Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Agricultural nitrogen and phosphorus emissions to water and their mitigation options in the Haihe Basin, China
Zhao, Zhanqing ; Qin, Wei ; Bai, Zhaohai ; Ma, Lin - \ 2019
Agricultural Water Management 212 (2019). - ISSN 0378-3774 - p. 262 - 272.
Crop-livestock system - Haihe Basin - Nitrogen - NUFER - Phosphorus - Water pollution

Agricultural nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) emissions to water bodies remain largely unknown in China, mainly due to the lack of reliable data sources and quantification tools. In this study, we constructed a grid-based NUFER (NUtrient Flow in food chains, Environment and Resources use) model in order to quantify a high-resolution agricultural N and P emissions to water bodies in Haihe Basin in 2012, based on data collected from county-level statistics, farm interview, and spatial data of topography, climate, soil texture, and land use. We also explored the mitigation strategies in 2030 via scenario analysis. The results showed that total agricultural N emission to water bodies in Haihe Basin was 1079 Gg N in 2012, of which cropland contributed 54%; total agricultural P emission to water bodies was 208 Gg P, livestock contributed 78%. There were large spatial variations in agricultural N and P emissions. Overall, the plain areas accounted for around 80% of the total agricultural N and P emissions to water in 2012. The highest N and P emission intensities were 10 t N km−2 and 2 t P km−2, respectively. N and P emissions were significantly related to anthropogenic factors (such as the livestock density and cropland) in the plain areas; whereas in mountainous areas, both anthropogenic and natural factors (e.g., slope deviation and soil texture) significantly affected N and P emissions. Our scenario analysis suggests that agricultural N and P emissions can be reduced by up to 45% and 77%, respectively for N and P in 2030, via improved agricultural and environmental policies, technologies and managements. The prohibition of direct animal manure discharge to the water system seems to be the most effective measure to mitigate the emissions. Our study provided a high-resolution agricultural N and P emissions to the water bodies of Haihe Basin and identified the most effective options to reduce these emissions in highly intensified agricultural areas.

Irrigation reduces the negative effect of global warming on winter wheat yield and greenhouse gas intensity
Li, Jiazhen ; Dong, Wenxu ; Oenema, Oene ; Chen, Tuo ; Hu, Chunsheng ; Yuan, Haijing ; Zhao, Liying - \ 2019
Science of the Total Environment 646 (2019). - ISSN 0048-9697 - p. 290 - 299.
Global warming potential - Greenhouse gas intensity - Greenhouse gases - Irrigation - Warming - Wheat yield

Global warming may exacerbate drought, decrease crop yield and affect greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in semi-arid regions. However, the interactive effects of increases in temperature and water availability on winter wheat yield and GHG emissions in semi-arid climates are not well-understood. Here, we report on a two-year field experiment that examined the effects of a mean soil temperature increase of ~2 °C (at 5 cm depth) with and without additional irrigation on wheat yield and GHG emissions. Infrared heaters were placed above the crop canopy at a height of 1.8 m to simulate warming. Fluxes of CH4, CO2 and N2O were measured using closed static chamber technique once per week during the wheat growing seasons. Warming decreased wheat yield by 28% in the relatively dry year of 2015, while supplemental irrigation nullified the warming effect completely. Warming did not alter the wheat yield significantly in the relatively wet year of 2016, but supplemental irrigation with no warming decreased the wheat yield by 25%. Warming increased CO2 emissions by 28% and CH4 uptake by 24% and tended to decrease N2O emissions. Supplemental irrigation increased N2O emissions but had little effect on CO2 emissions and CH4 uptake. Evidently, warming and supplemental irrigation had interactive effects on wheat yield, GHG emissions and GHG emissions intensity. Precision irrigation appears to be a means of simultaneously increasing wheat yield and reducing GHG emissions under warming conditions in semi-arid areas.

Purified Dietary Red and White Meat Proteins Show Beneficial Effects on Growth and Metabolism of Young Rats Compared to Casein and Soy Protein
Song, Shangxin ; Hua, Chun ; Zhao, Fan ; Li, Mengjie ; Fu, Qingquan ; Hooiveld, Guido J.E.J. ; Muller, Michael ; Li, Chunbao ; Zhou, Guanghong - \ 2018
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 66 (2018)38. - ISSN 0021-8561 - p. 9942 - 9951.
molecular nutrition - protein quality - proteomics - red meat - white meat

This study compared the effects of casein, soy protein (SP), red (RMP), and white meat (WMP) proteins on growth and metabolism of young rats. Compared to casein, the ratio of daily feed intake to daily body weight gain of rats was not changed by meat protein but reduced by SP by 93.3% (P < 0.05). Feeding RMP and WMP reduced the liver total cholesterol (TC) contents by 24.3% and 17.8%, respectively (P < 0.05). Only RMP increased plasma HDL-cholesterol concentrations (by 12.7%, P < 0.05), whereas SP increased plasma triacylglycerol, TC, and LDL-cholesterol concentrations by 23.7%, 19.5%, and 61.5%, respectively (P < 0.05). Plasma essential and total amino acid concentrations were increased by WMP (by 18.8% and 12.4%, P < 0.05) but reduced by SP (by 28.3% and 37.7%, P < 0.05). Twenty-five liver proteins were differentially expressed in response to different protein sources. Therefore, meat proteins were beneficial for growth and metabolism of young rats compared to casein and SP.

Synteny-based phylogenomic networks for comparative genomics
Zhao, Tao - \ 2018
University. Promotor(en): Eric Schranz. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789463433204 - 139
CD-MUSIC-EDL modeling of Pb2+ adsorption on birnessites : Role of vacant and edge sites
Zhao, Wei ; Tan, Wenfeng ; Wang, Mingxia ; Xiong, Juan ; Liu, Fan ; Weng, Liping ; Koopal, Luuk K. - \ 2018
Environmental Science and Technology 52 (2018)18. - ISSN 0013-936X - p. 10522 - 10531.
adsorption - Birnessite - CD-MUSIC Modeling - Electrical double layer model - External surface - Interlayer space - Manganese oxide - Mn average oxidation state - Pb - Rietveld refinement

The surface complexation modeling of metal adsorption to birnessites is in its infancy compared to the charge-distribution multi-site ion complexation (CD-MUSIC) models for iron/aluminum (hydr)oxides. Therefore, using X-ray diffraction with Rietveld refinement to obtain the reactive sites and their densities, a CD-MUSIC model combined with a Stern-Gouy-Chapman electrical double layer (EDL) model for the external surface and a Donnan model for the interlayer surface is developed for birnessites with different Mn average oxidation state (MnAOS). Proton affinity constants and the charge distributions of Pb surface complexes were calculated a priory. By fitting Pb adsorption data to the model the obtained equilibrium constants (logKPb) of Pb complexes were 6.9-10.9 for the double-corner-sharing and double-edge-sharing Pb2+ complexes on the edge sites and 2.2-6.5 for the triple-corner-sharing Pb2+ complex on the vacancies. The larger logKPb value was obtained for higher MnAOS. Speciation calculations showed that with increasing MnAOS from 3.67 to 3.92 the interlayer surface contribution to the total Pb2+ adsorption increased from 43.2% to 48.6%, and the vacancy contribution increased from 43.9% to 54.7%. The vacancy contribution from interlayer surface was predominant. The present CD-MUSIC-EDL model contributes to understand better the difference in metal adsorption mechanism between birnessite and iron/aluminum (hydr)oxides.

The red bayberry genome and genetic basis of sex determination
Jia, Hui Min ; Jia, Hui Juan ; Cai, Qing Le ; Wang, Yan ; Zhao, Hai Bo ; Yang, Wei Fei ; Wang, Guo Yun ; Li, Ying Hui ; Zhan, Dong Liang ; Shen, Yu Tong ; Niu, Qing Feng ; Chang, Le ; Qiu, Jie ; Zhao, Lan ; Xie, Han Bing ; Fu, Wan Yi ; Jin, Jing ; Li, Xiong Wei ; Jiao, Yun ; Zhou, Chao Chao ; Tu, Ting ; Chai, Chun Yan ; Gao, Jin Long ; Fan, Long Jiang ; Weg, Eric van de; Wang, Jun Yi ; Gao, Zhong Shan - \ 2018
Plant Biotechnology Journal (2018). - ISSN 1467-7644
genome - Morella rubra - sex-determining region - sex-linked marker

Morella rubra, red bayberry, is an economically important fruit tree in south China. Here, we assembled the first high-quality genome for both a female and a male individual of red bayberry. The genome size was 313-Mb, and 90% sequences were assembled into eight pseudo chromosome molecules, with 32 493 predicted genes. By whole-genome comparison between the female and male and association analysis with sequences of bulked and individual DNA samples from female and male, a 59-Kb region determining female was identified and located on distal end of pseudochromosome 8, which contains abundant transposable element and seven putative genes, four of them are related to sex floral development. This 59-Kb female-specific region was likely to be derived from duplication and rearrangement of paralogous genes and retained non-recombinant in the female-specific region. Sex-specific molecular markers developed from candidate genes co-segregated with sex in a genetically diverse female and male germplasm. We propose sex determination follow the ZW model of female heterogamety. The genome sequence of red bayberry provides a valuable resource for plant sex chromosome evolution and also provides important insights for molecular biology, genetics and modern breeding in Myricaceae family.

Multimodel ensembles improve predictions of crop–environment–management interactions
Wallach, Daniel ; Martre, Pierre ; Liu, Bing ; Asseng, Senthold ; Ewert, Frank ; Thorburn, Peter J. ; Ittersum, Martin van; Aggarwal, Pramod K. ; Ahmed, Mukhtar ; Basso, Bruno ; Biernath, Christian ; Cammarano, Davide ; Challinor, Andrew J. ; Sanctis, Giacomo De; Dumont, Benjamin ; Eyshi Rezaei, Ehsan ; Fereres, Elias ; Fitzgerald, Glenn J. ; Gao, Y. ; Garcia-Vila, Margarita ; Gayler, Sebastian ; Girousse, Christine ; Hoogenboom, Gerrit ; Horan, Heidi ; Izaurralde, Roberto C. ; Jones, Curtis D. ; Kassie, Belay T. ; Kersebaum, Christian C. ; Klein, Christian ; Koehler, Ann Kristin ; Maiorano, Andrea ; Minoli, Sara ; Müller, Christoph ; Naresh Kumar, Soora ; Nendel, Claas ; O'Leary, Garry J. ; Palosuo, Taru ; Priesack, Eckart ; Ripoche, Dominique ; Rötter, Reimund P. ; Semenov, Mikhail A. ; Stöckle, Claudio ; Stratonovitch, Pierre ; Streck, Thilo ; Supit, Iwan ; Tao, Fulu ; Wolf, Joost ; Zhang, Zhao - \ 2018
Global Change Biology (2018). - ISSN 1354-1013
climate change impact - crop models - ensemble mean - ensemble median - multimodel ensemble - prediction

A recent innovation in assessment of climate change impact on agricultural production has been to use crop multimodel ensembles (MMEs). These studies usually find large variability between individual models but that the ensemble mean (e-mean) and median (e-median) often seem to predict quite well. However, few studies have specifically been concerned with the predictive quality of those ensemble predictors. We ask what is the predictive quality of e-mean and e-median, and how does that depend on the ensemble characteristics. Our empirical results are based on five MME studies applied to wheat, using different data sets but the same 25 crop models. We show that the ensemble predictors have quite high skill and are better than most and sometimes all individual models for most groups of environments and most response variables. Mean squared error of e-mean decreases monotonically with the size of the ensemble if models are added at random, but has a minimum at usually 2–6 models if best-fit models are added first. Our theoretical results describe the ensemble using four parameters: average bias, model effect variance, environment effect variance, and interaction variance. We show analytically that mean squared error of prediction (MSEP) of e-mean will always be smaller than MSEP averaged over models and will be less than MSEP of the best model if squared bias is less than the interaction variance. If models are added to the ensemble at random, MSEP of e-mean will decrease as the inverse of ensemble size, with a minimum equal to squared bias plus interaction variance. This minimum value is not necessarily small, and so it is important to evaluate the predictive quality of e-mean for each target population of environments. These results provide new information on the advantages of ensemble predictors, but also show their limitations.

Environmental and taxonomic controls of carbon and oxygen stable isotope composition in Sphagnum across broad climatic and geographic ranges
Granath, Gustaf ; Rydin, Håkan ; Baltzer, Jennifer L. ; Bengtsson, Fia ; Boncek, Nicholas ; Bragazza, Luca ; Bu, Zhao Jun ; Caporn, Simon J.M. ; Dorrepaal, Ellen ; Galanina, Olga ; GaÅka, Mariusz ; Ganeva, Anna ; Gillikin, David P. ; Goia, Irina ; Goncharova, Nadezhda ; Hájek, Michal ; Haraguchi, Akira ; Harris, Lorna I. ; Humphreys, Elyn ; Jiroušek, Martin ; KajukaÅo, Katarzyna ; Karofeld, Edgar ; Koronatova, Natalia G. ; Kosykh, Natalia P. ; Lamentowicz, Mariusz ; Lapshina, Elena ; Limpens, Juul ; Linkosalmi, Maiju ; Ma, Jin Ze ; Mauritz, Marguerite ; Munir, Tariq M. ; Natali, Susan M. ; Natcheva, Rayna ; Noskova, Maria ; Payne, Richard J. ; Pilkington, Kyle ; Robinson, Sean ; Robroek, Bjorn J.M. ; Rochefort, Line ; Singer, David ; Stenøien, Hans K. ; Tuittila, Eeva Stiina ; Vellak, Kai ; Verheyden, Anouk ; Michael Waddington, James ; Rice, Steven K. - \ 2018
Biogeosciences 15 (2018)16. - ISSN 1726-4170 - p. 5189 - 5202.

Rain-fed peatlands are dominated by peat mosses (Sphagnum sp.), which for their growth depend on nutrients, water and CO2 uptake from the atmosphere. As the isotopic composition of carbon (12,13C) and oxygen (16,18O) of these Sphagnum mosses are affected by environmental conditions, Sphagnum tissue accumulated in peat constitutes a potential long-term archive that can be used for climate reconstruction. However, there is inadequate understanding of how isotope values are influenced by environmental conditions, which restricts their current use as environmental and palaeoenvironmental indicators. Here we tested (i) to what extent C and O isotopic variation in living tissue of Sphagnum is species-specific and associated with local hydrological gradients, climatic gradients (evapotranspiration, temperature, precipitation) and elevation; (ii) whether the C isotopic signature can be a proxy for net primary productivity (NPP) of Sphagnum; and (iii) to what extent Sphagnum tissue δ18O tracks the δ18O isotope signature of precipitation. In total, we analysed 337 samples from 93 sites across North America and Eurasia using two important peat-forming Sphagnum species (S. magellanicum, S. fuscum) common to the Holarctic realm. There were differences in δ13C values between species. For S. magellanicum δ13C decreased with increasing height above the water table (HWT, R2 =17%) and was positively correlated to productivity (R2 = 7%). Together these two variables explained 46% of the between-site variation in δ13C values. For S. fuscum, productivity was the only significant predictor of δ13C but had low explanatory power (total R2 = 6%). For δ18O values, approximately 90% of the variation was found between sites. Globally modelled annual δ18O values in precipitation explained 69% of the between-site variation in tissue δ18O. S. magellanicum showed lower δ18O enrichment than S. fuscum (-0.83 ‰ lower). Elevation and climatic variables were weak predictors of tissue δ18O values after controlling for δ18O values of the precipitation. To summarize, our study provides evidence for (a) good predictability of tissue δ18O values from modelled annual δ18O values in precipitation, and (b) the possibility of relating tissue δ13C values to HWT and NPP, but this appears to be species-dependent. These results suggest that isotope composition can be used on a large scale for climatic reconstructions but that such models should be species-specific.

Designing Vulnerable Zones of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Transfers to Control Water Pollution in China
Bai, Zhaohai ; Lu, Jie ; Zhao, Hao ; Velthof, Gerard L. ; Oenema, Oene ; Chadwick, Dave ; Williams, John R. ; Jin, Shuqin ; Liu, Hongbin ; Wang, Mengru ; Strokal, Maryna ; Kroeze, Carolien ; Hu, Chunsheng ; Ma, Lin - \ 2018
Environmental Science and Technology 52 (2018)16. - ISSN 0013-936X - p. 8987 - 8988.
Development and analysis of the Soil Water Infiltration Global database
Rahmati, Mehdi ; Weihermüller, Lutz ; Vanderborght, Jan ; Pachepsky, Yakov A. ; Mao, Lili ; Sadeghi, Seyed Hamidreza ; Moosavi, Niloofar ; Kheirfam, Hossein ; Montzka, Carsten ; Looy, Kris Van; Toth, Brigitta ; Hazbavi, Zeinab ; Yamani, Wafa Al; Albalasmeh, Ammar A. ; Alghzawi, M.Z. ; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael ; Antonino, Antônio Celso Dantas ; Arampatzis, George ; Armindo, Robson André ; Asadi, Hossein ; Bamutaze, Yazidhi ; Batlle-Aguilar, Jordi ; Béchet, Béatrice ; Becker, Fabian ; Blöschl, Günter ; Bohne, Klaus ; Braud, Isabelle ; Castellano, Clara ; Cerdà, Artemi ; Chalhoub, Maha ; Cichota, Rogerio ; Císlerová, Milena ; Clothier, Brent ; Coquet, Yves ; Cornelis, Wim ; Corradini, Corrado ; Coutinho, Artur Paiva ; Oliveira, Muriel Bastista De; Macedo, José Ronaldo De; Durães, Matheus Fonseca ; Emami, Hojat ; Eskandari, Iraj ; Farajnia, Asghar ; Flammini, Alessia ; Fodor, Nándor ; Gharaibeh, Mamoun ; Ghavimipanah, Mohamad Hossein ; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A. ; Giertz, Simone ; Hatzigiannakis, Evangelos G. ; Horn, Rainer ; Jiménez, Juan José ; Jacques, Diederik ; Keesstra, Saskia Deborah ; Kelishadi, Hamid ; Kiani-Harchegani, Mahboobeh ; Kouselou, Mehdi ; Jha, Madan Kumar ; Lassabatere, Laurent ; Li, Xiaoyan ; Liebig, Mark A. ; Lichner, Lubomír ; López, María Victoria ; Machiwal, Deepesh ; Mallants, Dirk ; Mallmann, Micael Stolben ; Oliveira Marques, Jean Dalmo De; Marshall, Miles R. ; Mertens, Jan ; Meunier, Félicien ; Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein ; Mohanty, Binayak P. ; Pulido-Moncada, Mansonia ; Montenegro, Suzana ; Morbidelli, Renato ; Moret-Fernández, David ; Moosavi, Ali Akbar ; Mosaddeghi, Mohammad Reza ; Mousavi, Seyed Bahman ; Mozaffari, Hasan ; Nabiollahi, Kamal ; Neyshabouri, Mohammad Reza ; Ottoni, Marta Vasconcelos ; Ottoni Filho, Theophilo Benedicto ; Pahlavan-Rad, Mohammad Reza ; Panagopoulos, Andreas ; Peth, Stephan ; Peyneau, Pierre Emmanuel ; Picciafuoco, Tommaso ; Poesen, Jean ; Pulido, Manuel ; Reinert, Dalvan José ; Reinsch, Sabine ; Rezaei, Meisam ; Roberts, Francis Parry ; Robinson, David ; Rodrigo-Comino, Jesüs ; Rotunno Filho, Otto Corrêa ; Saito, Tadaomi ; Suganuma, Hideki ; Saltalippi, Carla ; Sándor, Renáta ; Schütt, Brigitta ; Seeger, Manuel ; Sepehrnia, Nasrollah ; Sharifi Moghaddam, Ehsan ; Shukla, Manoj ; Shutaro, Shiraki ; Sorando, Ricardo ; Stanley, Ajayi Asishana ; Strauss, Peter ; Su, Zhongbo ; Taghizadeh-Mehrjardi, Ruhollah ; Taguas, Encarnación ; Teixeira, Wenceslau Geraldes ; Vaezi, Ali Reza ; Vafakhah, Mehdi ; Vogel, Tomas ; Vogeler, Iris ; Votrubova, Jana ; Werner, Steffen ; Winarski, Thierry ; Yilmaz, Deniz ; Young, Michael H. ; Zacharias, Steffen ; Zeng, Yijian ; Zhao, Ying ; Zhao, Hong ; Vereecken, Harry - \ 2018
Earth System Science Data 10 (2018)3. - ISSN 1866-3508 - p. 1237 - 1263.

In this paper, we present and analyze a novel global database of soil infiltration measurements, the Soil Water Infiltration Global (SWIG) database. In total, 5023 infiltration curves were collected across all continents in the SWIG database. These data were either provided and quality checked by the scientists who performed the experiments or they were digitized from published articles. Data from 54 different countries were included in the database with major contributions from Iran, China, and the USA. In addition to its extensive geographical coverage, the collected infiltration curves cover research from 1976 to late 2017. Basic information on measurement location and method, soil properties, and land use was gathered along with the infiltration data, making the database valuable for the development of pedotransfer functions (PTFs) for estimating soil hydraulic properties, for the evaluation of infiltration measurement methods, and for developing and validating infiltration models. Soil textural information (clay, silt, and sand content) is available for 3842 out of 5023 infiltration measurements (∼76%) covering nearly all soil USDA textural classes except for the sandy clay and silt classes. Information on land use is available for 76ĝ€% of the experimental sites with agricultural land use as the dominant type (∼40%). We are convinced that the SWIG database will allow for a better parameterization of the infiltration process in land surface models and for testing infiltration models. All collected data and related soil characteristics are provided online in ∗.xlsx and ∗.csv formats for reference, and we add a disclaimer that the database is for public domain use only and can be copied freely by referencing it. Supplementary data are available at https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.885492 (Rahmati et al., 2018). Data quality assessment is strongly advised prior to any use of this database. Finally, we would like to encourage scientists to extend and update the SWIG database by uploading new data to it.

Cronobacter spp., foodborne pathogens threatening neonates and infants
Chen, Qiming ; Zhu, Yang ; Qin, Zhen ; Qiu, Yongjun ; Zhao, Liming - \ 2018
Frontiers of Agricultural Science and Engineering 5 (2018)3. - ISSN 2095-7505 - p. 330 - 339.
Cronobacter spp. - Desiccation resistance - Pathogen control - Pathogen detection - Powdered infant formula

Cronobacter spp. (formerly Enterobacter sakazakii) are special foodborne pathogens. Cronobacter infection can cause necrotizing enterocolitis, sepsis and meningitis in all age groups, especially neonates and infants, with a high fatality of up to 80%, although the infection is rare. Outbreaks of Cronobacter infection are epidemiologically proven to be associated with contaminated powdered infant formula (PIF). Cronobacter spp. can resist dry environments and survive for a long period in food with low water activity. Therefore, Cronobacter spp. have become serious pathogens of neonates and infants, as well as in the dairy industry. In this review, we present the taxonomy, pathogenesis, resistance, detection and control of Cronobacter spp.

Hutten catering : How to organize innovation for vital consumers in a sustainable food system?
Ingenbleek, Paul T.M. ; Zhao, Yuan - \ 2018
International Food and Agribusiness Management Review 21 (2018)5. - ISSN 1096-7508 - p. 583 - 593.
Corporate social responsibility - Food service - Food system - Innovation - Responsible consumption - Sustainability

Hutten Catering is the only family-owned company listed among the top 10 catering companies in the Netherlands, yet it also has been the fastest growing company in this market for more than a decade. Catering companies face small margins and tight R & D budgets, yet their strategic position in the food system offers them unique opportunities to contribute to people's health and improve sustainability. Hutten Catering is located in a region with many potential innovation partners, supporting its integration of multiple suppliers, customers, and third parties in its innovation center, Food Squad. This center focuses on building sustainable supply chains that can reduce food waste; innovating specialist foods, such as for health care patients; and enabling vital lifestyles. With its many opportunities but limited budget, can Food Squad engage in more and larger projects, and thus further its impact on society, if it were to operate as an independent organization?

Influence of stocking density on growth, digestive enzyme activities, immune responses, antioxidant of Oreochromis niloticus fingerlings in biofloc systems
Liu, Gang ; Ye, Zhangying ; Liu, Dezhao ; Zhao, Jian ; Sivaramasamy, Elayaraja ; Deng, Yale ; Zhu, Songming - \ 2018
Fish and Shellfish Immunology 81 (2018). - ISSN 1050-4648 - p. 416 - 422.
Antioxidant - Biofloc - Digestive enzyme activities - Immune responses - Stocking density - Tilapia

A 120-day feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of different stocking densities on growth, the non-specific immunities, antioxidant status and digestive enzyme activities of Oreochromis niloticus fingerlings under a zero-water exchange biofloc system. Tilapias (0.51 ± 0.05 g) were randomly distributed in twelve tanks, each with 300 L water. The experimental design was completely randomized using three replications with four treatments 166 orgs m−3 (LD, low density), 333 orgs m−3 (MD, middle density) and 600 orgs m−3 (HD, high density) with glucose added as biofloc groups, and a clear water group without glucose added as a control 333 orgs m−3. The fish cultured in LD and MD group showed higher final body weight. For the digestive enzymes, the lipase, trypsin, and amylase activities were all depressed in HD group and control group. Regarding the immune and antioxidant abilities, significantly lower values (P < 0.05) of the lysozyme, complement 3, and glutathione were observed for the fish that reared in the control group and HD group. The stress indicator, the cortisol, 5-hydroxytryptamine, and glucose concentrations were also depressed in HD group and control group, meanwhile the alanine aminotransferase, aspartate transaminase and alkaline phosphatase were all higher in HD group and control group. The significant higher survival was observed in the LD and MD group after Vibrio harveyi challenge test. The results of the experiment indicated that the biofloc in situ had the effects of anti-crowding stress.

The intelligent delivery systems for bioactive compounds in foods : Physicochemical and physiological conditions, absorption mechanisms, obstacles and responsive strategies
Chai, Jingjing ; Jiang, Ping ; Wang, Pengjie ; Jiang, Yumeng ; Li, Dan ; Bao, Weier ; Liu, Bingxue ; Liu, Bin ; Zhao, Liyun ; Norde, Willem ; Yuan, Qipeng ; Ren, Fazheng ; Li, Yuan - \ 2018
Trends in Food Science and Technology 78 (2018). - ISSN 0924-2244 - p. 144 - 154.
Bioaccessibility - Bioactive compounds - Bioavailability - Delivery barriers - Encapsulation - Intelligent delivery systems

Background: Bioactive natural compounds have received considerable attention due to their health benefits, including anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-diabetes and cardiovascular disease-preventing functions. However, the stability of these sensitive compounds can be influenced by unfavourable environmental conditions during processing and storage. In addition, delivery of bioactive compounds via the oral route is restricted by various physiological barriers, including a harsh pH, gastrointestinal enzymes, the mucus layer, and the epithelium. Intelligent delivery systems are a promising method to protect bioactive molecules from degradation and improve their bioavailability. Scope and approach: We have demonstrated the physicochemical and physiological GI conditions. The structural composition of the epithelium and transport mechanisms of bioactives and nanoparticles across the intestinal epithelium were discussed. The effects of enhanced aqueous solubility, stability, bioaccessibility and bioavailability after encapsulation were illustrated. Furthermore, novel intelligent carriers that are responsive to the oral route, pH, enzymes and cell receptors were also discussed. Key findings and conclusions: This comprehensive multidisciplinary review provides useful guidelines for the application of bioactive compounds in the food industry. Intelligent carrier systems are designed to improve the low solubility, poor stability and low permeability of the gastrointestinal tract, and they have the potential to improve oral bioavailability.

Regulation of myostatin expression is associated with growth and muscle development in commercial broiler and DMC muscle
Dou, Tengfei ; Li, Zhengtian ; Wang, Kun ; Liu, Lixian ; Rong, Hua ; Xu, Zhiqiang ; Huang, Ying ; Gu, Dahai ; Chen, Xiaobo ; Hu, Wenyuan ; Zhang, Jiarong ; Zhao, Sumei ; Jois, Markandeya ; Li, Qihua ; Ge, Changrong ; Pas, Marinus F.W. te; Jia, Junjing - \ 2018
Molecular Biology Reports 45 (2018)4. - ISSN 0301-4851 - p. 511 - 522.
Commercial broiler chicken - Daweishan mini chicken - Growth rate - mRNA expression - Muscle weight - Myostatin
Myostatin is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth. Muscle tissue is the largest tissue in the body and influences body growth. Commercial Avian broiler chickens are selected for high growth rate and muscularity. Daweishan mini chickens are a slow growing small-sized chicken breed. We investigated the relations between muscle (breast and leg) myostatin mRNA expression and body and muscle growth. Twenty chickens per breed were slaughtered at 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 days of age. Body and muscle weights were higher at all times in Avian chickens. Breast muscle myostatin expression was higher in Avian chickens than in Daweishan mini chickens at day 30. Myostatin expression peaked at day 60 in Daweishan mini chickens and expression remained higher in breast muscle. Daweishan mini chickens myostatin expression correlated positively with carcass weight, breast and leg muscle weight from day 0 to 60, and correlated negatively with body weight from day 90 to 150, while myostatin expression in Avian chickens was negatively correlated with carcass and muscle weight from day 90 to 150. The results suggest that myostatin expression is related to regulation of body growth and muscle development, with two different regulatory mechanisms that switch between days 30 and 60.
Use of the beta growth function to quantitatively characterize the effects of plant density and a growth regulator on growth and biomass partitioning in cotton
Mao, Lili ; Zhang, Lizhen ; Sun, Xuezhen ; Werf, Wopke van der; Evers, Jochem B. ; Zhao, Xinhua ; Zhang, Siping ; Song, Xianliang ; Li, Zhaohu - \ 2018
Field Crops Research 224 (2018). - ISSN 0378-4290 - p. 28 - 36.
Beta growth function - Biomass partitioning - Growth rate - Mepiquat chloride - Plant population density
Allocation of newly formed biomass towards plant organs is a key determinant of plant performance that is affected by agronomic practices such as plant population density and use of growth regulators. Here we quantified biomass allocation of intercropped cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) growing at two population densities (3.0 and 7.5 plants m−2) and with or without application of the growth regulator mepiquat chloride (MC) in three consecutive years. The beta growth function was used to quantitatively characterize the dynamics of biomass partitioning. Compared to low density, high density increased daily growth rate and final above-ground dry matter, but decreased allocation to fruits. Application of MC did not affect dry matter accumulation but increased allocation to fruits by 22%. The parameters of the beta growth function have a clear biological interpretation, providing a useful quantitative characterization of the effect of management on dry matter allocation in cotton. The function may also be used to model organ-specific daily assimilate partitioning as a component in models of plant growth and crop production with the consideration of discussed caveats.
New insights into the phylogeny of the TMBIM superfamily across the three of life : Comparative genomics and synteny networks reveal independent evolution of the BI and LFG families in plants
Gamboa-Tuz, Samuel D. ; Pereira-Santana, Alejandro ; Zhao, Tao ; Schranz, M.E. ; Castano, Enrique ; Rodriguez-Zapata, Luis C. - \ 2018
Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 126 (2018). - ISSN 1055-7903 - p. 266 - 278.
Bax inhibitor 1 - Gene family evolution - Lifeguard - Programmed cell death - Synteny network - TMBIM
The Transmembrane BAX Inhibitor Motif containing (TMBIM) superfamily, divided into BAX Inhibitor (BI) and Lifeguard (LFG) families, comprises a group of cytoprotective cell death regulators conserved in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. However, no research has focused on the evolution of this superfamily in plants. We identified 685 TMBIM proteins in 171 organisms from Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya, and provided a phylogenetic overview of the whole TMBIM superfamily. Then, we used orthology and synteny network analyses to further investigate the evolution and expansion of the BI and LFG families in 48 plants from diverse taxa. Plant BI family forms a single monophyletic group; however, monocot BI sequences transposed to another genomic context during evolution. Plant LFG family, which expanded trough whole genome and tandem duplications, is subdivided in LFG I, LFG IIA, and LFG IIB major phylogenetic groups, and retains synteny in angiosperms. Moreover, two orthologous groups (OGs) are shared between bryophytes and seed plants. Other several lineage-specific OGs are present in plants. This work clarifies the phylogenetic classification of the TMBIM superfamily across the three domains of life. Furthermore, it sheds new light on the evolution of the BI and LFG families in plants providing a benchmark for future research.
The Hot Serial Cereal Experiment for modeling wheat response to temperature: field experiments and AgMIP-Wheat multi-model simulations
Martre, Pierre ; Kimball, Bruce A. ; Ottman, Michael J. ; Wall, Gerard W. ; White, Jeffrey W. ; Asseng, Senthold ; Ewert, Frank ; Cammarano, Davide ; Maiorano, Andrea ; Aggarwal, Pramod K. ; Anothai, Jakarat ; Basso, Bruno ; Biernath, Christian ; Challinor, Andrew J. ; Sanctis, Giacomo De; Doltra, Jordi ; Dumont, Benjamin ; Fereres, Elias ; Garcia-Vila, Margarita ; Gayler, Sebastian ; Hoogenboom, Gerrit ; Hunt, Leslie A. ; Izaurralde, Roberto C. ; Jabloun, Mohamed ; Jones, Curtis D. ; Kassie, Belay T. ; Kersebaum, Kurt C. ; Koehler, Ann-Kristin ; Müller, Christoph ; Kumar, Soora Naresh ; Liu, Bing ; Lobell, David B. ; Nendel, Claas ; O'Leary, Garry ; Olesen, Jørgen E. ; Palosuo, Taru ; Priesack, Eckart ; Rezaei, Ehsan Eyshi ; Ripoche, Dominique ; Rötter, Reimund P. ; Semenov, Mikhail A. ; Stöckle, Claudio ; Stratonovitch, Pierre ; Streck, Thilo ; Supit, Iwan ; Tao, Fulu ; Thorburn, Peter ; Waha, Katharina ; Wang, Enli ; Wolf, Joost ; Zhao, Zhigan ; Zhu, Yan - \ 2018
ODjAR : open data journal for agricultural research 4 (2018). - ISSN 2352-6378 - p. 28 - 34.
The data set reported here includes the part of a Hot Serial Cereal Experiment (HSC) experiment recently used in the AgMIP-Wheat project to analyze the uncertainty of 30 wheat models and quantify their response to temperature. The HSC experiment was conducted in an open-field in a semiarid environment in the southwest USA. The data reported herewith include one hard red spring wheat cultivar (Yecora Rojo) sown approximately every six weeks from December to August for a two-year period for a total of 11 planting dates out of the 15 of the entire HSC experiment. The treatments were chosen to avoid any effect of frost on grain yields. On late fall, winter and early spring plantings temperature free-air controlled enhancement (T-FACE) apparatus utilizing infrared heaters with supplemental irrigation were used to increase air temperature by 1.3°C/2.7°C (day/night) with conditions equivalent to raising air temperature at constant relative humidity (i.e. as expected with global warming) during the whole crop growth cycle. Experimental data include local daily weather data, soil characteristics and initial conditions, detailed crop measurements taken at three growth stages during the growth cycle, and cultivar information. Simulations include both daily in-season and end-of-season results from 30 wheat models.
Selection for growth rate and body size have altered the expression profiles of somatotropic axis genes in chickens
Jia, Junjing ; Ahmed, Irfan ; Liu, Lixian ; Liu, Yong ; Xu, Zhiqiang ; Duan, Xiaohua ; Li, Qihua ; Dou, Tengfei ; Gu, Dahai ; Rong, Hua ; Wang, Kun ; Li, Zhengtian ; Talpur, Mir Zulqarnain ; Huang, Ying ; Wang, Shanrong ; Yan, Shixiong ; Tong, Huiquan ; Zhao, Sumei ; Zhao, Guiping ; Pas, Marinus F.W. te; Su, Zhengchang ; Ge, Changrong - \ 2018
PLoS One 13 (2018)4. - ISSN 1932-6203
The growth hormone / insulin-like growth factor-1 (GH/IGF-1) pathway of the somatotropic axis is the major controller for growth rate and body size in vertebrates, but the effect of selection on the expression of GH/IGF-1 somatotropic axis genes and their association with body size and growth performance in farm animals is not fully understood. We analyzed a time series of expression profiles of GH/IGF-1 somatotropic axis genes in two chicken breeds, the Daweishan mini chickens and Wuding chickens, and the commercial Avian broilers hybrid exhibiting markedly different body sizes and growth rates. We found that growth rate and feed conversion efficiency in Daweishan mini chickens were significantly lower than those in Wuding chickens and Avian broilers. The Wuding and Daweishan mini chickens showed higher levels of plasma GH, pituitary GH mRNA but lower levels of hepatic growth hormone receptor (GHR) mRNA than in Avian broilers. Daweishan mini chickens showed significantly lower levels of plasma IGF-1, thigh muscle and hepatic IGF-1 mRNA than did Avian broilers and Wuding chickens. These results suggest that the GH part of the somatotropic axis is the main regulator of growth rate, while IGF-1 may regulate both growth rate and body weight. Selection for growth performance and body size have altered the expression profiles of somatotropic axis genes in a breed-, age-, and tissue-specific manner, and manner, and alteration of regulatory mechanisms of these genes might play an important role in the developmental characteristics of chickens.
Ecological succession drives the structural change of seed-rodent interaction networks in fragmented forests
Yang, Xifu ; Yan, Chuan ; Zhao, Qingjian ; Holyoak, Marcel ; Fortuna, Miguel A. ; Bascompte, Jordi ; Jansen, Patrick A. ; Zhang, Zhibin - \ 2018
Forest Ecology and Management 419-420 (2018). - ISSN 0378-1127 - p. 42 - 50.
Ecological networks - Forest succession - Habitat fragmentation - Habitat loss - Interaction strength - Nestedness - Network complexity - Seed-dispersal
While deforestation and fragmentation can cause massive species loss in forest ecosystems, forest regeneration can also drive successional changes in species composition. Although studies have sometimes documented the effects of these compositional changes on interspecific interactions, few studies have investigated changes in the structure of plant-animal networks. We investigated how interaction networks of assemblages of rodents and tree seeds changed with forest fragmentation and succession in a subtropical region. We compared seed-rodent interactions between 14 secondary forest patches that ranged in area from 2 to 58 ha, and from 10 to at least 100 years old, representing a successional gradient. We expected that deforestation and fragmentation would reduce seed production and diversify rodent communities, resulting in higher interaction strengths and connectivity, but weak nestedness (i.e., specialists interact with subsets of the species interaction of generalists). We measured the frequency of rodents eating and removing seeds (interaction strength) in each patch during 3 successive years, using seed tagging and infrared camera trapping, and calculated the properties of the seed-rodent networks. We found that the relative abundances of seeds and rodents changed with stand age not patch size, as did seed-rodent interactions: older patches produced more seeds, contained fewer individuals and species of rodents, and had seed-rodent networks with lower connectance and interaction strength, but higher nestedness. Connectance and interaction strength decreased with metabolic per capita seed availability (as measured by seed energy value); nestedness increased with seed richness, but decreased with rodent abundance. At species level, we found stand age and patch size showed significant effects on seed or rodent abundance of a few species. We also found seed coat thickness and starch contents had significant effects on network metrics. Our results suggest that during succession after deforestation, seed-rodent interactions in these sub-tropical forests change from a state dominated by high seed removal and highly connected seed-rodent networks to a state with more seeds and highly nested networks. From a management perspective of our study region, succession age, not fragment size, and network structure should be paid more attention so as to facilitate the restoration processes of degraded forests. Rodent management should be applied to protect native forest species and exclude incursive ones from farmlands and human residences at early succession stage.
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