Functional-Structural Plant Modelling in Crop Production

Proceedings of the Frontis Workshop on Functional-Structural Plant Modelling in Crop Production, Wageningen, The Netherlands, 5-8 March 2006

Editors:
J. Vos
Crop and Weed Ecology Group
Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen, The Netherlands

L.F.M. Marcelis
Plant Research International
Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen, The Netherlands

P.H.B. de Visser
Plant Research International
Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen, The Netherlands

P.C. Struik
Crop and Weed Ecology Group
Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen, The Netherlands

J.B. Evers
Crop and Weed Ecology Group
Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen, The Netherlands

Series editor:
R.J. Bogers
Frontis – Wageningen International Nucleus for Strategic Expertise
Wageningen University and Research Centre, Wageningen, The Netherlands

About the book | Table of Contents

Functional-structural plant models, FSPMs or virtual plant models, are the terms used to refer to models explicitly describing the development over time of the three-dimensional (3D) architecture or structure of plants as governed by physiological processes, the timing of which is determined by environmental factors. FSPMs are particularly suited to analyse problems in which the spatial structure of the plant or plant canopy is an essential factor contributing to the explanation of the behaviour of the system of study. Applications of FSPMs therefore include the study of plant competition (intra-plant, inter-plant, inter-species), and analysis of the effects of plant configuration and plant manipulation (e.g. pruning and harvesting) on the quantity and quality of the produce.
This book provides an introduction to functional-structural plant modelling. Several platforms and tools are described for making FSPMs. These include L-Systems (L-Studio), relational growth grammars (GroIMP), VICA and Greenlab. Methods for measuring essential parameters, including architectural ones, are outlined. FSPMs offer new opportunities to model sink-source interactions. Therefore the physiological theory on partitioning of carbon, as well as modelling approaches, is given specific attention. Crop-specific approaches to modelling plant structure and function are included (wheat, broad bean, chrysanthemum, cucumber). 3D plant models are not the final goal in themselves but provide innovative, enabling tools for studying a system. Examples in the book include wheat modelling in the context of remote-sensing research and the analysis of predator-prey insect interactions on glasshouse plants.
The book will be useful for scientists and students interested in advanced approaches in plant and crop modelling.

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