the effects on tropical vegetation are unknown. El Niño-related heat peaks may provide a test bed for a future hotter world. Here we analyse tropical land carbon cycle responses to the 2015/16 El Niño heat and drought anomalies using an atmospheric transport inversion. Based on the global atmospheric CO2 and fossil fuel emission records, we find no obvious signs of anomalously large carbon release compared with earlier El Niño events, suggesting resilience of tropical vegetation. We find roughly equal net carbon release anomalies from Amazonia and tropical Africa, approximately 0.5 PgC each, and smaller carbon release anomalies from tropical East Asia and southern Africa. Atmospheric CO anomalies reveal substantial fire carbon release from tropical East Asia peaking in October 2015 while fires contribute only a minor amount to the Amazonian carbon flux anomaly. Anomalously large Amazonian carbon flux release is consistent with downregulation of primary productivity during peak negative near-surface water anomaly (October 2015 to March 2016) as diagnosed by solar-induced fluorescence. Finally, we find an unexpected anomalous positive flux to the atmosphere from tropical Africa early in 2016, coincident with substantial CO release.This article is part of a discussion meeting issue 'The impact of the 2015/2016 El Niño on the terrestrial tropical carbon cycle: patterns, mechanisms and implications'.

Understanding social innovation for the well-being of forest-dependent communities : A preliminary theoretical framework
Kluvánková, Tatiana ; Brnkaľáková, Stanislava ; Špaček, Martin ; Slee, Bill ; Nijnik, Maria ; Valero, Diana ; Miller, David ; Bryce, Rosalind ; Kozová, Mária ; Polman, Nico ; Szabo, Tomáš ; Gežík, Veronika - \ 2018
Forest Policy and Economics 97 (2018). - ISSN 1389-9341 - p. 163 - 174.
Forest-dependent community - SIMRA transdisciplinary framework - Social innovation - Social innovation factors
Demographic and Social-Cognitive Factors Associated with Weight Loss in Overweight, Pre-diabetic Participants of the PREVIEW Study
Hansen, Sylvia ; Huttunen-Lenz, Maija ; Sluik, Diewertje ; Brand-Miller, Jennie ; Drummen, Mathijs ; Fogelholm, Mikael ; Handjieva-Darlenska, Teodora ; Macdonald, Ian ; Martinez, Alfredo J. ; Larsen, Thomas Meinert ; Poppitt, Sally ; Raben, Anne ; Schlicht, Wolfgang - \ 2018
International Journal of Behavioral Medicine 25 (2018)6. - ISSN 1070-5503 - p. 682 - 692.
Behavioral determination - Lifestyle intervention - Social-cognitive factors - Weight loss

Purpose: Weight loss has been demonstrated to be a successful strategy in diabetes prevention. Although weight loss is greatly influenced by dietary behaviors, social-cognitive factors play an important role in behavioral determination. This study aimed to identify demographic and social-cognitive factors (intention, self-efficacy, outcome expectancies, social support, and motivation with regard to dietary behavior and goal adjustment) associated with weight loss in overweight and obese participants from the PREVIEW study who had pre-diabetes. Method: Prospective correlational data from 1973 adult participants were analyzed. The participants completed psychological questionnaires that assessed social-cognitive variables with regard to dietary behavior. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were performed to identify baseline demographic and social-cognitive factors associated with weight loss. Results: Overall, being male, having a higher baseline BMI, having a higher income, perceiving fewer disadvantages of a healthy diet (outcome expectancies), experiencing less discouragement for healthy eating by family and friends (social support), and lower education were independently linked to greater weight loss. When evaluating females and males separately, education was no longer associated with weight loss. Conclusion: The results indicate that a supportive environment in which family members and friends avoid discouraging healthy eating, with the application of a strategy that uses specific behavior change techniques to emphasize the benefits of outcomes, i.e., the benefits of a healthy diet, may support weight loss efforts. Weight loss programs should therefore always address the social environment of persons who try to lose body weight because family members and friends can be important supporters in reaching a weight loss goal.

CTDAS-Lagrange v1.0 : A high-resolution data assimilation system for regional carbon dioxide observations
He, Wei ; Velde, Ivar R. van der; Andrews, Arlyn E. ; Sweeney, Colm ; Miller, John ; Tans, Pieter ; Laan-Luijkx, Ingrid T. van der; Nehrkorn, Thomas ; Mountain, Marikate ; Ju, Weimin ; Peters, Wouter ; Chen, Huilin - \ 2018
Geoscientific Model Development 11 (2018)8. - ISSN 1991-959X - p. 3515 - 3536.

We have implemented a regional carbon dioxide data assimilation system based on the CarbonTracker Data Assimilation Shell (CTDAS) and a high-resolution Lagrangian transport model, the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport model driven by the Weather Forecast and Research meteorological fields (WRF-STILT). With this system, named CTDAS-Lagrange, we simultaneously optimize terrestrial biosphere fluxes and four parameters that adjust the lateral boundary conditions (BCs) against CO2 observations from the NOAA ESRL North America tall tower and aircraft programmable flask packages (PFPs) sampling program. Least-squares optimization is performed with a time-stepping ensemble Kalman smoother, over a time window of 10 days and assimilating sequentially a time series of observations. Because the WRF-STILT footprints are pre-computed, it is computationally efficient to run the CTDAS-Lagrange system. To estimate the uncertainties in the optimized fluxes from the system, we performed sensitivity tests with various a priori biosphere fluxes (SiBCASA, SiB3, CT2013B) and BCs (optimized mole fraction fields from CT2013B and CTE2014, and an empirical dataset derived from aircraft observations), as well as with a variety of choices on the ways that fluxes are adjusted (additive or multiplicative), covariance length scales, biosphere flux covariances, BC parameter uncertainties, and model-data mismatches. In pseudo-data experiments, we show that in our implementation the additive flux adjustment method is more flexible in optimizing net ecosystem exchange (NEE) than the multiplicative flux adjustment method, and our sensitivity tests with real observations show that the CTDAS-Lagrange system has the ability to correct for the potential biases in the lateral BCs and to resolve large biases in the prior biosphere fluxes. Using real observations, we have derived a range of estimates for the optimized carbon fluxes from a series of sensitivity tests, which places the North American carbon sink for the year 2010 in a range from -0.92 to -1.26PgCyr-1. This is comparable to the TM5-based estimates of CarbonTracker (version CT2016, -0.91±1.10PgCyr-1) and CarbonTracker Europe (version CTE2016, -0.91±0.31PgCyr-1). We conclude that CTDAS-Lagrange can offer a versatile and computationally attractive alternative to these global systems for regional estimates of carbon fluxes, which can take advantage of high-resolution Lagrangian footprints that are increasingly easy to obtain.

Increased water-use efficiency and reduced CO2 uptake by plants during droughts at a continental scale
Peters, W. ; Velde, I.R. van der; Schaik, Erik van; Miller, John B. ; Ciais, Philippe ; Duarte, Henrique F. ; Laan-Luijkx, I.T. van der; Molen, M.K. van der; Scholze, M. ; Schaefer, Kevin ; Vidale, Pier Luigi ; Verhoef, Anne ; Wårlind, D. ; Zhu, Dan ; Tans, Pieter P. ; Vaughn, Bruce ; White, James W.C. - \ 2018
Nature Geoscience 11 (2018). - ISSN 1752-0894 - p. 744 - 748.
Severe droughts in the Northern Hemisphere cause a widespread decline of agricultural yield, the reduction of forest carbon uptake, and increased CO2 growth rates in the atmosphere. Plants respond to droughts by partially closing their stomata to limit their evaporative water loss, at the expense of carbon uptake by photosynthesis. This trade-off maximizes their water-use efficiency (WUE), as measured for many individual plants under laboratory conditions and field experiments. Here we analyse the 13C/12C stable isotope ratio in atmospheric CO2 to provide new observational evidence of the impact of droughts on the WUE across areas of millions of square kilometres and spanning one decade of recent climate variability. We find strong and spatially coherent increases in WUE along with widespread reductions of net carbon uptake over the Northern Hemisphere during severe droughts that affected Europe, Russia and the United States in 2001–2011. The impact of those droughts on WUE and carbon uptake by vegetation is substantially larger than simulated by the land-surface schemes of six state-of-the-art climate models. This suggests that drought-induced carbon–climate feedbacks may be too small in these models and improvements to their vegetation dynamics using stable isotope observations can help to improve their drought response.
The contribution of mitochondrial metagenomics to large-scale data mining and phylogenetic analysis of Coleoptera
Linard, Benjamin ; Crampton-Platt, Alex ; Moriniere, Jerome ; Timmermans, Martijn J.T.N. ; Andújar, Carmelo ; Arribas, Paula ; Miller, Kirsten E. ; Lipecki, Julia ; Favreau, Emeline ; Hunter, Amie ; Gómez-Rodríguez, Carola ; Barton, Christopher ; Nie, Ruie ; Gillett, Conrad P.D.T. ; Breeschoten, Thijmen ; Bocak, Ladislav ; Vogler, Alfried P. - \ 2018
Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 128 (2018). - ISSN 1055-7903 - p. 1 - 11.
Biodiversity discovery - Coleoptera - Mass-trapped samples - Metagenome skimming - Mitochondrial metagenomics

A phylogenetic tree at the species level is still far off for highly diverse insect orders, including the Coleoptera, but the taxonomic breadth of public sequence databases is growing. In addition, new types of data may contribute to increasing taxon coverage, such as metagenomic shotgun sequencing for assembly of mitogenomes from bulk specimen samples. The current study explores the application of these techniques for large-scale efforts to build the tree of Coleoptera. We used shotgun data from 17 different ecological and taxonomic datasets (5 unpublished) to assemble a total of 1942 mitogenome contigs of >3000 bp. These sequences were combined into a single dataset together with all mitochondrial data available at GenBank, in addition to nuclear markers widely used in molecular phylogenetics. The resulting matrix of nearly 16,000 species with two or more loci produced trees (RAxML) showing overall congruence with the Linnaean taxonomy at hierarchical levels from suborders to genera. We tested the role of full-length mitogenomes in stabilizing the tree from GenBank data, as mitogenomes might link terminals with non-overlapping gene representation. However, the mitogenome data were only partly useful in this respect, presumably because of the purely automated approach to assembly and gene delimitation, but improvements in future may be possible by using multiple assemblers and manual curation. In conclusion, the combination of data mining and metagenomic sequencing of bulk samples provided the largest phylogenetic tree of Coleoptera to date, which represents a summary of existing phylogenetic knowledge and a defensible tree of great utility, in particular for studies at the intra-familial level, despite some shortcomings for resolving basal nodes.

The Ozone Monitoring Instrument : Overview of 14 years in space
Levelt, Pieternel F. ; Joiner, Joanna ; Tamminen, Johanna ; Veefkind, J.P. ; Bhartia, Pawan K. ; Zweers, Deborah C.S. ; Duncan, Bryan N. ; Streets, David G. ; Eskes, Henk ; Der, Ronald A. Van; McLinden, Chris ; Fioletov, Vitali ; Carn, Simon ; Laat, Jos De; Deland, Matthew ; Marchenko, Sergey ; McPeters, Richard ; Ziemke, Jerald ; Fu, Dejian ; Liu, Xiong ; Pickering, Kenneth ; Apituley, Arnoud ; Abad, Gonzalo González ; Arola, Antti ; Boersma, Folkert ; Miller, Christopher Chan ; Chance, Kelly ; Graaf, Martin De; Hakkarainen, Janne ; Hassinen, Seppo ; Ialongo, Iolanda ; Kleipool, Quintus ; Krotkov, Nickolay ; Li, Can ; Lamsal, Lok ; Newman, Paul ; Nowlan, Caroline ; Suleiman, Raid ; Tilstra, Lieuwe Gijsbert ; Torres, Omar ; Wang, Huiqun ; Wargan, Krzysztof - \ 2018
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 18 (2018)8. - ISSN 1680-7316 - p. 5699 - 5745.
This overview paper highlights the successes of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board the Aura satellite spanning a period of nearly 14 years. Data from OMI has been used in a wide range of applications and research resulting in many new findings. Due to its unprecedented spatial resolution, in combination with daily global coverage, OMI plays a unique role in measuring trace gases important for the ozone layer, air quality, and climate change. With the operational very fast delivery (VFD; direct readout) and near real-time (NRT) availability of the data, OMI also plays an important role in the development of operational services in the atmospheric chemistry domain.
Objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time are associated with cardiometabolic risk factors in adults with prediabetes : The PREVIEW study
Swindell, Nils ; Mackintosh, Kelly ; Mcnarry, Melitta ; Stephens, Jeffrey W. ; Sluik, Diewertje ; Fogelholm, Mikael ; Drummen, Mathijs ; Macdonald, Ian ; Martinez, J.A. ; Handjieva-Darlenska, Teodora ; Poppitt, Sally D. ; Brand-Miller, Jennie ; Larsen, Thomas M. ; Raben, Anne ; Stratton, Gareth - \ 2018
Diabetes Care 41 (2018)3. - ISSN 0149-5992 - p. 562 - 569.
OBJECTIVE The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to examine the association among physical activity (PA), sedentary time (ST), and cardiometabolic risk in adults with prediabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Participants (n = 2,326; 25-70 years old, 67% female) from eight countries, with a BMI >25 kg · m22 and impaired fasting glucose (5.6-6.9 mmol · L21) or impaired glucose tolerance (7.8-11.0 mmol · L21 at 2 h), participated. Seven-day accelerometry objectively assessed PA levels and ST. RESULTS Multiple linear regression revealed that moderate-To-vigorous PA (MVPA) was negatively associated withHOMAof insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (standardizedb =20.078 [95% CI20.128,20.027]), waist circumference (WC) (b =20.177 [20.122,20.134]), fasting insulin (b = 20.115 [20.158, 20.072]), 2-h glucose (b = 20.069 [20.112, 20.025]), triglycerides (b = 20.091 [20.138, 20.044]), and CRP (b = 20.086 [20.127, 20.045]). ST was positively associated with HOMA-IR (b = 0.175 [0.114, 0.236]), WC (b = 0.215 [0.026, 0.131]), fasting insulin (b = 0.155 [0.092, 0.219]), triglycerides (b = 0.106 [0.052, 0.16]), CRP (b = 0.106 [0.39, 0.172]), systolic blood pressure (BP) (b = 0.078 [0.026, 0.131]), and diastolic BP (b = 0.106 [0.39, 20.172]). Associations reported between total PA (counts · min21), and all risk factors were comparable or stronger than for MVPA: HOMA-IR (b = 20.151 [20.194, 20.107]), WC (b = 20.179 [20.224, 20.134]), fasting insulin (b = 20.139 [20.183, 20.096]), 2-h glucose (b = 20.088 [20.131, 20.045]), triglycerides (b = 20.117 [20.162, 20.071]), and CRP (b = 20.104 [20.146, 20.062]). CONCLUSIONS In adults with prediabetes, objectively measured PA and ST were associated with cardiometabolic risk markers. Total PA was at least as strongly associated with cardiometabolic risk markers as MVPA, which may imply that the accumulation of total PA over the day is as important as achieving the intensity of MVPA.
The CarbonTracker Data Assimilation System for CO2 and δ13C (CTDAS-C13 v1.0) : Retrieving information on land-atmosphere exchange processes
Velde, Ivar R. Van Der; Miller, John B. ; Molen, Michiel K. Van Der; Tans, Pieter P. ; Vaughn, Bruce H. ; White, James W.C. ; Schaefer, Kevin ; Peters, Wouter - \ 2018
Geoscientific Model Development 11 (2018)1. - ISSN 1991-959X - p. 283 - 304.
To improve our understanding of the global carbon balance and its representation in terrestrial biosphere models, we present here a first dual-species application of the CarbonTracker Data Assimilation System (CTDAS). The system's modular design allows for assimilating multiple atmospheric trace gases simultaneously to infer exchange fluxes at the Earth surface. In the prototype discussed here, we interpret signals recorded in observed carbon dioxide (CO2) along with observed ratios of its stable isotopologues 13CO2/12CO2 (δ13C). The latter is in particular a valuable tracer to untangle CO2 exchange from land and oceans. Potentially, it can also be used as a proxy for continent-wide drought stress in plants, largely because the ratio of 13CO2 and 12CO2 molecules removed from the atmosphere by plants is dependent on moisture conditions. The dual-species CTDAS system varies the net exchange fluxes of both 13CO2 and CO2 in ocean and terrestrial biosphere models to create an ensemble of 13CO2 and CO2 fluxes that propagates through an atmospheric transport model. Based on differences between observed and simulated 13CO2 and CO2 mole fractions (and thus δ13C) our Bayesian minimization approach solves for weekly adjustments to both net fluxes and isotopic terrestrial discrimination that minimizes the difference between observed and estimated mole fractions. With this system, we are able to estimate changes in terrestrial δ13C exchange on seasonal and continental scales in the Northern Hemisphere where the observational network is most dense. Our results indicate a decrease in stomatal conductance on a continent-wide scale during a severe drought. These changes could only be detected after applying combined atmospheric CO2 and δ13C constraints as done in this work. The additional constraints on surface CO2 exchange from δ13C observations neither affected the estimated carbon fluxes nor compromised our ability to match observed CO2 variations. The prototype presented here can be of great benefit not only to study the global carbon balance but also to potentially function as a data-driven diagnostic to assess multiple leaf-level exchange parameterizations in carbon-climate models that influence the CO2, water, isotope, and energy balance.
The sustainable seafood movement is a Governance concert, with the audience playing a key role
Barclay, Kate ; Miller, Alice - \ 2018
Sustainability 10 (2018)1. - ISSN 2071-1050
Corporate social responsibility - Ecolabels - Ethical consumption - Green marketing - Supply chain management - Sustainable seafood
Private standards, including ecolabels, have been posed as a governance solution for the global fisheries crisis. The conventional logic is that ecolabels meet consumer demand for certified "sustainable" seafood, with "good" players rewarded with price premiums or market share and "bad" players punished by reduced sales. Empirically, however, in the markets where ecolabeling has taken hold, retailers and brands-rather than consumers-are demanding sustainable sourcing, to build and protect their reputation. The aim of this paper is to devise a more accurate logic for understanding the sustainable seafood movement, using a qualitative literature review and reflection on our previous research. We find that replacing the consumer-driven logic with a retailer/brand-driven logic does not go far enough in making research into the sustainable seafood movement more useful. Governance is a "concert" and cannot be adequately explained through individual actor groups. We propose a new logic going beyond consumer- or retailer/brand-driven models, and call on researchers to build on the partial pictures given by studies on prices and willingness-to-pay, investigating more fully the motivations of actors in the sustainable seafood movement, and considering audience beyond the direct consumption of the product in question.
Labor, social sustainability and the underlying vulnerabilities of work in Southeast Asia's seafood value chains
Bush, Simon R. ; Marschke, Melissa J. ; Belton, Ben - \ 2017
In: Routledge Handbook of Southeast Asian Development / McGregor, Andrew, Law, Lisa, Miller, Fiona, Taylor and Francis - ISBN 9781138848535 - p. 316 - 329.
Labor, social sustainability and the underlying vulnerabilities of work in Southeast Asia’s seafood value chains
Healthcare entitlements for citizens and transborder mobile peoples in Southeast Asia
Ormond, Meghann ; Khoon, Chan Chee ; Verghis, Sharuna - \ 2017
In: Routledge Handbook of Southeast Asian Development / McGregor, Andrew, Law, Lisa, Miller, Fiona, Abington : Routledge - ISBN 9781138848535 - p. 186 - 197.
The health of a population is shaped by a complex interplay of economic, political, social, cultural and biological factors that transcend national borders. In this chapter, we consider how these factors work together within the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), a supra-national regional political space encompassing a population of over 600 million across ten countries. Specifically, we query how economic liberalization and corollary increases in the movement of people, goods and services are challenging and transforming entrenched ideas about who is entitled to and responsible for health and social care within and across ASEAN member states’ national borders.
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