Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Does topsoil removal in grassland restoration benefit both soil nematode and plant communities?
Resch, Monika Carol ; Schütz, Martin ; Graf, Ulrich ; Wagenaar, Roel ; Putten, Wim H. ; Risch, Anita C. - \ 2019
Journal of Applied Ecology (2019). - ISSN 0021-8901
biodiversity - biological indicators - food web structure - long-term recovery - propagule availability - restoration success - semi-natural grasslands - topsoil removal

Successful restoration of semi-natural grasslands on grasslands previously subject to intensive management needs to overcome manifold barriers. These include high soil fertility, the dominance of a few fast-growing plant species, degraded soil faunal communities and missing propagules of the targeted above- and below-ground flora and fauna. A combination of removing the topsoil and introducing propagules of target plants has become one of the major tools for nature conservation agencies and practitioners to reduce soil fertility and restore former species-rich grasslands in various European countries. Using topsoil removal as a restoration measure has provoked an ongoing debate between supporting nature conservation and rejecting soil protection agencies. Although it favours species-rich plant communities, it strongly disturbs soil communities and affects physical and chemical soil properties and processes. Currently, there is a lack of long-term data to assess how restored grassland ecosystems develop and recover after topsoil removal. Here, we used two well-established bioindicators, soil nematodes and plants, to quantify restoration success of topsoil removal in comparison with alternative restoration measures and target communities 22 years after intervention. The nematode community composition indicated reduced nutrient availability in the restored systems, as was aimed at by topsoil removal. Nevertheless, after this 22-year period following topsoil removal, nematode composition and structure revealed successful recovery. Plant communities benefitted from the reduction of soil nutrients after topsoil removal as indicated by higher numbers of plant species and higher Shannon diversity. Furthermore, topsoil removal strongly promoted the re-establishment of plant species of the target plant community. Synthesis and applications. Overall, our study demonstrates how a massive intervention by topsoil removal proved successful in converting intensively managed into species-rich grasslands. This contrasts with the mild intervention of repeated mowing and removing of the harvested plant material. We show that, in the long run, potential negative effects of topsoil removal on the soil fauna can be successfully overcome and plant communities can develop into targeted species-rich grassland.

A data-driven surrogate modelling approach for acceleration of short-term simulations of a dynamic urban drainage simulator
Mahmoodian, Mahmood ; Torres-Matallana, Jairo Arturo ; Leopold, Ulrich ; Schutz, Georges ; Clemens, Francois H.L.R. - \ 2018
Water 10 (2018)12. - ISSN 2073-4441
Data-driven - Emulator - Gaussian process - Surrogate model - Urban drainage

In this study, applicability of a data-driven Gaussian Process Emulator (GPE) technique to develop a dynamic surrogate model for a computationally expensive urban drainage simulator is investigated. Considering rainfall time series as the main driving force is a challenge in this regard due to the high dimensionality problem. However, this problem can be less relevant when the focus is only on short-term simulations. The novelty of this research is the consideration of short-term rainfall time series as training parameters for the GPE. Rainfall intensity at each time step is counted as a separate parameter. A method to generate synthetic rainfall events for GPE training purposes is introduced as well. Here, an emulator is developed to predict the upcoming daily time series of the total wastewater volume in a storage tank and the corresponding Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) volume. Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) and Volumetric Efficiency (VE) are calculated as emulation error indicators. For the case study herein, the emulator is able to speed up the simulations up to 380 times with a low accuracy cost for prediction of the total storage tank volume (medians of NSE = 0.96 and VE = 0.87). CSO events occurrence is detected in 82% of the cases, although with some considerable accuracy cost (medians of NSE = 0.76 and VE = 0.5). Applicability of the emulator for consecutive short-term simulations, based on real observed rainfall time series is also validated with a high accuracy (NSE = 0.97, VE = 0.89).

Size-dependent loss of aboveground animals differentially affects grassland ecosystem coupling and functions
Risch, A.C. ; Ochoa-Hueso, R. ; Putten, W.H. van der; Bump, J.K. ; Busse, M.D. ; Frey, B. ; Gwiazdowicz, D.J. ; Page-Dumroese, D.S. ; Vandegehuchte, M.L. ; Zimmermann, S. ; Schütz, M. - \ 2018
Nature Communications 9 (2018)1. - ISSN 2041-1723

Increasing evidence suggests that community-level responses to human-induced biodiversity loss start with a decrease of interactions among communities and between them and their abiotic environment. The structural and functional consequences of such interaction losses are poorly understood and have rarely been tested in real-world systems. Here, we analysed how 5 years of progressive, size-selective exclusion of large, medium, and small vertebrates and invertebrates—a realistic scenario of human-induced defaunation—impacts the strength of relationships between above- and belowground communities and their abiotic environment (hereafter ecosystem coupling) and how this relates to ecosystem functionality in grasslands. Exclusion of all vertebrates results in the greatest level of ecosystem coupling, while the additional loss of invertebrates leads to poorly coupled ecosystems. Consumer-driven changes in ecosystem functionality are positively related to changes in ecosystem coupling. Our results highlight the importance of invertebrate communities for maintaining ecological coupling and functioning in an increasingly defaunated world.

"Actionable" critical success factors for supply chain information system implementations : Exploratory findings from four German pork supply chains
Denolf, Janne M. ; Trienekens, Jacques H. ; Nel Wognum, P.M. ; Schütz, Verena ; Vorst, Jack G.A.J. Van Der; Onno Omta, S.W.F. - \ 2018
International Journal on Food System Dynamics 9 (2018)1. - ISSN 1869-6945 - p. 79 - 100.
Actionable csfs (actions) - Critical success factors - Food sector - Pork supply chains - Supply chain information systems
Implementing a supply chain information system (SCIS) incurs organizational and technical complexities. For managing these complexities, information system researchers have identified generic critical success factors. However, CSFs are abstract and, therefore, difficult to use in practice. To maximize the chances of successfully implementing a SCIS in the food industry, we aim to identify "actions" linked to CSFs. We, consequently, investigated four German pork supply chains that implemented a SCIS. Fourteen critical success factors were made "actionable"; most actions were identified for the CSFs "manage change and deliver training" and "select standards, vendor, and software package", indicating their relative importance.
Aboveground mammal and invertebrate exclusions cause consistent changes in soil food webs of two subalpine grassland types, but mechanisms are system-specific
Vandegehuchte, Martijn L. ; Putten, Wim H. Van Der; Duyts, Henk ; Schütz, Martin ; Risch, Anita C. - \ 2017
Oikos 126 (2017)2. - ISSN 0030-1299 - p. 212 - 223.
Ungulates, smaller mammals, and invertebrates can each affect soil biota through their influence on vegetation and soil characteristics. However, direct and indirect effects of the aboveground biota on soil food webs remain to be unraveled. We assessed effects of progressively excluding aboveground large-, medium- and small-sized mammals as well as invertebrates on soil nematode diversity and feeding type abundances in two subalpine grassland types: short- and tall-grass vegetation. We explored pathways that link exclusions of aboveground biota to nematode feeding type abundances via changes in plants, soil environment, soil microbial biomass, and soil nutrients.

In both vegetation types, exclusions caused a similar shift toward higher abundance of all nematode feeding types, except plant feeders, lower Shannon diversity, and lower evenness. These effects were strongest when small mammals, or both small mammals and invertebrates were excluded in addition to excluding larger mammals. Exclusions resulted in a changed abiotic soil environment that only affected nematodes in the short-grass vegetation. In each vegetation type, exclusion effects on nematode abundances were mediated by different drivers related to plant quantity and quality. In the short-grass vegetation, not all exclusion effects on omni–carnivorous nematodes were mediated by the abundance of lower trophic level nematodes, suggesting that omni–carnivores also depended on other prey than nematodes.

We conclude that small aboveground herbivores have major impacts on the soil food web of subalpine short- and tall-grass ecosystems. Excluding aboveground animals caused similar shifts in soil nematode assemblages in both subalpine vegetation types, however, mechanisms turned out to be system-specific.
Biosensor comprising a modified metal surface and method for the modification of a metal surface
Alonso Carnicero, J.M. ; Franssen, M.C.R. ; Bielen, A.A.M. ; Scheres, L.M.W. ; Schütz-Trilling, A.K. ; Zeper, W.B. ; Zuilhof, J.T. ; Paassen, P.A.M. van; Olthuis, W. ; Rassaei, L. - \ 2016
Octrooinummer: WO2016018148, verleend: 2016-02-04.
The present invention relates to a device for the detection of an analyte in a fluid, the device comprising: (a) a working electrode comprising a modified metal surface, wherein: (1) the metal is selected from the group consisting of Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Ir, Pt and Au; (2) an enzyme is covalently attached to the metal surface via an alkyloxy or an alkenyloxy moiety and, optionally, a linker moiety; (3)the alkyloxy or alkenyloxy moiety is covalently bonded to said metal surface via the alkyloxy or alkenyloxy O- atom; and (4) the linker moiety, if present, is covalently bonded to theenzyme and to the alkyloxy or alkenyloxy moiety; (b) a reference electrode; and (c) means for detecting an electricalsignal, the means being operationally coupled to at least working electrode (a) and reference electrode (b). The device according to the invention is also referred to as a biosensor. The invention also relates to a process for the modification of a metal surface and to a modified metal surface obtainable by the process. Furthermore, the invention relates to an electrode comprising said modified metal surface, and to a biosensor comprising said modified metal surface.
Data from: Aboveground mammal and invertebrate exclusions cause consistent changes in soil food webs of two subalpine grassland types, but mechanisms are system-specific
Vandegehuchte, Martijn L. ; Putten, W.H. van der; Duyts, H. ; Schütz, Martin ; Risch, Anita C. - \ 2016
soil ecology - above-belowground interactions - herbivory
Data_OIK-03341.R2.csv contains the data on nematode feeding type abundances and community indices, as well as the data used in the Structural Equation Models of the progressive aboveground mammal and invertebrate exclusion effects on the abundance of bacterivorous, fungivorous, plant-feeding and omni-carnivorous nematode abundance via pathways of plants, soil nutrients, soil microbial biomass, and soil environment in both short- and tall-grass vegetation
Aboveground vertebrate and invertebrate herbivore impact on net N mineralization in subalpine grasslands
Risch, A.C. ; Schütz, Martin ; Vandegehuchte, Martijn L. ; Putten, W.H. Van Der; Duyts, Henk ; Raschein, Ursina ; Gwiazdowicz, D.J. ; Busse, M.D. ; Page-Dumroese, D.S. ; Zimmermann, Stephan - \ 2015
Ecology 96 (2015)12. - ISSN 0012-9658 - p. 3312 - 3322.
Above-belowground interactions - Exclosure types - Functionally different herbivores - Herbivory - Nutrient cycling - Plant biomass - Plant properties - Soil arthropods - Soil mites - Soil properties - Subalpine grasslands - Switzerland

Aboveground herbivores have strong effects on grassland nitrogen (N) cycling. They can accelerate or slow down soil net N mineralization depending on ecosystem productivity and grazing intensity. Yet, most studies only consider either ungulates or invertebrate herbivores, but not the combined effect of several functionally different vertebrate and invertebrate herbivore species or guilds. We assessed how a diverse herbivore community affects net N mineralization in subalpine grasslands. By using size-selective fences, we progressively excluded large, medium, and small mammals, as well as invertebrates from two vegetation types, and assessed how the exclosure types (ET) affected net N mineralization. The two vegetation types differed in long-term management (centuries), forage quality, and grazing history and intensity. To gain a more mechanistic understanding of how herbivores affect net N mineralization, we linked mineralization to soil abiotic (temperature; moisture; NO3 -, NH4 +, and total inorganic N concentrations/pools; C, N, P concentrations; pH; bulk density), soil biotic (microbial biomass; abundance of collembolans, mites, and nematodes) and plant (shoot and root biomass; consumption; plant C, N, and fiber content; plant N pool) properties. Net N mineralization differed between ET, but not between vegetation types. Thus, shortterm changes in herbivore community composition and, therefore, in grazing intensity had a stronger effect on net N mineralization than long-term management and grazing history. We found highest N mineralization values when only invertebrates were present, suggesting that mammals had a negative effect on net N mineralization. Of the variables included in our analyses, only mite abundance and aboveground plant biomass explained variation in net N mineralization among ET. Abundances of both mites and leaf-sucking invertebrates were positively correlated with aboveground plant biomass, and biomass increased with progressive exclusion. The negative impact of mammals on net N mineralization may be related partially to (1) differences in the amount of plant material (litter) returned to the belowground subsystem, which induced a positive bottom-up effect on mite abundance, and (2) alterations in the amount and/or distribution of dung, urine, and food waste. Thus, our results clearly show that short-term alterations of the aboveground herbivore community can strongly impact nutrient cycling within ecosystems independent of long-term management and grazing history.

Traceability and trust
Trienekens, J.H. ; Czekala, A. ; Schütz, V. ; Wognum, N. ; Denolf, J. ; Theuvsen, L. - \ 2014
In: Quality and risk management in agri-food chains / Petersen, Brigitte, Nüssel, Manfred, Hamer, Martin, Wageningen : Wageningen Academic Publishers - ISBN 9789086862368 - p. 144 - 152.
Information and communication systems in food chains
Trienekens, J.H. ; Czekala, A. ; Schütz, V. ; Wognum, N. ; Denolf, J. - \ 2014
In: Quality and risk management in agri-food chains / Petersen, Brigitte, Nüssel, Manfred, Wageningen : Wageningen Academic Publishers - ISBN 9789086862368 - p. 136 - 143.
Effects of human handling during early rearing on the behaviour of dairy calves
Schütz, K.E. ; Hawke, M.L. ; Waas, J.R. ; McLeay, L.M. ; Bokkers, E.A.M. ; Reenen, C.G. van; Webster, J.R. ; Stewart, M. - \ 2012
Animal Welfare 21 (2012)1. - ISSN 0962-7286 - p. 19 - 26.
human-animal interactions - play-behavior - veal calves - cattle - welfare - cows - reactivity - responses - contact - heifers
We examined the effects of daily positive or negative human handling on the behaviour of Holstein-Friesian dairy calves (n = 20 calves per treatment, five calves per group). The response to humans and indicators of positive emotions were examined at four weeks of age. Calves that received positive handling approached a familiar handler within 1 min in 50% of the handling sessions compared to 17% of the sessions for negatively handled calves but showed no difference when approaching an unfamiliar person. Calves that received positive handling showed less avoidance behaviour in their home pen to an approaching unfamiliar person (score, positive: 3.7, negative: 2.8) but there was no treatment effect on flight distance when tested outside the home pen. Both treatment groups responded similarly to a novel object and performed the same amount of play behaviour. Calves that received positive handling interacted more with cow brushes than calves that received negative handling (positive: 9.9%, negative: 7.9% of the total time). At three months of age, avoidance behaviour was re-tested, this time including 20 control animals of the same breed and age, reared routinely on-farm. Controls showed more avoidance behaviour (positive: 1.5, negative: 1.0, control: 0.3) and had a greater flight distance (positive: 3.3 m, negative: 3.7 m, control: 4.9 m). The results confirm existing literature demonstrating that the quantity and quality of handling influence the response towards humans. Little evidence was found that the type of early handling influences behaviours indicative of positive emotions.
Assessing the potential value for an automated dairy cattle body condition scoring system through stochastic simulation
Bewley, J.M. ; Boehlje, M.D. ; Gray, A.W. ; Hogeveen, H. ; Kenyon, S.J. ; Eicher, S.D. ; Schutz, M.M. - \ 2010
Agricultural Finance Review 70 (2010)1. - ISSN 0002-1466 - p. 126 - 150.
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to develop a dynamic, stochastic, mechanistic simulation model of a dairy business to evaluate the cost and benefit streams coinciding with technology investments. The model was constructed to embody the biological and economical complexities of a dairy farm system within a partial budgeting framework. A primary objective was to establish a flexible, user-friendly, farm-specific, decision-making tool for dairy producers or their advisers and technology manufacturers. Design/methodology/approach – The basic deterministic model was created in Microsoft Excel (Microsoft, Seattle, Washington). The @Risk add-in (Palisade Corporation, Ithaca, New York) for Excel was employed to account for the stochastic nature of key variables within a Monte Carlo simulation. Net present value was the primary metric used to assess the economic profitability of investments. The model was composed of a series of modules, which synergistically provide the necessary inputs for profitability analysis. Estimates of biological relationships within the model were obtained from the literature in an attempt to represent an average or typical US dairy. Technology benefits were appraised from the resulting impact on disease incidence, disease impact, and reproductive performance. In this paper, the model structure and methodology were described in detail. Findings – Examples of the utility of examining the influence of stochastic input and output prices on the costs of culling, days open, and disease were examined. Each of these parameters was highly sensitive to stochastic prices and deterministic inputs. Originality/value – Decision support tools, such as this one, that are designed to investigate dairy business decisions may benefit dairy producers.
Stochastic simulation using @Risk for dairy business investment decisions
Bewley, J.D. ; Boehlje, M.D. ; Gray, A.W. ; Hogeveen, H. ; Kenyon, S.J. ; Eicher, S.D. ; Schutz, M.M. - \ 2010
Agricultural Finance Review 70 (2010). - ISSN 0002-1466 - p. 97 - 125.
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to develop a dynamic, stochastic, mechanistic simulation model of a dairy business to evaluate the cost and benefit streams coinciding with technology investments. The model was constructed to embody the biological and economical complexities of a dairy farm system within a partial budgeting framework. A primary objective was to establish a flexible, user-friendly, farm-specific, decision-making tool for dairy producers or their advisers and technology manufacturers. Design/methodology/approach – The basic deterministic model was created in Microsoft Excel (Microsoft, Seattle, Washington). The @Risk add-in (Palisade Corporation, Ithaca, New York) for Excel was employed to account for the stochastic nature of key variables within a Monte Carlo simulation. Net present value was the primary metric used to assess the economic profitability of investments. The model was composed of a series of modules, which synergistically provide the necessary inputs for profitability analysis. Estimates of biological relationships within the model were obtained from the literature in an attempt to represent an average or typical US dairy. Technology benefits were appraised from the resulting impact on disease incidence, disease impact, and reproductive performance. In this paper, the model structure and methodology were described in detail. Findings – Examples of the utility of examining the influence of stochastic input and output prices on the costs of culling, days open, and disease were examined. Each of these parameters was highly sensitive to stochastic prices and deterministic inputs. Originality/value – Decision support tools, such as this one, that are designed to investigate dairy business decisions may benefit dairy producers.
Individual human phenotypes in metabolic space and time
Bernini, Patrizia ; Bertini, Ivano ; Luchinat, Claudio ; Nepi, Stefano ; Saccenti, Edoardo ; Schäfer, Hartmut ; Schütz, Birk ; Spraul, Manfred ; Tenori, Leonardo - \ 2009
Journal of Proteome Research 8 (2009)9. - ISSN 1535-3893 - p. 4264 - 4271.
Gut microflora metabolites - Human metabolites - Individual metabolic fingerprint - Metabolomics - NMR spectroscopy - Principal component analysis

Differences between individual phenotypes are due both to differences in genotype and to exposure to different environmental factors. A fundamental contribution to the definition of the individual phenotype for clinical and therapeutic applications would come from a deeper understanding of the metabolic phenotype. The existence of unique individual metabolic phenotypes has been hypothesized, but the experimental evidence has been only recently collected. Analysis of individual phenotypes over the timescale of years shows that the metabolic phenotypes are largely invariant. The present work also supports the idea that the individual metabolic phenotype can also be considered a metagenomic entity that is strongly affected by both gut microbiome and host metabolic phenotype, the latter defined by both genetic and environmental contributions.

Den Treek Henschoten; fragmenten uit de bosbouwhistorie van een landgoed op de overgang van nat naar droog
Boosten, M. ; Laar, J.N. van; Schütz, P. - \ 2009
Wageningen : KNBV (Koninklijke Nederlandse Bosbouw Vereniging) Commissie Bosgeschiedenis (Excursiegids 25 september 2009) - 17
bosbouw - landgoederen - landgebruik - geschiedenis - historische ecologie - historische geografie - utrechtse heuvelrug - forestry - estates - land use - history - historical ecology - historical geography
Na een zeer geslaagde eerste excursie van de commissie bosgeschiedenis van de KNBV is een bezoek gebracht aan Den Treek- Henschoten, een particulier landgoed op de Utrechtse Heuvelrug met een rijke boshistorie. Het betreft de excursie van 25 september 2009. Voorafgaand aan de excursie is er een korte inleidende lezing over de historie van het landgoed door Willem de Beaufort, één van de eigenaren van het landgoed. Vervolgens worden tijdens een rondwandeling verschillende markante punten met historische fenomenen getoond en bediscussieerd. Deze excursiegids geeft een kenschets van het gebied en er zijn enkele fragmenten van oude kaarten opgenomen om het verleden zichtbaar te maken. Verder is de excursieroute toegevoegd en zijn per excursiepunt wetenswaardigheden vermeld
Effects of previous handling on calf responses towards humans
Schütz, K.E. ; Stewart, M. ; Hawke, M.L. ; Bokkers, E.A.M. ; Reenen, C.G. van; Webster, J.R. - \ 2009
Human-animal relationships affect the production and welfare of animals. We investigated whether the type of handling of dairy calves influences their response towards humans. Forty, group-housed, Holstein-Friesian calves were exposed to either positive (e.g. soft voices, slow movements, patting) or negative (e.g. rough voices, rapid movements, pushing) handling (n=20 calves/treatment, 5 calves/group), twice daily (7 min/session) from 4 days to 5 weeks of age. Reactions towards humans were investigated around 4 weeks of age in a 'calf escape test' in their home pens, and by measuring the flight distance in a raceway. In the calf escape test, each calf was given a score between 0 and 4 depending on whether the observer could (1) make eye contact, (2) take 1, or (3) 2 steps towards the calf, or (4) touch the calf before it moved away (defined as moving both forelegs). Data were analysed using ANOVA. Calves that received positive handling showed less avoidance behaviour (mean score; positive:3.7, negative:2.8, sd:0.66, p=0.039) but there was no difference between the treatment groups in flight distance (positive:0.6m, negative:0.7m, sed:0.24m, p=0.526). Calves that received positive handling were 3 times more likely to voluntarily approach a human within 1min, compared to negatively handled calves (50% vs 17% of the calves approached the human, sed: 9.8%, p=0.015). When the calves were 3 months old, we repeated the flight distance and calf escape tests and added a control group (n=20) of the same age that had been reared under normal farm management (minimal handling). Controls showed more avoidance behaviour in the calf escape test (mean score; positive:1.5, negative:1.0, control:0.3, sd:0.21, p
Sustainability of the wood chains between the Russian Federation and the Netherlands
Arets, E.J.M.M. ; Schütz, P. ; Pedroli, G.B.M. - \ 2009
Wageningen : Alterra (Alterra-rapport 1809) - 39
hout - houthandel - bosbouw - duurzaamheid (sustainability) - certificering - rusland - nederland - bosbeleid - houtproducten - wood - timber trade - forestry - sustainability - certification - russia - netherlands - forest policy - wood products
In this report an overview of sustainability issues in Russian forestry is given, focusing on the European part of Russia and trade with the Netherlands. The present situation and developments in Russian forestry are described, taking into account the new Forest Code and increasing export tax on round wood. Trade of wood products between the Russian Federation and the Netherlands is quantified and put into an international perspective. Further sustainability issues, both from a Russian and Dutch perspective of the wood chain are assessed, including forest certification, illegal logging and stricter Dutch procurement regulations. It contains both policy recommendations and suggestions for further research.
Soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer in regional scale climate modeling
Feddes, Reinder - \ 2008
soil water - evapotranspiration - soil plant relationships - models
Promote European regions' experience exchange on quality information management in food chains
Schütz, V. ; Petersen, B. ; Backus, G.B.C. ; Gardere, E. - \ 2008
In: Food Safety and Quality in International Food Chains. Technical reports of the Interreg IIIC Initiative PromSTAP (Promoting the stable to table approach) : Promoting the stable to table approach Berlin : MUNLV - ISBN 9783000236648 - p. 6 - 26.
Cross border Classical Swine Fever control: Improving Dutch and German crisis management systems by an integrated public-private approach
Breuer, O. ; Saatkamp, H.W. ; Schütz, V. ; Brinkmann, D. ; Petersen, B. - \ 2008
Journal für Verbraucherschutz und Lebensmittelsicherheit 3 (2008). - ISSN 1661-5751 - p. 455 - 465.
netherlands - epidemic
The objective of this research approach is to analyse in which ways crisis management measures against Classical Swine Fever (CSF) can be improved by a public private cross border model. A core activity contains the analysis of information and communication systems: In a case study it has been empirically analysed if a sufficient supply of public and private information enables crisis managers at both sides of the Dutch-German border area to take decisions about CSF control more efficient. At the end of this approach a new crisis management model had been developed. One of the most important aspects thereby is the assessment of data: (1) within private quality management systems in normal times according to the benefit for public management tasks in times of crisis and (2) within public crisis management systems according to the benefit for cross-border CSF-control activities. To this effect two different methodological approaches have been combined within the model: (1) a method to identify and illustrate public actors and their options in crisis management decision making and (2) a system of communication and information exchange between public and private as well as Dutch and German actors (engage& exchange model) which permit to collect and to evaluate data in addition for a predefined time period are activated.
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