Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Records 1 - 20 / 971

  • help
  • print

    Print search results

  • export
    A maximum of 250 titles can be exported. Please, refine your queryYou can also select and export up to 30 titles via your marked list.
  • alert
    We will mail you new results for this query: q=Putten
Check title to add to marked list
Unexpected role of canonical aerobic methanotrophs in upland agricultural soils
Ho, Adrian ; Lee, Hyo Jung ; Reumer, Max ; Meima-Franke, Marion ; Raaijmakers, Ciska ; Zweers, Hans ; Boer, Wietse de; Putten, Wim H. Van der; Bodelier, Paul L.E. - \ 2019
Soil Biology and Biochemistry 131 (2019). - ISSN 0038-0717 - p. 1 - 8.
C labelling - High-affinity methane oxidation - Methylocystaceae - PLFA analysis/ land-use change - pmoA

Aerobic oxidation of methane at (circum-)atmospheric concentrations (<40 ppmv) has long been assumed to be catalyzed by the as-yet-uncultured high-affinity methanotrophs in well-aerated, non-wetland (upland) soils, the only known biological methane sink globally. Although the low-affinity canonical methanotrophs with cultured representatives have been detected along with the high-affinity ones, their role as a methane sink in upland soils remains enigmatic. Here, we show that canonical methanotrophs can contribute to (circum-)atmospheric methane uptake in agricultural soils. We performed a stable-isotope 13C–CH4 labelling incubation in the presence and absence of bio-based residues that were added to the soil to track the flow of methane. Residue amendment transiently stimulated methane uptake rate (<50 days). Soil methane uptake was sustained throughout the incubation (130 days), concomitant to the enrichment of 13C–CO2. The 13C-enriched phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) were distinct in both soils, irrespective of amendments, and were unambiguously assigned almost exclusively to canonical alphaproteobacterial methanotrophs with cultured representatives. 16S rRNA and pmoA gene sequence analyses revealed that the as-yet-uncultured high-affinity methanotrophs were virtually absent in these soils. The stable-isotope labelling approach allowed to attribute soil methane uptake to canonical methanotrophs, whereas these were not expected to consume (circum-)atmospheric methane. Our findings thus revealed an overlooked reservoir of high-affinity methane-oxidizers represented by the canonical methanotrophs in agriculture-impacted upland soils. Given that upland agricultural soils have been thought to marginally or do not contribute to atmospheric methane consumption due to the vulnerability of the high-affinity methanotrophs, our findings suggest a thorough revisiting of the contribution of agricultural soils, and the role of agricultural management to mitigation of climate change.

Opportunities for soil sustainability in Europe
Putten, W.H. van der; Ramirez, Kelly S. ; Poesen, Jean ; Winding, A. ; Lemanceau, Philippe ; Lisa, Lenka ; Simek, Miloslaw ; Moora, M. ; Setala, Heikki ; Zaitsev, A. ; Economou-Eliopoulos, Maria ; Hornung, E. ; Wall, David ; Angelis, P. de; Lipiec, Jerzy ; Briones, M.J.I. ; Hedlund, Katarina ; Heijden, M. ; Six, Johan ; Bardgett, Richard D. ; Powlson, D. ; Goulding, K. ; Norton, Michael - \ 2018
- 48 p.
Carbon and nutrient cycling in organic agriculture: a chronosequence approach
Rijssel, Sophie van; Koorneef, G.J. ; Koetsenruijter, Gijs ; Schrama, Mels ; Putten, W.H. van der; Veen, Ciska G.F. - \ 2018
A key challenge is to increase sustainability in agriculture without yield loss. Organic agriculture uses no chemical fertilizers and pesticides. Instead, yield depends on nutrients released from organic inputs, and thereby on soil communities that drive soil carbon and nutrient cycling. However, these soil communities may need time to establish, resulting in lower yields during the beginning of this conversion. How carbon and nutrient cycling change during the conversion from conventional to organic agriculture is not well understood, but it may help us to understand, and eventually reduce, the yield gap. Here, we studied how carbon and nitrogen cycling change when converting conventional agricultural systems into organic agricultural systems. We used a hronosequence
approach, where we collected soil samples from 37 organic fields, on both sand and clay soils, that have been converted from conventional to organic agriculture between 1 to 40 years ago and from neighboring conventional fields. Under controlled conditions we measured potential rates of carbon and nitrogen mineralization. Potential carbon mineralization and substrate induced respiration were higher in organic soils, but there was no effect of time since conversion. This might be explained by variation in abiotic factors such as soil organic
matter content. We use our data to unravel how fast ecosystem processes change after the conversion of conventional into organic farming systems. Our findings will yield important insights how the performance of soil communities is changed during transition and this will help us to understand changes in crop yield.
Ecology Letters (Journal)
Putten, Wim van der - \ 2018
Ecology Letters (2018). - ISSN 1461-023X
Science (Journal)
Putten, Wim van der - \ 2018
Science (2018). - ISSN 0036-8075
Plant-soil interactions of range-expanding plants
Manrubia Freixa, Marta - \ 2018
Wageningen University. Promotor(en): Wim van der Putten. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789463435314 - 184
LAESI mass spectrometry imaging as a tool to differentiate the root metabolome of native and range-expanding plant species
Kulkarni, Purva ; Wilschut, Rutger A. ; Verhoeven, Koen J.F. ; Putten, Wim H. van der; Garbeva, Paolina - \ 2018
Planta 248 (2018)6. - ISSN 0032-0935 - p. 1515 - 1523.
Ambient imaging - Comparative metabolomics - Mass spectrometry imaging - Metabolic profiling - Plant root - Range expansion

Main conclusion: LAESI-MSI, an innovative high-throughput technique holds a unique potential for untargeted detection, profiling and spatial localization of metabolites from intact plant samples without need for extraction or extensive sample preparation. Our understanding of chemical diversity in biological samples has greatly improved through recent advances in mass spectrometry (MS). MS-based-imaging (MSI) techniques have further enhanced this by providing spatial information on the distribution of metabolites and their relative abundance. This study aims to employ laser-ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) MSI as a tool to profile and compare the root metabolome of two pairs of native and range-expanding plant species. It has been proposed that successful range-expanding plant species, like introduced exotic invaders, have a novel, or a more diverse secondary chemistry. Although some tests have been made using aboveground plant materials, tests using root materials are rare. We tested the hypothesis that range-expanding plants possess more diverse root chemistries than native plant species. To examine the root chemistry of the selected plant species, LAESI-MSI was performed in positive ion mode and data were acquired in a mass range of m/z 50–1200 with a spatial resolution of 100 µm. The acquired data were analyzed using in-house scripts, and differences in the spatial profiles were studied for discriminatory mass features. The results revealed clear differences in the metabolite profiles amongst and within both pairs of congeneric plant species, in the form of distinct metabolic fingerprints. The use of ambient conditions and the fact that no sample preparation was required, established LAESI-MSI as an ideal technique for untargeted metabolomics and for direct correlation of the acquired data to the underlying metabolomic complexity present in intact plant samples.

Evolutionary regression and species-specific codon usage of TLR15
Voogdt, Carlos G.P. ; Merchant, Mark E. ; Wagenaar, Jaap A. ; Putten, Jos P.M. van - \ 2018
Frontiers in Immunology 9 (2018)NOV. - ISSN 1664-3224
Codon-bias - Protease activated receptor - Reptile - TLR15 - Toll-like receptor

Toll-like receptors (TLRs) form an ancient family of innate immune receptors that detect microbial structures and activate the host immune response. Most subfamilies of TLRs (including TLR3, TLR5, and TLR7) are highly conserved among vertebrate species. In contrast, TLR15, a member of the TLR1 subfamily, appears to be unique to birds and reptiles. We investigated the functional evolution of TLR15. Phylogenetic and synteny analyses revealed putative TLR15 orthologs in bird species, several reptilian species and also in a shark species, pointing to an unprecedented date of origin of TLR15 as well as large scale reciprocal loss of this TLR in most other vertebrates. Cloning and functional analysis of TLR15 of the green anole lizard (Anolis carolinensis), salt water crocodile (Crocodylus porosus), American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis), and chicken (Gallus gallus) showed for all species TLR15 specific protease-induced activation of NF-?B, despite highly variable TLR15 protein expression levels. The variable TLR15 expression was consistent in both human and reptilian cells and could be attributed to species-specific differences in TLR15 codon usage. The species-specific codon bias was not or barely noted for more evolutionarily conserved TLRs (e.g., TLR3). Overall, our results indicate that TLR15 originates before the divergence of chondrichthyes fish and tetrapods and that TLR15 of both avian and reptilian species has a conserved function as protease activated receptor. The species-specific codon usage and large scale loss of TLR15 in most vertebrates suggest evolutionary regression of this ancient TLR.

Removal of soil biota alters soil feedback effects on plant growth and defense chemistry
Wang, Minggang ; Ruan, Weibin ; Kostenko, Olga ; Carvalho, Sabrina ; Hannula, S.E. ; Mulder, Patrick P.J. ; Bu, Fengjiao ; Putten, Wim H. van der; Bezemer, T.M. - \ 2018
New Phytologist (2018). - ISSN 0028-646X
fractionation - Jacobaea vulgaris - plant–soil feedback (PSF) - pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) - soil biota - spectral reflectance

We examined how the removal of soil biota affects plant–soil feedback (PSF) and defense chemistry of Jacobaea vulgaris, an outbreak plant species in Europe containing the defense compounds pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs). Macrofauna and mesofauna, as well as fungi and bacteria, were removed size selectively from unplanted soil or soil planted with J. vulgaris exposed or not to above- or belowground insect herbivores. Wet-sieved fractions, using 1000-, 20-, 5- and 0.2-μm mesh sizes, were added to sterilized soil and new plants were grown. Sieving treatments were verified by molecular analysis of the inocula. In the feedback phase, plant biomass was lowest in soils with 1000- and 20-μm inocula, and soils conditioned with plants gave more negative feedback than without plants. Remarkably, part of this negative PSF effect remained present in the 0.2-μm inoculum where no bacteria were present. PA concentration and composition of plants with 1000- or 20-μm inocula differed from those with 5- or 0.2-μm inocula, but only if soils had been conditioned by undamaged plants or plants damaged by aboveground herbivores. These effects correlated with leaf hyperspectral reflectance. We conclude that size-selective removal of soil biota altered PSFs, but that these PSFs were also influenced by herbivory during the conditioning phase.

Plant socialization in a new world: reconnecting with belowground and aboveground communities
Putten, Wim van der - \ 2018
It is generally assumed that the introduction of plant species in a new habitat will lead to invasion. However, only a small minority of all introduced plant species will become invasive. I will discuss how the process of ‘socialization’ might explain these patterns. In their native range, plant species interact with belowground and aboveground multi-trophic communities. The net effect of all these interactions explains plant abundance patterns. When moving to a new range, either by human help or –indirectly- by global change-induced range expansion, plants will develop interactions with the local belowground and aboveground microbes, invertebrates and vertebrates. First, generalist interactions will develop, while over time more specialized interactions will develop. Studying the temporal dynamics of these interactions in relation to plant abundance provides novel insights into the process of ‘socialization’, and I will propose that this knowledge may be used to re-define what should be considered naturalization from an aboveground-belowground perspective. This knowledge may also be used to provide multi-dimensionality to nature restoration and conservation, such as is aimed at by the intended "Deltaplan for Biodiversity Restoration".
Data from: Biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships in a long-term non-weeded field experiment
Veen, Ciska G.F. ; Putten, W.H. van der; Bezemer, T.M. - \ 2018
biodiversity-ecosystem functioning
Many grassland biodiversity experiments show a positive relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, however, in most these experiments plant communities are established by sowing and natural colonization is prevented by selective weeding of non-sown species. During ecosystem restoration, for example on abandoned fields, plant communities start on bare soil, and diversity is often manipulated in a single sowing event. How such initial plant diversity manipulations influence plant biodiversity development and ecosystem functioning is not well understood. We examined how relationships between taxonomic and functional diversity, biomass production and stability develop over 16 years in non-weeded plots sown with 15 species, 4 species, or that were not sown. We found that sown plant communities become functionally similar to unsown, naturally colonized plant communities. However, initial sowing treatments had long-lasting effects on species composition and taxonomic diversity. We found only few relationships between biomass production, or stability in biomass production, and functional or taxonomic diversity, and the ones we observed were negative. In addition, the cover of dominant plant species was positively related to biomass production and stability. We conclude that effects of introducing plant species at the start of secondary succession can persist for a long time, and that in secondary succession communities with natural plant species dynamics diversity-functioning relationships can be weak or negative. Moreover, our findings indicate that in systems where natural colonization of species is allowed effects of plant dominance may underlie diversity-functioning relationships.
Diversity relations of plants and soil microbes
Dassen, Sigrid - \ 2018
Wageningen University. Promotor(en): Gerlinde de Deyn; Wim van der Putten, co-promotor(en): G.A. Kowalchuk. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789463433419 - 166
Nematode community responses to range-expanding and native plant communities in original and new range soils
Wilschut, Rutger A. ; Kostenko, Olga ; Koorem, Kadri ; Putten, Wim H. van der - \ 2018
Ecology and Evolution 8 (2018)20. - ISSN 2045-7758 - p. 10288 - 10297.
novel interactions - plant–nematode interactions - plant–parasitic nematodes - range-expanding plant species - root-feeding nematodes

Many plant species expand their range to higher latitudes in response to climate change. However, it is poorly understood how biotic interactions in the new range differ from interactions in the original range. Here, in a mesocosm experiment, we analyze nematode community responses in original and new range soils to plant communities with either (a) species native in both the original and new range, (b) range-expanding species related to these natives (related range expanders), or (c) range expanders without native congeneric species in the new range (unrelated range expanders). We hypothesized that nematode community shifts between ranges are strongest for unrelated range expanders and minimal for plant species that are native in both ranges. As a part of these community shifts, we hypothesized that range expanders, but not natives, would accumulate fewer root-feeding nematodes in their new range compared to their original range. Analyses of responses of nematodes from both original and new ranges and comparison between range expanders with and without close relatives have not been made before. Our study reveals that none of the plant communities experienced evident nematode community shifts between the original and new range. However, in soils from the new range, root-feeding nematode communities of natives and related range expanders were more similar than in soils from the original range, whereas the nematode community of unrelated range expanders was distinct from the communities of natives and related range expanders in soils from both ranges. The abundances of root-feeding nematodes were comparable between the original and new range for all plant communities. Unexpectedly, unrelated range expanders overall accumulated most root-feeding nematodes, whereas related range expanders accumulated fewest. We conclude that nematode communities associated with native and range-expanding plant species differ between the original and the new range, but that range-expanding plant species do not accumulate fewer root-feeding nematodes in their new than in their original range.

Data from: Increased transgenerational epigenetic variation, but not predictable epigenetic variants, after environmental exposure in two apomictic dandelion lineages
Preite, Veronica ; Oplaat, Carla ; Biere, Arjen ; Kirschner, Jan ; Putten, W.H. van der; Verhoeven, Koen J.F. - \ 2018
DNA methylation - stress memory - drought - salicylic acid
DNA methylation is one of the mechanisms underlying epigenetic modifications. DNA methylations can be environmentally induced and such induced modifications can at times be transmitted to successive generations. However, it remains speculative how common such environmentally induced transgenerational DNA methylation changes are and if they persist for more than one offspring generation. We exposed multiple accessions of two different apomictic dandelion lineages of the Taraxacum officinale group (Taraxacum alatum and T. hemicyclum) to drought and salicylic acid (SA) treatment. Using methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphism markers (MS-AFLPs) we screened anonymous methylation changes at CCGG restriction sites throughout the genome after stress treatments and assessed the heritability of induced changes for two subsequent unexposed offspring generations. Irrespective of the initial stress treatment, a clear buildup of heritable DNA methylation variation was observed across three generations, indicating a considerable background rate of heritable epimutations. Less evidence was detected for environmental effects. Drought stress showed some evidence for accession-specific methylation changes, but only in the exposed generation and not in their offspring. By contrast, SA treatment caused an increased rate of methylation change in offspring of treated plants. These changes were seemingly undirected resulting in increased transgenerational epigenetic variation between offspring individuals, but not in predictable epigenetic variants. While the functional consequences of these MS-AFLP-detected DNA methylation changes remain to be demonstrated, our study shows that (1) stress-induced transgenerational DNA methylation modification in dandelions is genotype and context-specific; and (2) inherited environmental DNA methylation effects are mostly undirected and not targeted to specific loci.
Size-dependent loss of aboveground animals differentially affects grassland ecosystem coupling and functions
Risch, A.C. ; Ochoa-Hueso, R. ; Putten, W.H. van der; Bump, J.K. ; Busse, M.D. ; Frey, B. ; Gwiazdowicz, D.J. ; Page-Dumroese, D.S. ; Vandegehuchte, M.L. ; Zimmermann, S. ; Schütz, M. - \ 2018
Nature Communications 9 (2018)1. - ISSN 2041-1723

Increasing evidence suggests that community-level responses to human-induced biodiversity loss start with a decrease of interactions among communities and between them and their abiotic environment. The structural and functional consequences of such interaction losses are poorly understood and have rarely been tested in real-world systems. Here, we analysed how 5 years of progressive, size-selective exclusion of large, medium, and small vertebrates and invertebrates—a realistic scenario of human-induced defaunation—impacts the strength of relationships between above- and belowground communities and their abiotic environment (hereafter ecosystem coupling) and how this relates to ecosystem functionality in grasslands. Exclusion of all vertebrates results in the greatest level of ecosystem coupling, while the additional loss of invertebrates leads to poorly coupled ecosystems. Consumer-driven changes in ecosystem functionality are positively related to changes in ecosystem coupling. Our results highlight the importance of invertebrate communities for maintaining ecological coupling and functioning in an increasingly defaunated world.

Data from: Increased transgenerational epigenetic variation, but not predictable epigenetic variants, after environmental exposure in two apomictic dandelion lineages
Preite, Veronica ; Oplaat, Carla ; Biere, Arjen ; Kirschner, Jan ; Putten, W.H. van der; Verhoeven, Koen J.F. - \ 2018
DNA methylation - stress memory - drought - salicylic acid - Taraxacum officinale
DNA methylation is one of the mechanisms underlying epigenetic modifications. DNA methylations can be environmentally induced and such induced modifications can at times be transmitted to successive generations. However, it remains speculative how common such environmentally induced transgenerational DNA methylation changes are and if they persist for more than one offspring generation. We exposed multiple accessions of two different apomictic dandelion lineages of the Taraxacum officinale group (Taraxacum alatum and T. hemicyclum) to drought and salicylic acid (SA) treatment. Using methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphism markers (MS-AFLPs) we screened anonymous methylation changes at CCGG restriction sites throughout the genome after stress treatments and assessed the heritability of induced changes for two subsequent unexposed offspring generations. Irrespective of the initial stress treatment, a clear buildup of heritable DNA methylation variation was observed across three generations, indicating a considerable background rate of heritable epimutations. Less evidence was detected for environmental effects. Drought stress showed some evidence for accession-specific methylation changes, but only in the exposed generation and not in their offspring. By contrast, SA treatment caused an increased rate of methylation change in offspring of treated plants. These changes were seemingly undirected resulting in increased transgenerational epigenetic variation between offspring individuals, but not in predictable epigenetic variants. While the functional consequences of these MS-AFLP-detected DNA methylation changes remain to be demonstrated, our study shows that (1) stress-induced transgenerational DNA methylation modification in dandelions is genotype and context-specific; and (2) inherited environmental DNA methylation effects are mostly undirected and not targeted to specific loci.
Data from: Variation in home-field advantage and ability in leaf litter decomposition across successional gradients
Veen, Ciska G.F. ; Keiser, Ashley D. ; Putten, W.H. van der; Wardle, David A. - \ 2018
decomposition - functional breadth - succession - soil - plant-litter feedback
1. It is increasingly recognized that interactions between plants and soil (a)biotic conditions can influence local decomposition processes. For example, decomposer communities may become specialized in breaking down litter of plant species that they are associated with, resulting in accelerated decomposition, known as ‘home-field advantage’ (HFA). Also, soils can vary inherently in their capacity to degrade organic compounds, known as ‘ability’. However, we have a poor understanding how environmental conditions drive the occurrence of HFA and ability. 2. Here, we studied how HFA and ability change across three types of successional gradients: coastal sand dunes (primary succession), inland drift sands (primary succession), and ex-arable fields (secondary succession). Across these gradients, litter quality (i.e., nutrient, carbon and lignin contents) increases with successional time for coastal dunes and decreases for the other two gradients. 3. We performed a 12-month reciprocal litter transplant experiment under greenhouse conditions using soils and litters collected from early-, mid-, and late-successional stages of each gradient. 4. We found that HFA and ability did not consistently shift with successional stage for all gradients, but were instead specific for each type of successional gradient. In coastal dunes HFA was positive for early-successional litter, in drift sands it was negative for mid-successional litter, and for ex-arable fields, HFA increased with successional time. Ability of decomposer communities was highest in mid-successional stages for coastal dunes and drift sands, but for ex-arable fields ability decreased throughout with successional time. High HFA was related to high litter C content and soil and organic matter content in soils and to low litter and soil nutrient concentrations. Ability did not consistently occur in successional stages with high or low litter quality. 5. Synthesis: Our findings show that specific environmental conditions, such as changes in litter or soil quality, along environmental gradients can shape the influence of HFA and ability on decomposition. In sites with strong HFA or ability, interactions between plants, litter and decomposer communities will be important drivers of nutrient cycling and hence have the potential to feedback to plant growth.
Reply to comment by Van de Ven et al. on our paper “Crop yield gap and stability in conventional and organic systems”
Schrama, M. ; Haan, J.J. de; Kroonen, M. ; Verstegen, H. ; Putten, W.H. van der - \ 2018
Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 267 (2018). - ISSN 0167-8809 - p. 83 - 86.
Network Analyses Can Advance Above-Belowground Ecology
Ramirez, Kelly S. ; Geisen, Stefan ; Morriën, Elly ; Snoek, Basten L. ; Putten, Wim H. van der - \ 2018
Trends in Plant Science 23 (2018)9. - ISSN 1360-1385 - p. 759 - 768.
community ecology - global change - species interactions - terrestrial ecology

An understanding of above-belowground (AG-BG) ecology is important for evaluating how plant interactions with enemies, symbionts, and decomposers affect species diversity and will respond to global changes. However, research questions and experiments often focus on only a limited number of interactions, creating an incomplete picture of how entire communities may be involved in AG-BG community ecology. Therefore, a pressing challenge is to formulate hypotheses of AG-BG interactions when considering communities in their full complexity. Here we discuss how network analyses can be a powerful tool to progress AG-BG research, link across scales from individual to community and ecosystem, visualize community interactions between the two (AG and BG) subsystems, and develop testable hypotheses.

Data from: Soil microbial species loss affects plant biomass and survival of an introduced bacterial strain, but not inducible plant defences
Kurm, V. ; Putten, W.H. van der; Pineda, Ana ; Hol, G.W.H. - \ 2018
induced systemic resistence - low abundant soil microbes - PGPR - Arabidopsis thaliana - Myzus persicae - Pseudomonas fluorescens
Background and Aims: Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strains can influence plant-insect interactions. However, little is known about the effect of changes in the soil bacterial community in general and especially the loss of rare soil microbes on these interactions. Here, the influence of rare soil microbe-reduction on induced systemic resistance (ISR) in a wild ecotype of Arabidopsis thaliana against the aphid Myzus persicae was investigated. - Methods: To create a gradient of microbial abundances, soil was inoculated with a serial dilution of a microbial community and responses of Arabidopsis plants that originated from the same site as the soil microbes were tested. Plant biomass, transcription of genes involved in plant defences, and insect performance were measured. In addition, the effects of the PGPR strain Pseudomonas fluorescens SS101 on plant and insect performance were tested under influence of the various soil dilution treatments. - Key Results: Plant biomass showed a hump-shaped relationship with soil microbial community dilution, independent of aphid or Pseudomonas treatments. Both aphid infestation and inoculation with Pseudomonas reduced plant biomass, and led to downregulation of PR1 (salicylic acid-responsive gene) and CYP79B3 (involved in synthesis of glucosinolates). Aphid performance and gene transcription were unaffected by soil dilution. - Conclusions: Neither the loss of rare microbial species, as caused by soil dilution, nor Pseudomonas, affect the resistance of A. thaliana against M. persicae. However, both Pseudomonas survival and plant biomass respond to rare species loss. Thus, loss of rare soil microbial species can have a significant impact on both above- and belowground organisms.
Check title to add to marked list
<< previous | next >>

Show 20 50 100 records per page

 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.